Illinois Delegation

This is one of the 50 delegations in the convention, accounting for 39 of 713 people who took part.

Members (39):

Name Visualize Details Delegations
Granvill Barrere Visualize (July 11, 1829 — January 13, 1889) Granville Barrere was an American politician and lawyer. Barrere was born in Hillsboro, Ohio in 1829 and moved to Illinois in 1855. He graduated from Marietta College, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1853. After moving to Illinois, Barrere served as a member of the city board of education, and on the board of supervisors of Canton. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000173] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John L. Beveridge Visualize (July 6, 1824 — May 3, 1910) John Lourie Beveridge was a teacher, lawyer, and politician. Beveridge was born in Greenwich, New York in 1824 and moved to Illinois in 1842. He taught school from 1845 to 1851, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1851. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and served as a major, colonel, and brigadier general. Beveridge was serving as a State Senator when he was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of John Logan. He served in the House from November 7, 1871 o January 4, 1873, when he resigned to serve as Lieutenant Governor of Illinois. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000430] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Horatio C. Burchard Visualize (September 22, 1825 — May 14, 1908) Horatio Chapin Burchard was an American politician and lawyer. Burchard was born in Marshall, New York in 1825 and moved to Illinois in 1854. He graduated from Hamilton College in 1850, after which he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1854. After moving to Freeport, Illinois, Burchard served in the State House of Representatives from 1863 to 1866. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Elihu Washburne during the Forty-First Congress. His overall service in Congress extended from December 6, 1869 to March 3, 1879. After 1879, Burchard served in many capacities including Director of the United States Mint (1879-1885), member of the commission to revise Illinois revenue laws (1885-1886), and head of the jury of awards of the mining department of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893). [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B001070] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Albert G. Burr Visualize "(November 8, 1829 -- June 10, 1882) Albert George Burr was a(n) teacher, merchant, lawyer, public servant, judge, and American politician. Burr was born close to Batavia, Genesee County, New York and moved to Illinois. Albert studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1856. He was a member of the state house of representatives (1861-1864), member of state constitutional convention (1870), and elected circuit judge of the 7th judicial circuit (1877 - death June 10, 1882). Burr was elected as a Democrat to the 40th and 41st Congresses (March 4, 1867 - March 3, 1871), was not reelected. [Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=B001134]" Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Joseph G. Cannon Visualize (May 7, 1836 — November 12, 1926) Joseph Gurney Cannon was an American politician and lawyer. Cannon was born in Guilford, North Carolina in 1836 and moved to Tuscola, Illinois in 1859. He studied law and the Cincinnati Law School and was admitted to the bar in 1858. After moving to Illinois in 1859, Cannon served as the State’s attorney for the twenty-seventh judicial district of Illinois, before being elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives in 1872. He served in the House from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1891. Cannon was not elected to serve in the Fifty-Second Congress in 1890, but was elected to serve again in the Fifty-Third Congress. He further served for the nine succeeding Congresses from 1893 to 1913. During the Fifty-Eighth through Sixty-First Congresses, Cannon was Speaker of the House of Representatives. Again, he lost an election for the Sixty-Third Congress, but was successfully in the election for the Sixty-Fourth Congress. He served for a final time in the House of Representatives from 1915 until he retired from public life in 1923. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000121] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Bernard G. Caulfield Visualize (October 18, 1828 — December 19, 1887) Bernard Gregory Caulfield was a lawyer, politician, and later on in life, a landowner. Caulfield was born in Alexandria, Virginia in 1828 and moved to Chicago in 1853. He graduated from Georgetown College in 1848 and studied law at the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. Caulfield was admitted to the bar in 1850 and practiced law in Kentucky until he moved to Illinois in 1853. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of John B. Rice. He served from February 1, 1875 to March 3, 1877. After his service in Congress, Caulfield moved to the Dakota Territory and became a large landowner. He died in what is now South Dakota in 1887. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000255] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Isaac Clements Visualize (March 31, 1837 — May 31, 1909) Isaac Clements was a teacher, lawyer, and politician. Clements was born in Brookville, Indiana in 1837 and moved to Illinois after studying law. He graduated from Indiana Asbury College (now De Pauw University) and taught school in Illinois after studying law in Greencastle. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and attained the rank of second lieutenant. After the war, he was appointed register in bankruptcy in 1867, and served in that capacity until being elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives in 1872. Clements served in the House from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875, after which he served as a United States penitentiary commissioner, pension agent, and superintendent of a soldiers’ orphans’ home. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000507] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Burton C. Cook Visualize "(May 11, 1819 -- August 18, 1894) Burton Chauncey Cook was a lawyer and American politician. Cook was born in Pittsford, Monroe County, New York and then moved to Ottawa, Illinois in 1835. Cook studied law and commenced the practice of law in 1840. In 1846 he was the Illinois State Attorney for the 9th Judicial Court for 6 years from 1846 to 1852. He was a member of the State Senate (1852-1860). He was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860 and 1864. He was also a member of the Peace Convention of 1861, in Washington D.C., in an effort to prevent the upcoming war. He was elected as a Republican for the 39th, 40th, 41st, and 42nd Congresses from March 4, 1865 to August 26, 1871, when he resigned. During his time in congress he served as the chairman on Roads and Canals (40th Congress) and on the Committee on District of Columbia (41st congress). [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=C000715]" Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Franklin Corwin Visualize (January 12, 1818 — June 15, 1879) Franklin Corwin was an American politician and lawyer. Corwin was born in Lebanon, Ohio in 1818. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1839 in Wilmington, Ohio. Corwin served in the Ohio State House of Representatives (1846, 1847) and in the State Senate (1847-1849). In 1857, he moved to Illinois and there served in the Illinois House of Representatives as Speaker. Corwin was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. After his service in Congress, he resumed practicing law in Illinois and did that until his death in 1879. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000789] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John M. Crebs Visualize (April 9, 1830 — June 26, 1890) John Montgomery Crebs was an American politician and lawyer. Crebs was born in Middleburg, Virginia in 1830 and moved to Illinois with his parents in 1837. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1852. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and served as a lieutenant colonel. He also served in a brigade of Calvary in the Department of the Gulf. Crebs was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1873. After his service in Congress, he practiced law until his death in 1890. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/C000900] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Shelby M. Cullom Visualize "(November 22, 1829 -- January 28, 1914) Shelby Moore Cullom was a lawyer and American politician. Cullom was born in Wayne County, Kentucky and moved to Tazewell County, Illinois in 1830. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1855. He was elected as the city attorney of Springfield in 1855. He was a member of the state house of representatives (1856, 1860-1861, 1873-1874), and served as speaker of the house during the 2nd year and in 1873. He was a Governor of Illinois from 1877-1883 when he resigned. He was elected as a Republican to the 39th, 40th, and 41st Congresses from March 4, 1865 - March 3, 1871). During this time he was chairman of the Committee on Territories (41st Congress). He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1882 and was reelected in 1888, 1894, 1900, and 1906 (March 4 1883 -- March 3, 1913). During his time in the Senate, he served as chairman on Committee on Expenditures of Public Money (1885-1887), on the Committee on Interstate Commerce (1887-1893, 1895 - 1901, 1909 - 1913), on the Committee on Foreign Relations (1901 - 1911), was a Regent of the Smithsonian Institution (1885-1913), Republican Conference Chairman (1911-1913), was a chairman and resident commissioner of the Lincoln Memorial Commission in 1913 and 1914, and was a member of the commission appointed to prepare a system of laws for the Hawaiian Islands. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=C000973]" Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John R. Eden Visualize (1 February, 1826 -- 9 June, 1909) Eden was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Bath County, Ky., Eden was admitted to the bar in 1853 and began practice in Sullivan, Illinois. Eden was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-eighth Congress serving from March 4, 1863 to March 3, 1865. He was not reelected in 1864; however, he was later elected to the Forty-third, Forty-fourth, and Forty-fifth Congresses. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation) , Illinois Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65)
John F. Farnsworth Visualize (27 March, 1820 -- 14 July, 1897) Farnsworth was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Eaton, Canada, Farnsworth was admitted to the bar and settled into practice at St. Charles, Illinois in 1841. Farnsworth was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses and served in the Union army during the Civil War. Farnsworth resigned in 1863 and was elected into the Thirty-eighth Congress. He later was elected into the Thirty-ninth, Fortieth, Forty-first, and Forty-second Congresses. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation) , Illinois Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Charles B. Farwell Visualize (July 1, 1823 — September 23, 1903) Charles Benjamin Farwell was a government surveyor, farmer, businessman, and politician. Farwell was born in Painted Post, New York in 1823 and moved to Illinois in 1838. In Illinois he worked as a government surveyor and farmer until 1844 when he started working in banking and real estate. While working in the dry goods business, Farwell served as a member of the State board of equalization, chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Cook County, and national-bank examiner. He was first elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Republican to the Forty-Second Congress and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1875. Although Farwell had presented his credentials to the Forty-Fourth Congress, he was succeeded by John LeMoyne, after LeMoyne successfully contested his election. However, he was elected to the Forty-Seventh Congress and served from 1881 to 1883. In 1887, Farwell was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of John Logan in the United States Senate. He served in the Senate from January 19, 1887 to March 3, 1891. After serving in Congress, Farwell engaged in the mercantile business until his death in 1903. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/F000037] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Greenbury L. Fort Visualize (October 17, 1825 — January 13, 1883) Greenbury Lafayette Fort was a politician, judge, and lawyer. Fort was born in French Grant, Ohio in 1825 and moved to Illinois in 1847 after studying law and being admitted to the bar. While in Illinois, he served as sheriff, clerk of Marshall County, and county judge. During the Civil War, Fort served as a second lieutenant, lieutenant colonel, quartermaster, and brevetted major. After the war, he served in the Illinois State Senate before being elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives in 1872. He served in the House from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1881. After serving in Congress, Fort retired from public life and died in 1883. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/F000288] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John B. Hawley Visualize (February 9, 1831 — May 24, 1895) John Baldwin Hawley was an American politician and lawyer. Hawley was born in Hawleyville, Connecticut in 1831, and moved to Illinois in 1833 with his parents. He attended Jacksonville College, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1854. Hawley acted as the State’s attorney from 1856 to 1860. During the Civil War he served in the Union Army and was made captain of a company in the Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Hawley was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1875. After serving in Congress, he was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury from 1877 to 1880. In 1880, he returned to practicing law and later acted as general attorney for the Northwestern Railroad Company until his death in 1895. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H000376] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John B. Hay Visualize (January 8, 1834 — June 16, 1916) John Breese Hay was a lawyer, politician, and judge. Hay was born in Belleville, Illinois in 1834. Growing up he received limited school but Hay learned printing. After studying law, he was admitted to the bar in 1851 and became the prosecuting attorney for the twenty-fourth judicial district in Illinois. He served in that capacity from 1860 to 1868. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and served un the One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment of the Illinois Volunteer Infantry. After the war, Hay was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1873. After serving in Congress, he was postmaster of Belleville, judge of St. Clair County Court, and mayor of Belleville for four years in 1901. Hay finished off his career as a county judge, serving from 1905 to 1914. He died in Belleville in 1916. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H000383] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Stephen A. Hurlbut Visualize (November 29, 1815 — March 27, 1882) Stephen Augustus Hurlbut was an American politician and lawyer. Hurlbut was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1815 and moved to Illinois in 1845. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1837. After moving to Illinois, Hurlbut served in the State constitutional convention in 1847, as well as in the State House of Representatives in 1859, 1861, and 1867. During the Civil War, he served in the Union Army and attained the rank of brigadier general. Hurlbut was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1877. However, he unsuccessfully ran as an Independent Republican to the Forty-Fifth Congress in 1876. After serving in Congress, Hurlbut served as Minister to Peru until his death in 1882. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/H001003] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Ebon C. Ingersoll Visualize (12 December, 1831 -- 31 May, 1879) Ingersoll was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Dresden, Yates County, N.Y., Ingersoll moved into Wisconsin Territory in 1843 and subsequently to Illinois. Ingersoll was admitted to the bar in 1854 and began practice. Ingersoll was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-eighth Congress to fill a vacancy left by Owen Lovejoy after his death. Ingersoll was reelected to the Thirty-ninth, Fortieth, and Forty-first Congresses and served from May 20, 1864 to March 3, 1871. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation) , Illinois Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Norman B. Judd Visualize "(January 10, 1815 -- November 11, 1878) Norman Buel Judd was a(n) lawyer, public servant, minister, collector at a port, and American politician. Norman was born in Rome, New York and moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1836. Judd studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1836. He was a city attorney (1837 - 1839), member of the state senate (1844-1860), delegate to the Republican National Convention (1860), was appointed Minister Plenipotentiary to Berlin, by President Lincoln (March 6, 1861 - 1865), and was collector at the port of Chicago by President Grant (December 5, 1872 - his death November 11, 1878). Judd was elected as a Republican to the 40th and 41st Congresses (March 4, 1867 - March 3, 1871) and declined to be reelected. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774- Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=J000277]" Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Robert M. Knapp Visualize (April 21, 1831 — June 24, 1889) Robert McCarty Knapp was an American lawyer and politician. Knapp was born in New York City in 1831, and moved to Illinois in 1839 with his parents. He attended the Kentucky Military Institute, studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1855. Knapp served in the State House of Representatives in 1867, and as mayor of Jerseyville for five years from 1871 to 1876. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. He was not reelected for the Forty-Fourth Congress in 1874, but was later elected to the Forty-Fifth Congress, where is served from 1877 to 1879. After serving in Congress, Knapp returned to Jerseyville and resumed practicing law until his death in 1889. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/K000281] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John A. Logan Visualize "(February 9, 1826 -- December 26, 1886) John Alexander Logan was a(n) soldier, clerk, lawyer, public servant, general, manager to conduct impeachment, and American politician. Logan was born in Murphysboro, Jackson County, Illinois. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1852. He served in the war with Mexico as a lieutenant, in the Union Army, and was commissioned brigadier general, commissioned major general of Volunteers. John was a clerk to the Jackson County Court (1849), prosecuting attorney for the 3rd judicial district of Illinois (1853-1857), and was one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives to conduct impeachment proceedings against President Andrew Johnson (1868). John also served on the Illinois house of representatives (1852-1853 and 1856-1857), as a presidential elector on the Democratic Ticket (1856), conceived the idea of Memorial day and inaugurated the observance (May 1868), and was an unsuccessful Republican nominee for Vice President of the United States in 1884. Logan was elected as a Democrat to the 36th and 37th Congresses (March 4, 1859 - April 2, 1862) and resigned to serve in the Civil War. He served as a Chairman on the Committee on Revisal and Unfinished Business in the 36th and 37th Congresses. He was elected as a Republican to the 40th, 41st, 42nd Congresses (March 4, 1867 - until his resignation March 3, 1871), where he served as Chairman on the Committee on Military Affairs. Logan was also elected as a Republican to the United States Senate (March 4, 1871 - March 3, 1877), was reelected in 1879 and 1885 (March 4, 1879 - his death December 26, 1886). During his time as a Senator, he served as Chairmen on the Committee on Military Affairs (43rd, 44th, 47th, and 48th Congresses). [Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=L000403]" Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Illinois Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Samuel S. Marshall Visualize "(March 12, 1821 -- July 26, 1890) Samuel Scott Marshall was an American politician, judge, lawyer, and president of the board of managers of Hamilton College (1875-1880). Samuel was born near Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Illinois. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1845. He was a member of the State house of representatives in 1846 and 1847. He was the State's attorney for the 3rd judicial circuit of Illinois (1847 and 1848) and was a circuit court judge (1851-1844 and 1861-1864). He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention (1860, 1864, and 1880) and delegate to the Union National Convention at Philadelphia in 1866. Marshall was elected as a democrat to the 34th and 35th Congresses (March 4, 1855 - March 3, 1859) where he was Chairman on the Committee on Claims (35th Congress). He was then elected as a democratic for the United States Senate in 1861. He served in the 39th, 40th, 41, 42nd, and 43rd Congresses (March 4, 1865 - March 3, 1875), where he was candidate for the Democratic Speaker of the House in 1867. He was not reelected. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress 1774 - Present', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=M000160]" Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
James S. Martin Visualize (August 19, 1826 — November 20, 1907) James Stewart Martin was an American politician and lawyer. Martin was born in Scott County, Virginia in 1826 and moved to Illinois in 1846. He served in the Mexican War with the First Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, after which he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1861. He served again in a war, this time serving in the Union Army during the Civil War. He was a colonel and brigadier general before mustering out in 1865. Martin was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served in March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. After serving in Congress, he acted as commissioner of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary starting in 1879. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/M000184] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Thompson W. McNeely Visualize (October 5, 1835 — July 23, 1921) Thompson Ware McNeely was a lawyer and politician. McNeely was born in Jacksonville, Illinois in 1835. He graduated from Lombard College in 1856 and studied law at the University of Louisville, Kentucky. He graduated in 1857 and was admitted to the bar that same year. McNeely served in the Illinois constitutional convention in 1862 while practicing law in Menard County, Illinois. He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1873. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/M000585] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John McNulta Visualize (November 9, 1837 — February 22, 1900) John McNulta was a businessman, lawyer, and politician. McNulta was born in New York City in 1837 and moved to Illinois in 1859. While in Illinois he worked in the manufacturing of cigars while studying law. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and served in the Illinois Volunteer Infantry. After serving in the Army, McNulta was admitted to the bar and practiced law in Bloomington, Illinois. He also served in the State Senate from 1869 and 1873, before being elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Republican. McNulta served in the House from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/M000587] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Jesse H. Moore Visualize (April 22, 1817 — July 11, 1883) Jesse Hale Moore was a teacher, Methodist minister, and politician. Moore was born in Lebanon, Illinois in 1817. After graduating from McKendree College in 1842, he taught school in Nashville and Georgetown, Illinois. Moore studied for the ministry and was ordained a Methodist minister in 1849. During the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army and served as a colonel in the Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Moore was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1869 to March 3, 1873. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/M000902] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
William R. Morrison Visualize (24 September, 1824 -- 29 September, 1909) Morrison was an American lawyer, politician, and colonel. Born in Monroe County, Ill., Morrison was a soldier in the Mexican-American War. After returning to Illinois in 1851, Morrison studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1855. From 1852 to 1860 Morrison was a member of the State house of representatives, returning again in 1870. During the Civil War, Morrison was colonel of the Forty-ninth Regiment. While in still in command, Morrison was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-eighth Congress. Later, Morrison was elected to the Forty-third and six succeeding Congresses. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation) , Illinois Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65)
Richard J. Oglesby Visualize (July 25, 1824 — April 24, 1899) Richard James Oglesby was a farmer, carpenter, rope-maker, miner, lawyer, and politician. Oglesby was born in Floydsburg, Kentucky in 1824. After being orphaned, he moved to Illinois to be raised by an uncle. Oglesby received limited schooling in his childhood but learned trades such as rope-making and carpentry. He later worked in those trades, and as a farmer. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1845 and practiced law in Sullivan, Illinois. After serving in the Mexican War, Oglesby worked as a miner in California for a two years. He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate during the Thirty-Sixth Congress, but only served for the first session before resigning to fight in the Union Army during the Civil War. He attained the ranks of colonel, brigadier general, and major general while serving in the Illinois Volunteer Infantry. After the Civil War, he was elected Governor of Illinois and served in that capacity from 1865 to 1869. He was again elected as Governor in 1872 but only served until 1873, when he was again elected to the United States Senate. Oglesby served as a Republican in the Senate from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1879, after which he served as Governor of Illinois for four more years from 1885 to 1889. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/O000048] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
William H. Ray Visualize (December 14, 1812 — January 25, 1881) William Henry Ray was a businessman, banker, and politician. Ray was born in Amenia, New York in 1812 and moved to Illinois in 1834. In Illinois he worked in the mercantile industry and as a banker, while also serving as a member of the State board of equalization. Ray was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. After serving in Congress, he continued working in business until his death in 1881. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/R000081] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Edward Y. Rice Visualize (February 8, 1820 — April 16, 1883) Edward Young Rice was an American politician and lawyer. Rice was born in Russellville, Kentucky in 1820 and moved to Illinois in 1844. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1844, and practiced law in Hillsboro, Illinois. In 1847, he was elected as county recorder. Later he served in the State House of Representatives (1849, 1850), and as a judge of the Montgomery County Court (1851, 1852). Rice was a member of the State constitutional convention in 1869 and 70 before being elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives in 1870. He served in the House from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1873. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/R000197] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
John B. Rice Visualize (May 28, 1809 — December 17, 1874) John Blake Rice was a theater performer and manager, and politician. Rice was born in Easton, Maryland in 1809. After receiving limited schooling, he became involved in theater and worked on the stage in New York until moving to Chicago, Illinois in 1847. In Illinois he continued to work in theater, this time as a theater manager. Rice retired from theater and theater management in 1861, after which he served as mayor of Chicago from 1865 to 1869. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 until his death on December 17, 1874. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/R000200] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
James C. Robinson Visualize (19 August, 1823 -- 3 November, 1886) Robinson was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Edgar County, Ill., Robinson served as a colonel in the Mexican-American War. Later in 1850, Robinson was admitted to the bar. Robinson was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, and Thirty-eighth Congresses and later to the Forty-second and Forty-third Congresses. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Illinois Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , Illinois Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Henry Snapp Visualize (June 30, 1822 — November 26, 1895) Henry Snapp was an American politician and lawyer. Snapp was born in Livonia, New York in 1822 and moved to Illinois in 1833. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1843. Snapp served as a member of the State Senate from 1869 to 1871, before being elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Republican to the Forty-Second Congress. He was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Burton Cook. He served in the House from December 4, 1871 to March 3, 1873. After serving in Congress, Snapp practiced law until his death in 1895. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/S000649] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Bradford N. Stevens Visualize (January 3, 1813 — November 10, 1885) Bradford Newcomb Stevens was a teacher, businessman, and politician. Stevens was born in Boscawen, New Hampshire in 1813 and moved to Illinois in 1846. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1835 and taught school in Kentucky and New York City. After moving to Illinois in 1846, Stevens worked in the mercantile business and agriculture. He later served as county surveyor and mayor of Tiskilwa, Illinois. Stevens was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1873. After serving in Congress, he continued to work in the mercantile and agriculture businesses until his death in 1885. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/S000876] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Lyman Trumbull Visualize (12 October, 1813 -- 25 June, 1896) Trumbull was an American lawyer and politician. Born in Colchester, Conn., after admittance to the bar and brief practice in Greenville, Ga., Trumbull moved to Illinois in 1837. Trumbull was a member of the State house of representatives from 1840-1841, the secretary of State of Illinois in 1841 and 1843, and the justice of the supreme court of Illinois 1848-1853. Although elected to the Thirty-fourth Congress in 1854, Trumbull was elected to the United States Senate before it began. He was reelected in 1861 and again in 1867, and served from March 4, 1855 to March 3, 1873. Trumbull evolved in political party affiliation at various junctions in his career, spending terms as a Democrat, a Republican, a Liberal Republican, and a Democrat again. Trumbull was also the Chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation) , Illinois Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Jasper D. Ward Visualize (February 1, 1829 — August 6, 1902) Jasper Delos Ward was an American politician, judge, and lawyer. Ward was born in Java, New York in 1829 and moved to Illinois in 1852. He attended Allegheny College, studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1852. While practicing law in Chicago, Ward also served on the board of aldermen of Chicago in 1855, 1856, 1859, and 1860. During the Civil War, he served in the Western Engineers Regiment and served for less than a year. After the war, he served for eight years in the State Senate, from 1862 to 1870. Ward was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875. After serving in Congress, he served as the U. S. Attorney for the northern district of Illinois until 1877, and then was appointed judge of the fifth judicial district of Colorado. He served in that capacity until 1882, when he moved to Denver, Colorado and practiced law until his death in 1902. [Source: “Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 - Present,” available at hhttps://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/W000135] Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)
Elihu B. Washburne Visualize (23 September, 1816 -- 23 October, 1887) Washburne was an American editor, lawyer, and politician. Born in Livermore, Androscoggin County, Maine, Washburne was admitted to the bar in 1840 and moved to Illinois. Washburne was elected as a Whig to the Thirty-third Congress and reelected as a Republican to the eight succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1853 to March 6, 1869. Washburne was appointed as Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President Grant, but resigned a few days afterward to accept a diplomatic mission to France. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774- Present', available at http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp] Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (The Road to Civil War) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation) , Illinois Delegation (United States Thirteenth Amendment 1863-65) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment)
Richard Yates Visualize "(January 18, 1815 -- November 1873) Richard Yates was a lawyer, governor, and American politician. He was born in Warsaw, Gallatin County, Kentucky and moved to Illinois in 1831. Yates studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1837. He was a member of the State house of representatives (1842-1845, 1848-1849). He was the governor of Illinois from 1861 to 1865 and was appointed as a United States Commissioner ,by President Ulysses Grant, to inspect a land subsidy railroad. Yates was elected as a Whig to the 32nd and 33rd Congresses (March 4, 1851 - March 3, 1855), and did not get reelected in 1854. He was not a successful candidate for election to the United States senate in 1863. He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate (March 4, 1865 - March 3, 1871) and served on the Committee on Revolutionary Claims (39th and 41st Congresses) and committee on territories (40th congress). He was not a candidate for reelection. [Source: 'Biographical Directory of the United States Congress', available at https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=Y000012]" Illinois Delegation (United States Fourteenth Amendment & The Civil Rights Act of 1866) , Illinois Delegation (United States Fifteenth Amendment) , Illinois Delegation (This negotiation)