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Fringe Meetings at the U.S. Consitutional Convention

Diary Record of an Informal Meeting - 13 July 1787

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Diary entry taken from Manasseh Cutler's, Life, Journals and Correspondence of Manasseh Cutler, I, 253-271.

Cutler suggests that some of the delegates taking supper together was a regular occurrence, which is not surprising. More so, is the recorded presence of Alexander Hamilton. This may have been an error, as Hamilton had left Philadelphia on 29 June to attend Congress in New York. He is not generally recorded as returning to the Convention until 13 August, however Cutler may have been correct and Hamilton may have been back in town briefly.

This meeting between delegates may well have been in order to discuss the question of representation then before the Convention. Cutler was heavily involved with settlement schemes in western lands, particularly the Ohio Company. It is interesting therefore that the next day in Convention the potential creation of western states is discussed.

Fringe Meetings at the U.S. Consitutional Convention

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Description

Diary entry taken from Manasseh Cutler's, Life, Journals and Correspondence of Manasseh Cutler, I, 253-271.

Cutler suggests that some of the delegates taking supper together was a regular occurrence, which is not surprising. More so, is the recorded presence of Alexander Hamilton. This may have been an error, as Hamilton had left Philadelphia on 29 June to attend Congress in New York. He is not generally recorded as returning to the Convention until 13 August, however Cutler may have been correct and Hamilton may have been back in town briefly.

This meeting between delegates may well have been in order to discuss the question of representation then before the Convention. Cutler was heavily involved with settlement schemes in western lands, particularly the Ohio Company. It is interesting therefore that the next day in Convention the potential creation of western states is discussed.

Content

Friday, July 13. This tavern (Indian Queen) is situated in Third Street, between Market Street and Chestnut Street, and is not far from the center of the city. It is kept in an elegant style, and consists of a large pile of buildings, with many spacious halls, and numerous small apartments, appropriated for lodging rooms. . . .

Being told, while I was at tea, that a number of the Members of the Continental Convention, now convened in this city for the purpose of forming a Federal Constitution, lodged in this house, and that two of them were from Massachusetts, immediately after tea, I sent into their Hall (for they live by themselves) to Mr. Strong, and requested to speak with him. We had never been personally acquainted, nor had I any letter to him, but we had both of us an hearsay knowledge of each other, and Mr. Gerry had lately mentioned to Mr. Strong that he daily expected me, in consequence of a letter he had received from Governor Bowdoin. Mr. Strong very politely introduced me to Mr. Gorham, of Charlestown, Mass; Mr. Madison and Mr. Mason and his son, of Virginia; Governor Martin, Hon. Hugh Williamson, of North Carolina; the Hon. John Rutledge and Mr. Pinckney, of South Carolina; Mr. Hamilton, of New York, who were lodgers in the house, and to several other gentlemen who were spending the evening with them. I spent the evening with these gentlemen very agreeably.

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Appendix A (Max Farrand, 1911)