Search Results (917)

Washington's diary entry from May 21 states that "Delaware State was represented." The credentials for the delegates from Delaware authorized George Read, Gunning Bedford, John Dickinson, Richard Bassett, and Jacob Broom "or any three of them" to represent Delaware at the Convention. Farrand notes Broom arriving on May 21, but in a May 23 letter to Thomas Collins, Broom says that "Mr. Read and [himself] [were] the only Deputies who have attended from [their] State until Monday evening last, wh
Also tagged as: Present, Members, States, Journal, State
Washington's diary entry from May 21 states that "Delaware State was represented." The credentials for the delegates from Delaware authorized George Read, Gunning Bedford, John Dickinson, Richard Bassett, and Jacob Broom "or any three of them" to represent Delaware at the Convention. Farrand notes Broom arriving on May 21, but in a May 23 letter to Thomas Collins, Broom says that "Mr. Read and [himself] [were] the only Deputies who have attended from [their] State until Monday evening last, wh
Also tagged as: Present, Members, States, Journal, State
Washington's diary entry from this day states that "Delaware State was represented." The credentials for the delegates from Delaware authorized George Read, Gunning Bedford, John Dickinson, Richard Bassett and Jacob Broom "or any three of them" to represent Delaware at the Convention. Farrand notes Broom arriving on May 21, but in a May 23 letter to Thomas Collins, Broom says that "Mr. Read and [himself] [were] the only Deputies who have attended from [their] State until Monday evening last, w
Also tagged as: Day, State, States, Present
Farrand notes King attending "as early as May 21" (See Farrand, The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, Vol. III, Appendix B). Farrand's account is corroborated by a letter from Gorham to Caleb Davis, which reads, "And no Gentleman having come forward but Mr. King and myself he is gone to Philadelphia and I continued here in order if possible to keep a Congress." Despite King's presence at the Convention, Massachusetts remained unrepresented as its credentials required that three delegate
Also tagged as: Present, Day, Congress, Constitute
〈when the following members appeared to wit: viz. From Massachusetts Rufus King. N. York Robert Yates, Alexr. Hamilton. N. Jersey, David Brearley, William Churchill Houston, William Patterson. Pennsylvania, Robert Morris, Thomas Fitzsimmons, James Wilson, Gouverneur Morris. Delaware, George Read, Richard Basset, Jacob Broom. Virginia, George Washington, Edmund Randolph, John Blair, James Madison, George Mason, George Wythe, James McClurg. N. Carolina, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davie,
Also tagged as: Members, Day, Encreased, Appointment, Present, State, Number, New, Constitute
〈when the following members appeared to wit: viz. From Massachusetts Rufus King. N. York Robert Yates, Alexr. Hamilton. N. Jersey, David Brearley, William Churchill Houston, William Patterson. Pennsylvania, Robert Morris, Thomas Fitzsimmons, James Wilson, Gouverneur Morris. Delaware, George Read, Richard Basset, Jacob Broom. Virginia, George Washington, Edmund Randolph, John Blair, James Madison, George Mason, George Wythe, James McClurg. N. Carolina, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davi
Also tagged as: Members, Day, Encreased, State, Present, Appointment, Number, New, Constitute
〈when the following members appeared to wit: viz. From Massachusetts Rufus King. N. York Robert Yates, Alexr. Hamilton. N. Jersey, David Brearley, William Churchill Houston, William Patterson. Pennsylvania, Robert Morris, Thomas Fitzsimmons, James Wilson, Gouverneur Morris. Delaware, George Read, Richard Basset, Jacob Broom. Virginia, George Washington, Edmund Randolph, John Blair, James Madison, George Mason, George Wythe, James McClurg. N. Carolina, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davi
Also tagged as: Members
〈when the following members appeared to wit: viz. From Massachusetts Rufus King. N. York Robert Yates, Alexr. Hamilton. N. Jersey, David Brearley, William Churchill Houston, William Patterson. Pennsylvania, Robert Morris, Thomas Fitzsimmons, James Wilson, Gouverneur Morris. Delaware, George Read, Richard Basset, Jacob Broom. Virginia, George Washington, Edmund Randolph, John Blair, James Madison, George Mason, George Wythe, James McClurg. N. Carolina, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davi
Also tagged as: Members
In fœderal-Convention. On Monday the 14th of May. ad 1787. and in the eleventh year of the independence of the United States of America, at the State-House in the city of Philadelphia — in virtue of appointments from their respective States, sundry Deputies to the fœderal-Convention appeared — but, a majority of the States not being represented, the Members present adjourned from day to day until friday the 25th of the said month, when, in virtue of the said appointments appeared from the State
Also tagged as: States, Appointments, Day, Majority, Present, United, Members, Respective
General 〈Washington〉 was accordingly unanimously elected by ballot, and conducted to the chair by Mr. R. Morris and Mr. Rutlidge; from which in a very emphatic manner he thanked the Convention for the honor they had conferred on him, reminded them of the novelty of the scene of business in which he was to act, lamented his want of 〈better qualifications〉, and claimed the indulgence of the House towards the involuntary errors which his inexperience might occasion.
Also tagged as: Elected, House, Act
Credentials for the State of Delaware
Also tagged as: Present, Votes, Journal, State
On reading the Credentials of the deputies it was noticed that those from Delaware were prohibited from changing the Article in the Confederation establishing an equality of votes among the States.
Also tagged as: Votes, States
Genl. Washington. In a very emphatic manner he thanked the Convention for the honor they had conferred on him, reminded them of the novelty of the scene of business in which he was to act, lamented his want of better qualifications, and claimed the indulgence of the House towards the involuntary errors which his inexperience might occasion. (The nomination came with particular grace from Penna, as Docr. Franklin alone could have been thought of as a competitor. The Docr. was himself to have m
On reading the Credentials of the deputies it was noticed that those from Delaware were prohibited from changing the Article in the Confederation establishing an equality of votes among the States.
The Convention met agreeably to adjournment —The honorable Nathaniel Gorham, and Caleb Strong Esquires, Deputies from the State of Massachusetts, The honorable Oliver Elsworth Esq, a deputy from the State of Connecticut — The honble Gunning Bedford Esq. a Deputy from the State of Delaware and The honorable James McHenry Esquire, a Deputy from the State of Maryland, attended and took their seats. Editors' note: The Massachusetts credentials required that three of the appointed delegates be pre
Also tagged as: Present, Appointed, Adjournment, State
The Convention met agreeably to adjournment —The honorable Nathaniel Gorham, and Caleb Strong Esquires, Deputies from the State of Massachusetts, The honorable Oliver Elsworth Esq, a deputy from the State of Connecticut — The honble Gunning Bedford Esq. a Deputy from the State of Delaware and The honorable James McHenry Esquire, a Deputy from the State of Maryland, attended and took their seats. Editors' note: The Massachusetts credentials required that three of the appointed delegates be pre
Also tagged as: State, Appointed, Present, Adjournment
The Convention met agreeably to adjournment —The honorable Nathaniel Gorham, and Caleb Strong Esquires, Deputies from the State of Massachusetts, The honorable Oliver Elsworth Esq, a deputy from the State of Connecticut — The honble Gunning Bedford Esq. a Deputy from the State of Delaware and The honorable James McHenry Esquire, a Deputy from the State of Maryland, attended and took their seats. Editors' note: The credentials for the Connecticut delegates states that "the said Delegates, and
Also tagged as: State, Time, Case, States, Present, Given, Adjournment
The Convention met agreeably to adjournment —The honorable Nathaniel Gorham, and Caleb Strong Esquires, Deputies from the State of Massachusetts, The honorable Oliver Elsworth Esq, a deputy from the State of Connecticut — The honble Gunning Bedford Esq. a Deputy from the State of Delaware and The honorable James McHenry Esquire, a Deputy from the State of Maryland, attended and took their seats.
Also tagged as: State, Adjournment
Credentials for the State of Massachusetts
Also tagged as: State, States, Vote, Number, Journal, Adjournment
Credentials for the State of Connecticut
Also tagged as: State, States, Number, Journal, Adjournment
Credentials for the State of Maryland
Also tagged as: State, States, Number, Journal, Adjournment
Proposed Rules and Standing Orders of the Convention
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Directed, Place, Proceedings, Proper
Rules and Standing Orders of the Convention
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Directed, Place, question, Amendments, Time, Proper
Rule 1
Also tagged as: Proper, Rules, Time, Proceedings, Place, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Proper, Rules, Time, Proceedings, Place, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Rule 2
Also tagged as: Proper, Time, Place, Rules, Proceedings, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Proper, Time, Place, Rules, Proceedings, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Rule 3
Also tagged as: Proper, Time, Place, Rules, Proceedings, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 4
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Directed, Place, question, Amendments, Time, Proper
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 5
Also tagged as: Proper, Time, Place, Rules, Proceedings, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 6
Also tagged as: Proper, Time, Place, Rules, Proceedings, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 7
Also tagged as: Proper, Time, Place, Rules, Proceedings, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 8
Also tagged as: Proper, Time, Place, Rules, Proceedings, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 9
Also tagged as: Proper, Rules, Place, Proceedings, question, Time, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Proper, Rules, Time, Proceedings, Place, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Rule 10
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Directed, Place, question, Amendments, Time, Proper
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 12
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Directed, Place, question, Amendments, Time, Proper
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Amendments, Directed, Place, question, Time, Proper
Rule 13
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Directed, Place, question, Amendments, Time, Proper
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Proper, Rules, Time, Proceedings, Place, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Rule 14
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Directed, Place, question, Amendments, Time, Proper
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Proper, Rules, Time, Proceedings, Place, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
Rule 15
Also tagged as: Rules, House, Second, Proceedings, Directed, Place, question, Amendments, Time, Proper
Mr Wythe reported from the Committee, (to whom the drawing up rules, proper in their opinion, to be observed by the Convention in their proceedings, as standing Orders, was referred) that the Committee had drawn up the rules accordingly, and had directed him to report them to the House — and he read the report in his place, and afterwards delivered it in at the Secretary’s table; where the said rules were once read throughout, and then a second time one by one; and upon the question severally pu
Also tagged as: Proper, Rules, Time, Proceedings, Place, question, Second, House, Amendments, Directed
〈John Dickenson [sic], and Elbridge Gerry, the former from Delaware, the latter from Massts. took their seats, Editors' note: On May 29, Dickinson writes to his wife, "I had a very pleasant Journey and am very well. My hopes of something good for our Country are strong. Virtue and Wisdom must be employed. May Heaven bless our Endeavours." Additionally, his copy of the Virginia Plan, proposed by Randolph on this day, has two major revisions, one to the second article and the other to the seven
Also tagged as: Second, Day
〈John Dickenson, and Elbridge Gerry, the former from Delaware, the latter from Massts. took their seats,
The Virginia Plan as Proposed
Also tagged as: Virginia Plan, Suffrage, Common Defense, General Welfare, Slavery, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, First Branch of National Legislature, Term Limits, State Sovereignty, Bicameral Legislature, Compensation, Veto, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Supreme Judiciary, Supreme Court, Lower Courts, Tribunal, Term of Office, Lifetime Appointment, Crime, Impeachment, State Legislature, State Legislatures, State Jurisdiction, New States, Amendment, Oath of Office
Virginia Plan
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Particular, Debts, Law, Members, Regulations, Power, Subject, Become, Foreign, Government, Treaties, Congress, Money, According, War, State, Union, Militia, Nations, Several
Mr. Randolph explains the intention of the 3d Resolution. Repeats the substance of his yesterdays observations. It is only meant to give the national government a power to defend and protect itself. To take therefore from the respective legislatures or States, no more soverignty than is competent to this end. Mr. Dickinson. Under obligations to the gentlemen who brought forward the systems laid before the house yesterday. Yet differs from the mode of proceeding to which the resolutions or pro
Also tagged as: Powers, States, Legislatures, Congress, House, Give, Government, Respective, Propose, Executive, Take, Laid, Power
Governeur Morris. Not yet ripe for a decision, because men seem to have affixed different explanations to the terms before the house. 1. We are not now under a fœderal government. 2. There is no such thing. A fœderal government is that which has a right to compel every part to do its duty. The fœderal gov. has no such compelling capacities, whether considered in their legislative, judicial or Executive qualities. The States in their appointments Congress in their recommendations point directl
Also tagged as: Supreme, Congress, States, Judicial, Different, Duty, Executive, Thing, Government, House, Years, Take, Party, Appointments
In order to carry into execution Mr. R. King — The object of the motion from Virginia, an establishment of a government that is to act upon the whole people of the U. S. The object of the motion from Delaware seems to have application merely to the strenghtening [sic] the confederation by some additional powers — Mr. Maddison [sic] — The motion does go to bring out the sense of the house — whether the States shall be governed by one power. If agreed to it will decide nothing. The meanin
Also tagged as: Day, States, Powers, Whole, Government, Power, Act, House
The motion to postpone for this purpose was lost: Yeas Massachusetts, Connecticut. Delaware S. Carolina — 4 Nays N. Y. Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina — 4>
On the question 〈as moved by Mr. Butler on the third proposition〉 it was resolved in Committee of the whole that a national Governt. ought to be established consisting of a supreme Legislative Executive & Judiciary.” Massts. being ay — Connect. no. N. York divided (Col. Hamilton ay Mr. Yates no) Pena. ay. Delaware ay. Virga. ay. N. C. ay. S. C. ay. [Ayes — 6; noes — 1; divided — 1.]
Also tagged as: Supreme, Whole, question, Executive
Mr. Reed moved that the whole clause relating to the point of Representation be postponed; reminding the Come. that the deputies from Delaware were restrained by their commission from assenting to any change of the rule of suffrage, and in case such a change should be fixed on, it might become their duty to retire from the Convention. Mr. Govr. Morris observed that the valuable assistance of those members could not be lost without real concern, and that so early a proof of discord in the conv
On the question to agree to the amendment it passed in the affirmative. [Ayes - 7; noes - 0.] Editors' note: Delaware appear to have not voted on this motion. This may be because they briefly dropped below quorum.
Also tagged as: question
Mr. Reed moved that the whole clause relating to the point of Representation be postponed; reminding the Come. that the deputies from Delaware were restrained by their commission from assenting to any change of the rule of suffrage, and in case such a change should be fixed on, it might become their duty to retire from the Convention. Mr. Govr. Morris observed that the valuable assistance of those members could not be lost without real concern, and that so early a proof of discord in the conven
Also tagged as: States, Case, State, House, Different, question, Members, Acts, Become, Vote, Union, Take, Whole, Require, Representatives, Legislatures, Several, Congress, Place, Act, Duty, Particular
It was finally agreed however that the clause should be postponed: it being understood that in the event the proposed change of representation would certainly be agreed to, no objection or difficulty being started from any other quarter 〈than from Delaware. The motion of Mr. Read to postpone being agreed to〉 The Committee then rose. Editors' note: the Journal records the following, "It was moved and seconded to postpone the consideration of the last resolution And on the question to postpo
Also tagged as: Journal, question
Mr. Butler apprehended that the taking so many powers out of the hands of the States as was proposed, tended to destroy all that balance and security of interests among the States which it was necessary to preserve; and called on Mr. Randolph the mover of the propositions, to explain the extent of his ideas, and particularly the number of members he meant to assign to this second branch. Mr. Randf. observed that he had at the time of offering his propositions stated his ideas as far as the na
Also tagged as: The States, State Sovereignty, State Legislatures, Senate, House of Representatives, Democratic Election, Democracy, Federalism
Mr. Butler apprehended that the taking so many powers out of the hands of the States as was proposed, tended to destroy all that balance 〈and security〉 of interests among the States which it was necessary to preserve; and called on Mr. Randolph the mover of the propositions, to explain the extent of his ideas, and particularly the number of members he meant to assign to this second branch. Mr. Randf. observed that he had at the time of offering his propositions stated his ideas as far as the
Also tagged as: Made, Members, Necessary, States, According, Powers, Proceedings, Time, State, Second, Provide, Give, Number, Stated, Legislatures, Senate
Mr. King reminded the Committee that the choice of the second branch as proposed (by Mr. Spaight) viz. by the State Legislatures would be impracticable, unless it was to be very numerous, or the idea of proportion among the States was to be disregarded. According to this idea, there must be 80 or 100 members to entitle Delaware to the choice of one of them.—Mr. Spaight withdrew his motion.
Also tagged as: Members, States, According, State, Second, Legislatures
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Sixth Resolution: Third Clause (Cases in which the Separate States are Incompetent)
Mr. Madison, observed that the more he reflected on the use of force, the more he doubted the practicability, the justice and the efficacy of it when applied to people collectively and not individually. — A Union of the States containing such an ingredient seemed to provide for its own destruction. The use of force agst. a State, would look more like a declaration of war, than an infliction of punishment, and would probably be considered by the party attacked as a dissolution of all previous com
Mr. 〈Madison〉, observed that the more he reflected on the use of force, the more he doubted the practicability, the justice and the efficacy of it when applied to people collectively and not individually. — , A Union of the States 〈containing such an ingredient〉 seemed to provide for its own destruction. The use of force agst. a State, would look more like a declaration of war, than an infliction of punishment, and would probably be considered by the party attacked as a dissolution of all previo
Also tagged as: Use, Union, States, Justice, Provide, Party, State, War, Punishment, Bound
Mr. Pinkney was for a vigorous Executive but was afraid the Executive powers of the existing Congress might extend to peace & war &c which would render the Executive a Monarchy, of the worst kind, to wit an elective one.
Also tagged as: Monarchy, Executive Power, Power of War
Mr. Pinkney [sic] was for a vigorous Executive but was afraid the Executive powers of 〈the existing〉 Congress might extend to peace & war &c which would render the Executive a Monarchy, of the worst kind, towit an elective one.
Also tagged as: War, Powers, Executive, Congress, Peace
A considerable pause ensuing and the Chairman asking if he should put the question, Docr. Franklin observed that it was a point of great importance and wished that the gentlemen would deliver their sentiments on it before the question was put. Mr. Rutlidge [sic] animadverted on the shyness of gentlemen on this and other subjects. He said it looked as if they supposed themselves precluded by having frankly disclosed their opinions from afterwards changing them, which he did not take to be at a
Also tagged as: Executive, Legislature, Number, War, Appointed, Powers, Power, Peace, question, Time, Person, Public, Office, Different, Necessary, Appoint, Take, Persons, Judges, Proper, Give, Consist, Case, Officers, Government, Laws, Supreme
A considerable pause ensuing and the Chairman asking if he should put the question, Docr. Franklin observed that it was a point of great importance and wished that the gentlemen would deliver their sentiments on it before the question was put. Mr. Rutlidge animadverted on the shyness of gentlemen on this and other subjects. He said it looked as if they supposed themselves precluded by having frankly disclosed their opinions from afterwards changing them, which he did not take to be at all the
CXVIII. William Pierce: Anecdote. When the Convention first opened at Philadelphia, there were a number of propositions brought forward as great leading principles for the new Government to be established for the United States. A copy of these propositions was given to each Member with the injunction to keep everything a profound secret. One morning, by accident, one of the Members dropt his copy of the propositions, which being luckily picked up by General Mifflin was presented to General
Also tagged as: Day, States, Public, Proceedings, Least, Members, New, Member, United, House, Adjournment, Government, Days, Number, Take, Presented, Given, President, question, Time, Rules, State, Person, First
Mr. Sherman was for three years, and agst. the doctrine of rotation as throwing out of office the men best qualified to execute its duties. Mr. Mason was for seven years at least, and for prohibiting a re-eligibility as the best expedient both for preventing the effect of a false complaisance on the side of the Legislature towards unfit characters; and a temptation on the side of the Executive to intrigue with the Legislature for a re-appointment. Mr. Bedford was strongly opposed to so long a
Also tagged as: Years, Period, Legislature, Impeachment, Office, Duties, Trial, Executive, Case, Appointment, Term
Mr. Sherman was for three years, and agst. the doctrine of rotation as throwing out of office the men best qualified to execute its duties. Mr. Mason was for seven years at least, and for prohibiting a re-eligibility as the best expedient both for preventing the effect of a false complaisance on the side of the Legislature towards unfit characters; and a temptation on the side of the Executive to intrigue with the Legislature for a re-appointment. Mr. Bedford was strongly opposed to so lon
The honorable William Samuel Johnson Esquire, a Deputy of the State of Connecticut, and the honorable Daniel of St Thomas Jenifer, a Deputy of the State of Maryland, and the honorable John Lansing junior a Deputy of the State of New-York attended and took their seats. Editors’ note: Farrand’s record of Lansing’s attendance at the Convention reads, “First attended on June 2, though he may have been present before May 25”. Farrand notes the rest of the New York delegation, Hamilton and Yate
Also tagged as: Places, Given, Day, States, According, Time, Place, Proceedings, Present, State, Journal, Votes, New, Constitute
The honorable William Samuel Johnson Esquire, a Deputy of the State of Connecticut, and the honorable Daniel of St Thomas Jenifer, a Deputy of the State of Maryland, and the honorable John Lansing junior a Deputy of the State of New-York attended and took their seats. Editors’ note: Farrand’s record of Lansing’s attendance at the Convention reads, “First attended on June 2, though he may have been present before May 25”. Farrand notes the rest of the New York delegation, Hamilton and Yates, a
Also tagged as: New, Present, Day, Time, States, Votes, State, Places, Journal, According, First, Place, Given, Constitute
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Seventh Resolution (Executive Branch): Franklin's Proposal on Compensation
Franklin's Amendment that the Executive Receive No Remuneration
Also tagged as: Time, Number, Government, Executive, Services, Money, Public, Made, Profit, Office, Think, Place, Duty, States, First, Years, Peace, Trust, Law, Give, Power, Receive, Places, Make, Present, Equal, State, Laid, Service, Proceedings
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Eighth Resolution: Gerry's Proposal on the Executive Veto
Also tagged as: Veto
Mr. Gerry doubts whether the Judiciary ought to form a part of it, as they will have a sufficient check agst. encroachments on their own department by their exposition of the laws, which involved a power of deciding on their Constitutionality. In some States the Judges had actually set aside laws as being agst. the Constitution. This was done too with general approbation. It was quite foreign from the nature of ye. office to make them judges of the policy of public measures. He moves to postpone
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Eighth Resolution: Wilson's Amendment to Gerry's Proposal on the Executive Veto
Also tagged as: Veto
Mr. Gerry sees no necessity for so great a controul over the legislature as the best men in the Community would be comprised in the two branches of it. Docr. Franklin, said he was sorry to differ from his colleague for whom he had a very great respect, on any occasion, but he could not help it on this. He had had some experience of this check in the Executive on the Legislature, under the proprietary Government of Pena. The negative of the Governor was constantly made use of to extort money.
Also tagged as: Single Executive, Veto, Council of Revision, Executive Corruption, Checks on Power, Cromwell, Catiline, Monarchy, Executive Power
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Eighth Resolution: Gerry's Proposal on the Executive Veto (Two Thirds Wording)
Also tagged as: Veto
Gerry's Alternative to the Eighth Resolution
Also tagged as: Judges, Laws, Public, Office, Foreign, Legislature, States, Make, Propose, Act, Law, Executive, Constitution, Power
It was then moved and seconded to postpone the consideration of the said clause in order to introduce the following resolution submitted by Mr Gerry namely “resolved that the national Executive shall have a right to negative any legislative act, which shall not be afterwards passed unless byparts of each branch of the national legislature.” and on the question to postpone it passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 4.] Editors' note: Madison records the even as follows, "On the question
Mr. Gerry sees no necessity for so great a controul over the legislature as the best men in the Community would be comprised in the two branches of it. Docr. Franklin, said he was sorry to differ from his colleague for whom he had a very great respect, on any occasion, but he could not help it on this. He had had some experience of this check in the Executive on the Legislature, under the proprietary Government of Pena. The negative of the Governor was constantly made use of to extort money.
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A question was then taken on the resolution submitted by Mr Gerry namely “resolved that the national executive shall have a right to negative any legislative act which shall not be afterwards passed unless by two third parts of each branch of the national legislature” And on the question to agree to the same it passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 8; noes — 2.]
Also tagged as: Executive, Act, Legislature, question
Mr. Wilson opposed the appointmt of Judges by the national Legisl: Experience shewed the impropriety of such appointmts. by numerous bodies. Intrigue, partiality, and concealment were the necessary consequences. A principal reason for unity in the Executive was that officers might be appointed by a single, responsible person. Mr. Rutlidge was by no means disposed to grant so great a power to any single person. The people will think we are leaning too much towards Monarchy. He was against esta
Also tagged as: Mode of Appointment, Single Executive, Monarchy, Supreme Judiciary, Supreme Court, Lower Courts, Scotland, Executive Appointment, Legislative Appointment, Senate
Mr. Wilson opposed the appointmt 〈of Judges by the〉 national Legisl: Experience shewed the impropriety of such appointmts. by numerous bodies. Intrigue, partiality, and concealment were the necessary consequences. A principal reason for unity in the Executive was that officers might be appointed by a single, responsible person. Mr. Rutlidge [sic] was by no means disposed to grant so great a power to any single person. The people will think we are leaning too much towards Monarchy. He was agai
Also tagged as: Executive, Think, electors, Give, Grant, Members, Different, Member, Officers, Power, Case, Made, Supreme, Cases, Appointment, Judges, Legislature, Necessary, Make, State, Appointed, Person, First
Mr. Gerry. Much depends on the mode of election. In England, the people will probably lose their liberty from the smallness of the proportion having a right of suffrage. Our danger arises from the opposite extreme: hence in Massts. the worst men get into the Legislature. Several members of that Body had lately been convicted of infamous crimes. Men of indigence, ignorance & baseness, spare no pains however dirty to carry their point agst. men who are superior to the artifices practiced. He was n
Also tagged as: Mode of Election, Suffrage, Aristocracy, Monarchy, The People, National Government, State Legislature, Election Districts, The States
Mr. Gerry. Much depends on the mode of election. In England, the people will probably lose their liberty from the smallness of the proportion having a right of suffrage. Our danger arises from the opposite extreme: hence in Massts. the worst men get into the Legislature. Several members of that Body had lately been convicted of infamous crimes. Men of indigence, ignorance & baseness, spare no pains however dirty to carry their point agst. men who are superior to the artifices practiced. He was n
Also tagged as: State, States, Legislatures, Necessary, Legislature, Majority, Power, Authority, Made, Whole, Senate, Foreign, Number, United, New, Powers, Money, Make, Sect, Become, Case, Citizens, Proper, Time, Office, Think, Representatives, Place, Subject, Years, Least
Butler — I am agt: determining the mode of election until the ratio of Representation is fixed — if that proceeds on a principle favorable to wealth as well as numbers of Free Inhabitants, I am content to unite wh. Delaware (Mr Read) in abolishing the State Legislatures, and becoming one Nation instead of a confedn. of Republics —
Also tagged as: State, Legislatures
Mr. Madison observed that the great difficulty in rendering the Executive competent to its own defence arose from the nature of Republican Govt. which could not give to an individual citizen that settled pre-eminence in the eyes of the rest, that weight of property, that personal interest agst. betraying the National interest, which appertain to an hereditary magistrate. In a Republic personal merit alone could be the ground of political exaltation, but it would rarely happen that this merit wou
Also tagged as: Executive Branch, Legislative Branch, Judicial Branch, Veto, Council of Revision, Supreme Court
Mr. Madison... He observed that the great difficulty in rendering the Executive competent to its own defence arose from the nature of Republican Govt. which could not give to an individual citizen that settled pre-eminence in the eyes of the rest, that weight of property, that personal interest agst. betraying the National interest, which appertain to an hereditary magistrate. In a Republic personal merit alone could be the ground of political exaltation, but it would rarely happen that this mer
Also tagged as: Made, Supreme, Justice, Foreign, Powers, Executive, War, Public, Power, Place, Act, Present, Subject, Give, Judges, Laws, Equal, Objections, Legislature, First
The Committee then rose. [Ayes — 11; noes — 0.] This is the first time that a vote is recorded regarding the motion to adjourn (which was put forward at the end of every session). This voting record shows that even this most obvious of procedural motions was likely voted on at the end of each session.
Mr. Read proposed “that the Senate should be appointed by the Executive Magistrate out of a proper number of persons to be nominated by the individual legislatures.” He said he thought it his duty, to speak his mind frankly. Gentlemen he hoped would not be alarmed at the idea. Nothing short of this approach towards a proper model of Government would answer the purpose, and he thought it best to come directly to the point at once. — His proposition was not seconded nor supported. Mr. Madison, if
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Proper, Executive, Give, Members, Different, Power, Subject, Made, Use, Become, Appointment, Number, Take, Senate, Legislature, Money, According, Whole, Place, State, Act, Appointed, Legislatures, Promote, Persons
Mr. Williamson was agst. giving a power that might restrain the States from regulating their internal police. Mr. Gerry cd. not see the extent of such a power, and was agst. every power that was not necessary. He thought a remonstrance agst. unreasonable acts of the States wd. reclaim them. If it shd. not force might be resorted to. He had no objection to authorize a negative to paper money and similar measures. When the confederation was depending before Congress, Massachusetts was then for
Also tagged as: Federalism, State Sovereignty, Checks on Power, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Veto, Negative, Suffrage, Representation, Proportional Representation
Mr. 〈Madison〉 seconded the motion. He could not but regard an indefinite power to negative legislative acts of the States as absolutely necessary to a perfect system. Experience had evinced a constant tendency in the States to encroach on the federal authority; to violate national Treaties, to infringe the rights & interests of each other; to oppress the weaker party within their respective jurisdictions. A negative was the mildest expedient that could be devised for preventing these mischiefs.
Also tagged as: States, Power, State, Cases, Case, Whole, Laws, Necessary, Give, Congress, Legislature, First, Least, Equal, Authority, question, New, Money, Acts, Made, Proper, Union, Time, Happen, Subject, Powers, Take, Exercise, Law, Supreme, Act, Person, Foreign
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Seventh Resolution: Gerry Proposes Election of the National Executive by the State Executives
Also tagged as: Mode of Election, Separation of Powers
Gerry's Amendment for the National Executive to be Chosen by State Executives
Also tagged as: Executive, States, Chosen, Legislature, Journal, State, Elected, According, Given, First, Necessary, Use, Give, Appointed, Votes, Appointment, Made, Different, Legislatures, question
Mr. Patterson moves that the Committee resume the clause relating to the rule of suffrage in the Natl. Legislature. Mr. Brearly seconds him. He was sorry he said that any question on this point was brought into view. It had been much agitated in Congs. at the time of forming the Confederation and was then rightly settled by allowing to each sovereign State an equal vote. Otherwise the smaller States must have been destroyed instead of being saved. The substitution of a ratio, he admitted carr
Also tagged as: Suffrage, Representation, National Legislature, Equal Representation, Proportional Representation, Small State, Large State, Usurpation, State Legislature, Parliament
Mr. Brearly... He was sorry he said that any question on this point was brought into view. It had been much agitated in Congs. at the time of forming the Confederation and was then rightly settled by allowing to each sovereign State an equal vote. Otherwise the smaller States must have been destroyed instead of being saved. The substitution of a ratio, he admitted carried fairness on the face of it; but on a deeper examination was unfair and unjust. Judging of the disparity of the States by the
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Proper, Representatives, Proceedings, Equal, United, Vote, Subject, Laws, Made, Thing, Government, Number, Make, Whole, question, Time, Act, State, Votes, New, Several
The question being abt. to be put Docr. Franklin sd. he had thrown his ideas of the matter on a paper wch. Mr. Wilson read to the Committee in the words following — Mr Chairman It has given me a great pleasure to observe that till this point, the proportion of representation, came before us, our debates were carried on with great coolness & temper. If any thing of a contrary kind, has on this occasion appeared. I hope it will not be repeated; for we are sent here to consult not to contend,
Also tagged as: Day, States, Public, Representatives, Least, Equal, Present, Particular, Give, Years, Members, Majority, Different, House, Case, Representative, Propose, Made, Constitution, Thing, Government, Number, Require, Necessary, Congress, Make, Money, War, Whole, question, Nations, State, Union, New
The question being abt. to be put Docr. Franklin sd. he had thrown his ideas of the matter on a paper wch. Mr. Wilson read to the Committee in the words following — Mr Chairman It has given me a great pleasure to observe that till this point, the proportion of representation, came before us, our debates were carried on with great coolness & temper. If any thing of a contrary kind, has on this occasion appeared. I hope it will not be repeated; for we are sent here to consult not to contend,
Also tagged as: Representation, Interests, Proportional Representation
Mr. Gerry. The idea of property ought not to be the rule of representation. Blacks are property, and are used to the southward as horses and cattle to the northward; and why should their representation be increased to the southward on account of the number of slaves, than horses or oxen to the north? Mr. Madison was of opinion at present, to fix the standard of representation, and let the detail be the business of a subcommittee. Madison copies this statement of Gerry's from Yates into his
Also tagged as: Property, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
He [Wilson] supposed that the impost will not be the only revenue — the post office he supposes would be another substantial source of revenue. He observed further, that this mode had already received the approbation of eleven states in their acquiescence to the quota made by congress. He admitted that this resolve would require further restrictions, for where numbers determined the representation a census at different periods of 5, 7 or 10 years, ought to be taken. Mr. Gerry. The idea of pro
Also tagged as: Revenue, Office, States, Present, Number, Congress, Years, Different, Require, Made
New Jersey Plan
Also tagged as: Made, Congress, States, Majority, Duty, Powers, Executive, United, Bound, Government, Place, State, Union, Give, House, New, Impeachment, Several
Mr. Lansing called for the reading of the 1st. resolution of each plan, which he considered as involving principles directly in contrast; that of Mr. Patterson says he sustains the sovereignty of the respective States, that of Mr. Randolph distroys it: the latter requires a negative on all the laws of the particular States; the former, only certain general powers for the general good. The plan of Mr. R. in short absorbs all power except what may be exercised in the little local matters of the St
Also tagged as: State Sovereignty, Constitutional Convention, National Government, Negative, Representation
Mr. Lansing called for the reading of the 1st. resolution of each plan, which he considered as involving principles directly in contrast; that of Mr. Patterson says he sustains the sovereignty of the respective States, that of Mr. Randolph distroys it: the latter requires a negative on all the laws of the particular States; the former, only certain general powers for the general good. The plan of Mr. R. in short absorbs all power except what may be exercised in the little local matters of the St
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Powers, Executive, Representatives, Least, Present, Particular, Give, Majority, Different, Power, Vote, Vested, Laws, Case, Objections, Propose, Cases, Made, Government, Take, Number, Legislature, Necessary, Congress, Make, Acts, According, Whole, Place, Time, State, Act, Consent, Appointed, Legislatures, Equal, Jurisdiction, Several, First
Mr. Hamilton, had been hitherto silent on the business before the Convention, partly from respect to others whose superior abilities age & experience rendered him unwilling to bring forward ideas dissimilar to theirs, and partly from his delicate situation with respect to his own State, to whose sentiments as expressed by his Colleagues, he could by no means accede. The crisis however which now marked our affairs, was too serious to permit any scruples whatever to prevail over the duty imposed o
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Virginia Plan, New Jersey Plan, Democracy, Corruption, Tyranny, National Executive, National Legislature, National Judiciary, Federalism, Monarchy, Term Limits, Negative, Veto, Executive Pardon, Mode of Appointment, Lifetime Appointment, Good Behavior, The States, Tribunal, Lower Courts, Compensation
Mr. Hamilton, had been hitherto silent on the business before the Convention, partly from respect to others whose superior abilities age & experience rendered him unwilling to bring forward ideas dissimilar to theirs, and partly from his delicate situation with respect to his own State, to whose sentiments as expressed by his Colleagues, he could by no means accede. The crisis however which now marked our affairs, was too serious to permit any scruples whatever to prevail over the duty imposed o
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Powers, Executive, Public, Present, Particular, Give, Years, Grant, Members, Different, Term, Power, Land, Subject, Laws, Case, Cases, Made, Become, Constitution, Foreign, Government, Senate, Citizens, Necessary, Justice, Make, Revenue, War, Whole, Time, question, State, Union, Equal
Mr. Hamilton. — To deliver my sentiments on so important a subject, when the first characters in the union have gone before me, inspires me with the greatest diffidence, especially when my own ideas are so materially dissimilar to the plans now before the committee — My situation is disagreeable, but it would be criminal not to come forward on a question of such magnitude. I have well considered the subject, and am convinced that no amendment of the confederation can answer the purpose of a good
Also tagged as: States, Exercise, Powers, Executive, Public, electors, Present, Give, Years, Law, Establish, Peace, Members, Different, Officers, United, Power, Subject, Laws, Office, Case, Propose, Made, Become, Respective, Foreign, Government, Receive, Take, Senate, Legislature, Necessary, Make, Congress, Revenue, Elected, War, Whole, Time, question, State, Chosen, Appointed, Union, Militia, Appoint, Several, First
Hamilton's Plan
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Mr. M〈adison〉. Much stress had been laid by some gentlemen on the want of power in the Convention to propose any other than a federal plan. To what had been answered by others, he would only add, that neither of the characteristics attached to a federal plan would support this objection. One characteristic, was that in a federal Government, the power was exercised not on the people individually; but on the people collectively, on the States. Yet in some instances as in piracies, captures &c. the
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Mr. Madison. Much stress had been laid by some gentlemen on the want of power in the Convention to propose any other than a federal plan. To what had been answered by others, he would only add, that neither of the characteristics attached to a federal plan would support this objection. One characteristic, was that in a federal Government, the power was exercised not on the people individually; but on the people collectively, on the States. Yet in some instances as in piracies, captures &c. the e
Also tagged as: Federal, New Jersey Plan
Wilson I dont agree that the Genl. Govt. will swallow up the states or yr. Government — I think they must be preserved they must be continued — they may live in harmony with the Genl. Government — our Country is too extensive for a single Govt. no Despot ever did govern a country so extensive — Persia is divided into 20 subordinate Govts. Rome governed by her Proconsuls — Alfred adopted the plan and formed societies of 10, to those of 100ds towns counties, &c — Objections to a general or n
Also tagged as: States, Union, Government, Exercise, State, Powers, Public, Citizens, Authority, Act, Think, Acts, War, Make, Peace, Propose, Equal, Day, Constitution, Office, Treason, Provide, Receive, Objections, electors, Power, Provided, Several
Mr. Wilson observed that by a Natl. Govt. he did not mean one that would swallow up the State Govts. as seemed to be wished by some gentlemen. He was tenacious of the idea of preserving the latter. He thought, contrary to the opinion of (Col. Hamilton) that they might 〈not〉 only subsist but subsist on friendly terms with the former. They were absolutely necessary for certain purposes which the former could not reach. All large Governments must be subdivided into lesser jurisdictions. as Examples
Also tagged as: States, State, War, Union, Whole, Made, Authority, Act, Place, Acts, Happen, Second, Objections, Equal, Make, Peace, Lay, First, Propose, Treaties, Time, Entered, Powers, Necessary
Mr. Wilson observed that by a Natl. Govt. he did not mean one that would swallow up the State Govts. as seemed to be wished by some gentlemen. He was tenacious of the idea of preserving the latter. He thought, contrary to the opinion of (Col. Hamilton) that they might not only subsist but subsist on friendly terms with the former. They were absolutely necessary for certain purposes which the former could not reach. All large Governments must be subdivided into lesser jurisdictions. as Examples
Also tagged as: National Government, State Legislatures, Jurisdiction, State Sovereignty, Independence, Union, Rome, Ancient World, Virginia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Small State, Large State, Consolidated government, Delaware, State of Nature, Confederation, Congress, Suffrage
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Second Resolution: Original
Mr. Lansing... He had already assigned two reasons agst. such an innovation as was proposed. 1. the want of competent powers in the Convention — 2. the state of the public mind. It had been observed by Mr. Madison in discussing the first point, that in two States the Delegates to Congs. were chosen by the people. Notwithstanding the first appearance of this remark, it had in fact no weight, as the Delegates however chosen, did not represent the people merely as so many individuals; but as formin
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Coercive power, Confederation, Corruption, Legislative Power, Mode of Election, National Government, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Republican, State Legislatures, State Sovereignty, Taxation
Mr. Lansing, observed that the true queston here was, whether the Convention would adhere to or depart from the foundation of the present Confederacy; and moved instead of 〈the 2d〉 Resolution “that the powers of Legislation be vested 〈in the U. States〉 in Congress”. . He had already assigned two reasons agst. such an innovation as was proposed. 1. the want of competent powers 〈in the Convention〉 — 2. the 〈state〉of the public mind. It had been observed by (Mr. M〈adison〉) in discussing the first p
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Regulation, Proper, Public, Representatives, Present, Particular, Give, Years, Provided, Members, Power, Subject, Vested, Case, Attained, Made, Foreign, Government, Stated, Legislature, Citizens, Offices, Necessary, Given, Congress, Make, Revenue, War, Whole, Nations, State, Chosen, Union, Trust, Legislatures, Votes, Equal, First
On motion of the Deputies of the State of Delaware the determination of the House on the second resolution reported from the Committee was postponed until to-morrow.
Postpone Second Resolution and Adjourn
Also tagged as: Second, Adjourn, State, House
Doctr. Johnson. On a comparison of the two plans which had been proposed from Virginia & N. Jersey, it appeared that the peculiarity which characterized the latter was its being calculated to preserve the individuality of the States. The plan from Va. did not profess to destroy this individuality altogether, but was charged with such a tendency. One Gentleman alone (Col. Hamilton) in his animadversions on the plan of N. Jersey, boldly and decisively contended for an abolition of the State Govts.
Also tagged as: Confederation, Divided sovereignty, National Government, National Jurisdiction, New Jersey Plan, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, State Government, State Jurisdiction, State Sovereignty, Virginia Plan
Doctr. Johnson. On a comparison of the two plans which had been proposed from Virginia & N. Jersey, it appeared that the peculiarity which characterized the latter was its being calculated to preserve the individuality of the States. The plan from Va. did not profess to destroy this individuality altogether, but was charged with such a tendency. One Gentleman alone (Col. Hamilton) in his animadversions on the plan of N. Jersey, boldly and decisively contended for an abolition of the State Govts.
Also tagged as: State, States, Made, Legislature, Legislatures, Members, Jurisdiction, Power, Case, Representatives, Objections, Authority, Least, Take, Given, Necessary, Give, Government, Particular, Second, Subject, Vote, Powers, Different, Union, Present, Equal, Chosen
Election of the 1st. branch “for the term of three years,” considered, Mr. Randolph moved to strike out, “three years” and insert “two years” — he was sensible that annual elections were a source of great mischiefs in the States, yet it was the want of such checks agst. the popular intemperance as were now proposed, that rendered them so mischievous. He would have preferred annual to biennial, but for the extent of the U. S. and the inconveniency which would result from them to the representa
Also tagged as: First Branch of National Legislature, House of Commons, House of Representatives, Length of Term
Mr. Wilson being for making the 1st. branch an effectual representation of the people at large, preferred an annual election of it. This frequency was most familiar & pleasing to the people. It would be not more inconvenient to them, than triennial elections, as the people in all the States have annual meetings with which the election of the National representatives might be made to coin —cide. He did not conceive that it would be necessary for the Natl. Legisl: to sit constantly; perhaps not ha
Also tagged as: States, Members, Representatives, Necessary, Made, Union, Time, Elected, Place, House, Years, Case, Make, Legislatures, electors, New, Trust, Coin, Regulations, Constitution
Mr. Elseworth, moved to substitute payment by the States out of their own Treasurys: observing that the manners of different States were very different in the Stile of living and in the profits accruing from the exercise of like talents. What would be deemed therefore a reasonable compensation in some States, in others would be very unpopular, and might impede the system of which it made a part. Mr. Williamson favored the idea. He reminded the House of the prospect of new States to the Westwa
Also tagged as: Compensation, State Treasury
Mr. Elseworth, moved to substitute payment by the States out of their own Treasurys: observing that the manners of different States were very different in the Stile of living and in the profits accruing from the exercise of like talents. What would be deemed therefore a reasonable compensation in some States, in others would be very unpopular, and might impede the system of which it made a part. Mr. Williamson favored the idea. He reminded the House of the prospect of new States to the Westwa
Also tagged as: States, State, Members, Legislatures, Different, Time, Compensation, Legislature, Whole, Made, Constitution, Treasury, Union, Services, Days, House, Proper, Make, Necessary, Service, Offices, Justice, Exercise, Think, Power, Term, Cases, Representatives
Mr. Ghorum moved to strike out the last member of 3 Resol: concerning ineligibility of members of 1st branch to offices, during the term of their membership & for one year after. He considered it as unnecessary & injurious. It was true abuses had been displayed in G. B. but no one cd. say how far they might have contributed to preserve the due influence of the Gov’t nor what might have ensued in case the contrary theory had been tried. Mr. Butler opposed it. this precaution agst. intrigue was
Also tagged as: Corruption
Mr. Ghorum moved to strike out the last member of 3 Resol: concerning ineligibility of members of 1st branch to offices, during the term of their membership & for one year after. He considered it as unnecessary & injurious. It was true abuses had been displayed in G. B. but no one cd. say how far they might have contributed to preserve the due influence of the Gov’t nor what might have ensued in case the contrary theory had been tried. Mr. Butler opposed it. this precaution agst. intrigue was
Also tagged as: Offices, War, Members, Public, Appointments, Time, Member, Necessary, Give, Consequence, Appointment, Made, Foreign, Case, Term, Congress, Take, Particular, Executive, Constitution
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Third Resolution: General Pinckney to Strike Out Ineligibility to State Offices
C.C. Pinckney's Amendment for Eligibility to State Offices
Also tagged as: Offices, Members, Legislature, States, War, Services, State, Attained, Particular
Mr. Rutlidge, was for preserving the Legislature as pure as possible, by shutting the door against appointments of its own members to offices, which was one source of its corruption. Mr. Mason. The motion of my colleague is but a partial remedy for the evil. He appealed to him as a witness of the shameful partiality of the Legislature of Virginia to its own members. He enlarged on the abuses & corruption in the British Parliament, connected with the appointment of its members. He cd. not supp
Also tagged as: Eligibility for Office, Corruption, Interests, Abuse, Legislative Appointment, Merit, Virtue
Mr. Butler. The proposed amendment does not go far enough. How easily may this be evaded. What was the conduct of George the second to support the pragmatic sanction? To some of the opposers he gave pensions — others offices, and some, to put them out of the house of commons, he made lords. The great Montesquieu says, it is unwise to entrust persons with power, which by being abused operates to the advantage of those entrusted with it. Governor Rutledge was against the proposed amendment. No
Also tagged as: Executive, Public, Years, Holding, Members, Officers, Power, Land, Vote, Second, House, Office, Made, Become, Senators, Government, Appointment, Legislature, Offices, Necessary, War, Time, State, Appointed, Person, Persons, Appointments, First
Mr. Pinkney spoke as follows. — The efficacy of the System will depend on this article. In order to form a right judgmt. in the case it will be proper to examine the situation of this Country more accurately than it has yet been done. The people of the U. States are perhaps the most singular of any we are acquainted with. Among them there are fewer distinctions of fortune & less of rank, than among the inhabitants of any other nation. Every freeman has a right to the same protection & security;
Also tagged as: Ancient World, Aristocracy, Executive, Legislative Power, Monarchy, Parliament
Mr. Pinkney 〈spoke as follows〉. — The efficacy of the System will depend on this article. In order to form a right judgmt. in the case it will be proper to examine the situation of this Country more accurately than it has yet been done. The people of the U. States are perhaps the most singular of any we are acquainted with. Among them there are fewer distinctions of fortune & less of rank, than among the inhabitants of any other nation. Every freeman has a right to the same protection & security
Also tagged as: Government, States, Power, State, Time, Equal, Whole, Powers, Constitution, New, Citizens, Proper, Executive, Different, Offices, Make, Public, United, Legislature, Subject, Present, Fill, Number, question, Laws, Necessary, Members, Place, First
Mr. Madison. In order to judge of the form to be given to this institution, it will be proper to take a view of the ends to be served by it. These were first to protect the people agst. their rulers: secondly to protect the people agst. the transient impressions into which they themselves might be led. A people deliberating in a temperate moment, and with the experience of other nations before them, on the plan of Govt. most likely to secure their happiness, would first be aware, that those char
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Bicameral Legislature, Checks on Power, Class, Consolidated government, Divided sovereignty, Eligibility for Office, Equal Representation, Excess of Democracy, Federal, House of Representatives, Interests, Length of Term, Multiple Terms, National Legislature, Representatives, Stability, Term Limits, Term of Office, Small State, Taxation
Mr. Madison. In order to judge of the form to be given to this institution, it will be proper to take a view of the ends to be served by it. These were first to protect the people agst. their rulers: secondly to protect 〈the people〉 agst. the transient impressions into which they themselves might be led. A people deliberating in a temperate moment, and with the experience of other nations before them, on the plan of Govt. most likely to secure their happiness, would first be aware, that those ch
Also tagged as: Public, Different, Give, Government, Citizens, Term, Subject, Years, Foreign, Nations, Made, Time, Given, Powers, Justice, Necessary, Think, Become, Senate, States, First, Equal, State, Require, Power, Period, Whole, Provide, Majority, Take, Persons, Present
Mr L. Martin contended at great length and with great eagerness that the General Govt. was meant merely to preserve the State Governts: not to govern individuals: that its powers ought to be kept within narrow limits; that if too little power was given to it, more might be added; but that if too much, it could never be resumed: that individuals as such have little to do but with their own States; that the Genl. Govt. has no more to apprehend from the States composing the Union while it pursues p
Also tagged as: Confederation, Large State, Mode of Representation, National Government, National Judiciary, National Jurisdiction, National Legislature, Small State, State Government, State of Nature
Mr L. Martin contended at great length and with great eagerness that the General Govt. was meant merely to preserve the State Governts: not to govern individuals: that its powers ought to be kept within narrow limits; that if too little power was given to it, more might be added; but that if too much, it could never be resumed: that individuals as such have little to do but with their own States; that the Genl. Govt. has no more to apprehend from the States composing 〈the Union〉 while it pursues
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Proper, Present, Debts, Give, Members, Different, New, Power, Vote, House, Laws, Case, Number, Citizens, Given, Justice, Make, Acts, War, State, Act, Consent, Union, Appoint, Votes, Equal, Inability
Mr. Dayton expressed great anxiety that the question might not be put till tomorrow; Governr. Livingston being kept away by indisposition, and the representation of N. Jersey thereby suspended. Mr. Williamson. thought that if any political truth could be grounded on mathematical demonstration, it was that if the states were equally sovereign now, and parted with equal proportions of sovereignty, that they would remain equally sovereign. He could not comprehend how the smaller States would be
Also tagged as: Large State, Mode of Representation, National Government, New States, Small State, State Sovereignty, Treaty
Mr. Dayton expressed great anxiety that the question might not be put till tomorrow; Governr. Livingston being kept away by indisposition, and the representation of N. Jersey thereby suspended. Mr. Williamson. thought that if any political truth could be grounded on mathematical demonstration, it was that if the states were equally sovereign now, and parted with equal proportions of sovereignty, that they would remain equally sovereign. He could not comprehend how the smaller States would be
Also tagged as: States, Case, Equal, Nations, State, Votes, Law, Members, Powers, Authority, question, Laws, Representatives, Subject, Give, Persons, Make, Require, Government, Constitution, Money, Cases, Different, Legislatures, Entitled, New, Necessary, First, Judgment, According, Least, Present
Proposed rules and standing orders for the Convention - Franklin's Proposal for Prayers
Also tagged as: Ancient World, Religion, Republic
Proposed rules and standing orders for the Convention - Randolph's Amendment
Franklin's Proposal for Prayer
Also tagged as: Different, Several, States, War, House, Labour, Made, Peace, Service, Become, President, Time, Presented, question, Government
Randolph's Amendment to Franklin's Proposal for Prayer
Also tagged as: Several, Vote, Give, Adjournment
Doctr. Johnson. The controversy must be endless whilst Gentlemen differ in the grounds of their arguments; Those on one side considering the States as districts of people composing one political Society; those on the other considering them as so many political societies. The fact is that the States do exist as political Societies, and a Govt. is to be formed for them in their political capacity, as well as for the individuals composing them. Does it not seem to follow, that if the States as such
Also tagged as: States, State, Union, Power, Different, Powers, Vote, Foreign, Member, Give, Make, Equal, Law, Public, Whole, Case, Government, Executive, Nations, War, Time, Necessary, Place, Subject, Votes, Take, Present, Given, Several, New, Particular, Laws, Become, Representatives, Meeting
Judge Elsworth. I now move the following amendment to the resolve — that in the second branch each state have an equal vote. I confess that the effect of this motion is, to make the general government partly federal and partly national. This will secure tranquility, and still make it efficient; and it will meet the objections of the larger states. In taxes they will have a proportional weight in the first branch of the general legislature — If the great states refuse this plan, we will be for e
Also tagged as: States, Government, Second, State, Made, Votes, Make, Equal, Congress, Vote, Legislature, Executive, Elected, According, First, Entered, Powers, Objections, Give, Take, Laws, Require, Constitution, Person, Union, Time, Necessary, Peace, United, Power, Day, question, Present, Several
Dr. Johnson. As the debates have hitherto been managed, they may be spun out to an endless length; and as gentlemen argue on different grounds, they are equally conclusive on the points they advance, but afford no demonstration either way. States are political societies. For whom are we to form a government? for the people of America, or for those societies? Undoubtedly for the latter. They must, therefore, have a voice in the second branch of the general government, if you mean to preserve thei
Also tagged as: Confederation, Divided sovereignty, National Government, Parliament, Proportional Representation, State Government, State Sovereignty
Judge Elsworth. I now move the following amendment to the resolve — that in the second branch each state have an equal vote. I confess that the effect of this motion is, to make the general government partly federal and partly national. This will secure tranquility, and still make it efficient; and it will meet the objections of the larger states. In taxes they will have a proportional weight in the first branch of the general legislature — If the great states refuse this plan, we will be for ev
Also tagged as: Divided sovereignty, Equal Representation, Executive, Large State, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Quotas of Contribution, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Small State
On the question to agree to the resolution it passed in the negative. [Ayes — 2; noes — 5; divided — 1.] Editors' note: Pennsylvania, Delaware and Georgia were absent for this vote, putting the number of voting delegations at eight.
The discussion of yesterday resumed. Mr. Wilson. The question now before us is of so much consequence, that I cannot give it a silent vote — Gentlemen have said, that if this amendment is not agreed to, a separation to the north of Pennsylvania may be the consequence. — This neither staggers me in my sentiments or my duty. If a minority should refuse their assent to the new plan of a general government, and if they will have their own will, and without it, separate the union, let it be done;
Also tagged as: The Revolutionary War, Aristocracy, Articles of Confederation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, Interests, Large State, Legislative Branch, Monarchy, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Slavery, Small State, Suffrage, The People, The States, Virginia Plan
Proposal for Consideration
Also tagged as: Equal Representation, Federalism, Legislative Branch, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Small State, Suffrage
On the question to agree to the resolution it passed in the negative. [Ayes — 2; noes — 5; divided — 1.] Editors' note: Delaware, Georgia and Pennsylvania were not quorate during this vote, putting the number of voting delegations at eight.
Also tagged as: Vote, Number, question
The motion of Mr. Elseworth resumed for allowing each State an equal vote in ye 2d branch Mr. Wilson did not expect such a motion after the establishment of ye. contrary principle in the 1st. branch; and considering the reasons which would oppose it, even if an equal vote had been allowed in the 1st. branch. The Gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Elseworth) had pronounced that if the motion should not be acceded to, of all the States North of Pena. one only would agree to any Genl. Government. H
Also tagged as: States, Majority, Votes, State, Vote, Given, Number, Power, Senate, Government, According, House, Necessary, Happen, Equal, Appointment, question, Legislatures, Members, Subject, Least, Chosen, Law, Constitution, Powers, Whole, Thing, Case, Cases, Representatives, Union, War, Objections, Stated, Take, Representative, Time
To adjourn Ayes — 11; noes — 0. The House adjourned till Monday next at 11 oClock a. m. Editors' note: Pennsylvania, Delaware and Georgia have returned, bringing the number of voting delegations back up to eleven.
Franklin's Senate Proposal for Consideration
Also tagged as: States, Several, Treasury, Equal, Money, Place, Officers, State, Authority, Public, Cases, Vote, Legislature, Number, Services, Votes, Respective, Appointment, Citizens, Made, Legislatures, Ministers, War, Government, Choose, Laws, New, Given, Senate, Constitution
Mr. Martin. Mr. Wilson’s motion or plan would amount to nearly the same kind of inequality. Mr. King. The Connecticut motion contains all the vices of the old confederation. It supposes an imaginary evil — the slavery of state governments. And should this convention adopt the motion, our business here is at an end. Capt. Dayton. Declamation has been substituted for argument. Have gentlemen shewn, or must we believe it, because it is said, that one of the evils of the old confederation was
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Equal, Present, Give, Grant, Majority, Different, New, United, Power, House, Entered, Made, Use, Foreign, Government, Take, Given, Congress, Imposts, Elected, War, State, Act, Union, Votes, Nations
General Pinkney proposed that a Committee consisting of a member from each State should be appointed to devise & report some compromise. Mr: L. Martin had no objection to a Commitment, but no modifications whatever could reconcile the Smaller States to the least diminution of their equal Sovereignty. Mr. Sharman. We are now at a full stop, and nobody he supposed meant that we shd. break up without doing something. A Committee he thought most likely to hit on some expedient. Mr. Govr. Mo
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Check on Power, Democracy, Executive, Large State, Lifetime Appointment, Property, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Separation of Powers, Small State, State Executive, State Government, State Legislatures, Union, Demagogue, Nepotism, Oligarchy
Mr: L. Martin had no objection to a Commitment, but no modifications whatever could reconcile the Smaller States to the least diminution of their equal Sovereignty. Mr. Sharman. We are now at a full stop, and nobody he supposed meant that we shd. break up without doing something. A Committee he thought most likely to hit on some expedient. Mr. Govr. Morris. thought a Come. advisable as the Convention had been equally divided. He had a stronger reason also. The mode of appointing the 2d. br
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Proper, Executive, Least, Present, Establish, Members, Different, Fill, House, Made, Foreign, Thing, Take, Senate, Offices, Necessary, Make, Money, War, Whole, State, Act, Chosen, Appointed, Trust, Legislatures, Appoint, Equal
a Committee by ballot was appointed of Mr Gerry, Mr Ellsworth, Mr Yates, Mr Paterson, Mr Franklin, Mr Bedford, Mr L Martin, Mr Mason, Mr Davie, Mr Rutledge and Mr Baldwin. Editors' note: Elected as a member of the First Committee on Representation for Delaware.
Also tagged as: Elected, Member, Appointed, First
Editors' note: In his, State of Facts (1788), included in a letter of 21 January 1788 to the Vice President of the Convention of Massachusetts, Elbridge Gerry set out his recollection of the debate on this report in the First Committee on Representation. The relevant section of which is copied below. "The number of forty thousand inhabitants to every member in the House of Representatives, was not a subject of much debate, or an object insisted on, as some of the Committee were opposed to it.
Also tagged as: States, Exercise, Powers, Public, Representatives, Least, Provided, Concurrence, Holding, Members, New, Member, Officers, Power, Subject, Vote, House, Amendments, Attained, Propose, Made, Removed, Tax, Constitution, Government, Number, Take, Ten, Senate, Legislature, Treasury, Offices, Revenue, Money, According, Bill, President, Bills, Time, State, Consent, Votes, Equal, Appointments, First
Mr. Ghorum observed that as the report consisted of propositions mutually conditional he wished to hear some explanations touching the grounds on which the conditions were estimated. Mr. Gerry. The Committee were of different opinions as well as the Deputations from which the Come. were taken, and agreed to the Report merely in order that some ground of accommodation might be proposed. Those opposed to the equality of votes have only assented conditionally; and if the other side do not genera
Also tagged as: Amendment, Equal Representation, Executive, Executive Branch, First Branch of National Legislature, Large State, Negative, Originating Money Bills, Power of the Purse, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Small State, Suffrage, Threat of Secession, Union, Veto, Anarchy
Blount, William, of North Carolina. Attended June 20—July 2; August 7 and thereafter. He was present in Congress in New York, July 4—August 3. Editors' note: Blount left to attend Congress in New York, likely alongside Few. He too would have had to leave after 2 July, so is shown leaving here on the first session afterwards.
Also tagged as: Congress, New, Present, First
Mr. Ghorum observed that as the report consisted of propositions mutually conditional he wished to hear some explanations touching the grounds on which the conditions were estimated. Mr. Gerry. The Committee were of different opinions as well as the Deputations from which the Come. were taken, and agreed to the Report merely in order that some ground of accommodation might be proposed. Those opposed to the equality of votes have only assented conditionally; and if the other side do not genera
Also tagged as: States, Foreign, State, Take, Make, Necessary, Consequence, Place, Whole, Bills, Justice, Different, First, Powers, Objections, Money, Amendments, House, Nations, Majority, Senate, Representative, Present, Public, Proceedings, Thing, question, Party, Particular, Made, Time, Think, Executive, Votes, Use, Years
Mr. Govr. Morris objected to that scale of apportionment. He thought property ought to be taken into the estimate as well as the number of inhabitants. Life and liberty were generally said to be of more value, than property. An accurate view of the matter would nevertheless prove that property was the main object of Society. The savage State was more favorable to liberty than the Civilized; and sufficiently so to life. It was preferred by all men who had not acquired a taste for property; it was
Also tagged as: Equitable Ratio of Representation, National Legislature, New States, Property, Proportional Representation, Representation, Suffrage, Union
Mr. Govr. Morris objected to that scale of apportionment. He thought property ought to be taken into the estimate as well as the number of inhabitants. Life and liberty were generally said to be of more value, than property. An accurate view of the matter would nevertheless prove that property was the main object of Society. The savage State was more favorable to liberty than the Civilized; and sufficiently so to life. It was preferred by all men who had not acquired a taste for property; it was
Also tagged as: States, Public, Representatives, Present, Particular, Years, Meeting, Different, Subject, Case, Made, Government, Number, Take, Legislature, Revenue, According, State, Union, Period, New, Several, First
Report of the Committee of Eleven of July 2nd [Resolutions] - First Proposal: First Clause - Rutledge's Replacement
Also tagged as: Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Suffrage
Rutledge's Amendment on Apportionment of Representation
Also tagged as: Made, Legislature, Revenue, States, According, Time, State, Present, Period, Take, Years, Meeting, Several, First
Mr. Ghorum apprehended great inconveniency from fixing directly the number of Representatives to be allowed to each State. He thought the number of Inhabitants the true guide; tho’ perhaps some departure might be expedient from the full proportion. The States also would vary in their relative extent, by separations of parts of the largest States. A part of Virga. is now on the point of a separation. In the province of Mayne a Convention is at this time deliberating on a separation from Masts. In
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Equal Representation, Equality, Equitable Ratio of Representation, Mode of Election, National Legislature, New States, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, The States
Mr. Ghorum apprehended great inconveniency from fixing directly the number of Representatives to be allowed to each State. He thought the number of Inhabitants the true guide; tho’ perhaps some departure might be expedient from the full proportion. The States also would vary in their relative extent, by separations of parts of the largest States. A part of Virga. is now on the point of a separation. In the province of Mayne a Convention is at this time deliberating on a separation from Masts. In
Also tagged as: States, Proper, Think, Representatives, Equal, Laid, Entitled, Exports, Consequence, Subject, Vote, Land, Made, Become, Number, Committed, Necessary, Revenue, War, Time, State, Union, Votes, New, Imports, First
Mr. Gerry thought it would be proper to proceed to enuerate & define the powers to be vested in the Genl. Govt. before a question on the report should be taken as to the rule of representation in the 2d. branch. Mr. 〈Madison,〉 observed that it wd. be impossible to say what powers could be safely & properly vested in the Govt. before it was known, in what manner the States were to be represented in it. He was apprehensive that if a just representation were not the basis of the Govt. it would h
Also tagged as: States, Case, Particular, New, Powers, Votes, Foreign, Majority, Vested, Whole, Consequence, United, Vote, Give, Bills, Money, Citizens, Made, Union, Equal, Second, Congress, Law, Proper, Constitution, Time
Mr. Gerry thought it would be proper to proceed to enumerate & define the powers to be vested in the Genl. Govt. before a question on the report should be taken as to the rule of representation in the 2d. branch. Mr. Madison, observed that it wd. be impossible to say what powers could be safely & properly vested in the Govt. before it was known, in what manner the States were to be represented in it. He was apprehensive that if a just representation were not the basis of the Govt. it would ha
Also tagged as: Anarchy, Articles of Confederation, Demagogue, Equal Representation, Faction, Large State, Mode of Representation, Originating Money Bills, Power of the Purse, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Small State, State Government, Suffrage, Union, Declaration of Independence, Diet, Germany, Interests, State Constitutions
Mr. Sherman moved to refer the 1st. part apportioning the Representatives to a Comme. of a member from each State. Mr. Govr. Morris seconded the motion; observing that this was the only case in which such Committees were useful. Mr. Williamson. thought it would be necessary to return to the rule of numbers. but that the Western States stood on different footing. If their property shall be rated as high as that of the Atlantic States, then their representation ought to hold a like proportio
Also tagged as: States, Number, State, According, Member, Meeting, Vote, Votes, Representatives, Place, Use, House, Take, Citizens, Proper, Different, Entitled, Act, Chosen, Legislature, Necessary, Whole, Power, Case, Justice, Term, Receive, Members
Mr. Williamson. thought it would be necessary to return to the rule of numbers. but that the Western States stood on different footing. If their property shall be rated as high as that of the Atlantic States, then their representation ought to hold a like proportion. Otherwise if their property was not to be equally rated. Mr Govr. Morris. The Report is little more than a guess. Wealth was not altogether disregarded by the Come. Where it was apparently in favor of one State whose nos. were su
Also tagged as: Property, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Large State, Slavery, Small State, Corruption, Equality, Interests, Suffrage, Republicanism
a Committee was appointed by ballot of. The honorable Mr King, Mr Sherman, Mr Yates, Mr Brearely, Mr G. Morris, Mr Read, Mr Carrol, Mr Madison, Mr Williamson, Mr Rutledge, and Mr Houston. Editors' note: Elected as a member of the Third Committee on Representation for Delaware.
Also tagged as: Elected, Appointed, Member
Mr Govr. Morris opposed it as fettering the Legislature too much. Advantage may be taken of it in time of war or the apprehension of it, by new States to extort particular favors. If the mode was to be fixed for taking a census, it might certainly be extremely inconvenient; if unfixt the Legislature may use such a mode as will defeat the object: and perpetuate the inequality. He was always agst. such Shackles on the Legislre. They had been found very pernicious in most of the State Constitutions
Also tagged as: Census, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, New States, Proportional Representation, Representation, State Constitutions
Mr Govr. Morris opposed it as fettering the Legislature too much. Advantage may be taken of it in time of war or the apprehension of it, by new States to extort particular favors. If the mode was to be fixed for taking a census, it might certainly be extremely inconvenient; if unfixt the Legislature may use such a mode as will defeat the object: and perpetuate the inequality. He was always agst. such Shackles on the Legislre. They had been found very pernicious in most of the State Constitutions
Also tagged as: Time, Legislature, States, Majority, New, War, Use, State, Votes, Think, Particular, Case, Power
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Williamson's Proposal
Also tagged as: Census, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Proportional Representation, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
The amendment offered to the second paragraph of the report from the Committee, consisting of Mr G. Morris, Mr Gorham, Mr Randolph Mr Rutledge and Mr King, being withdrawn — It was moved and seconded to substitute the following resolution, namely. “Resolved That in order to ascertain the alterations that may happen in the population and wealth of the several States a census shall be taken of the free inhabitants of each State, and three fifths of the inhabitants of other description on the fi
Also tagged as: States, Public, Equal, Years, Meeting, Entitled, Duty, Term, Power, Second, Case, Happen, Government, Number, Stated, Take, Require, Legislature, Justice, Place, State, Votes, New, Several
Williamson's Amendment for a Census
Also tagged as: States, Public, Equal, Years, Meeting, Entitled, Duty, Term, Power, Second, Case, Happen, Government, Number, Stated, Take, Require, Legislature, Justice, Place, State, Votes, New, Several
Mr. Sherman thought the number of people alone the best rule for measuring wealth as well as representation; and that if the Legislature were to be governed by wealth, they would be obliged to estimate it by numbers. He was at first for leaving the matter wholly to the discretion of the Legislature; but he had been convinced by the observations of (Mr. Randolph & Mr. Mason) that the periods & the rule of revising the Representation ought to be fixt by the Constitution. Mr. Reid thought the Le
Also tagged as: Amendment, Census, Interests, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, National Treasury, New States, Northern States, Property, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representatives, Southern States, Taxation, Union
Mr. Sherman thought the number of people alone the best rule for measuring wealth as well as representation; and that if the Legislature were to be governed by wealth, they would be obliged to estimate it by numbers. He was at first for leaving the matter wholly to the discretion of the Legislature; but he had been convinced by the observations of (Mr. Randolph & Mr. Mason) that the periods & the rule of revising the Representation ought to be fixt by the Constitution Mr. Reid thought the Leg
Also tagged as: Legislature, States, Power, Different, Time, Majority, Representatives, Labour, Constitution, Case, Bound, Places, Objections, Exports, First, Give, Years, Money, Thing, Make, Present, State, Subject, Public, Justice, Number
The next clause as to three-fifths of the negroes considered, Mr. King. being much opposed to fixing numbers as the rule of representation, was particularly so on account of the blacks. He thought the admission of them along with Whites at all, would excite great discontents among the States having no slaves. He had never said as to any particular point that he would in no event acquiesce in & support it; but he wd. say that if in any case such a declaration was to be made by him, it would be
Also tagged as: Census, Mode of Representation, New States, Northern States, Property, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Slavery, Southern States, State Legislature, Three-Fifths Compromise
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Williamson's Proposal (Working Version): "First Year" Clause
Also tagged as: Census
the next clause as to ⅗ of the negroes considered Mr. King. being much opposed to fixing numbers as the rule of representation, was particularly so on account of the blacks. He thought the admission of them along with Whites at all, would excite great discontents among the States having no slaves. He had never said as to any particular point that he would in no event acquiesce in & support it; but he wd. say that if in any case such a declaration was to be made by him, it would be in this. He
Also tagged as: States, Number, Citizens, Made, Give, Given, Necessary, Respective, Persons, Case, Legislature, Entitled, Public, State, Representatives, Different, Particular
Williamson's Proposition for a Census: Third Clause
Also tagged as: Government, Term, Years, First
Mr. Elseworth. In order to carry into effect the principle established, moved 〈to add to the last clause adopted by the House the words following “and that the rule of contribution by direct taxation for the support of the Government of the U. States shall be the number of white inhabitants, and three fifths of every other description in the several States, until some other rule that shall more accurately ascertain the wealth of the several States can be devised and adopted by the Legislature”〉
Also tagged as: Day, Congress, States, According, Term, Several, Direct, Government, Power, Time, Require, Committed, Number, Years, Meeting, Provided, House, Legislature, First
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Randolph/Elsworth Census Proposal
Also tagged as: Census, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Property, Proportional Representation, Suffrage, Representation
Randolph's Renewed Amendment for a Census
Also tagged as: States, United, Time, Legislature, Years, Second, Meeting, According, Journal, Term, Number, Congress, Day
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Second Proposal: Wilson's Reworking
Also tagged as: Census, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Property, Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, Taxation, The States
Wilson's Revised Amendment for a Census
Also tagged as: Direct, States, According, Time, Legislature, Years, United, Provided, Meeting, Term, Congress, House, Whole, Make, Enter, Attained
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Randolph/Elsworth Census Proposal: Pinckney Removes Three-Fifths
Also tagged as: Equal Representation, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Northern States, Property, Representation, Secession, Southern States, Suffrage, Taxation, The States
Pinckney's Motion to Strike Out the 'Three Fifths' Clause
Also tagged as: Journal, According, Vote, Votes, Congress
On the question to agree to the clause, as amended, namely “Provided always that representation ought to be proptioned according to direct Taxation and in order to ascertain the alteration in the direct Taxation which may be required from time to time by the changes in the relative circumstances of the States, resolved that a Census be taken within six years from the first meeting of the Legislature of the United States and once within the term of every Ten years afterwards of all the inhabit
On the question to agree to the clause, as amended, namely “Provided always that representation ought to be proptioned according to direct Taxation and in order to ascertain the alteration in the direct Taxation which may be required from time to time by the changes in the relative circumstances of the States — Resolved that a Census be taken within six years from the first meeting of the Legislature of the United States and once within the term of every Ten years afterwards of all the inhabi
Also tagged as: Congress, States, According, Term, United, Direct, Time, question, Years, Meeting, Provided, Legislature
Mr. Williamson feared that N. Hamshire will have reason to complain. 3 members were allotted to her as a liberal allowance for this reason among others, that she might not suppose any advantage to have been taken of her absence. As she was still absent, and had no opportunity of deciding whether she would chuse to retain the number on the condition, of her being taxed in proportion to it, he thought the number ought to be reduced from three to two, before the question on Mr. G’s motion. Mr. R
Also tagged as: Census, Equality, Equitable Ratio of Representation, Large State, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Northern States, Property, Proportional Representation, Representation, Small State, Southern States, Suffrage, Taxation
Mr. Williamson feared that N. Hamshire will have reason to complain. 3 members were allotted to her as a liberal allowance for this reason among others, that she might not suppose any advantage to have been taken of her absence. As she was still absent, and had no opportunity of deciding whether she would chuse to retain the number on the condition, of her being taxed in proportion to it, he thought the number ought to be reduced from three to two, before the question on Mr. G’s motion Mr. Re
Also tagged as: Made, Entered, Members, Justice, States, Lay, According, Member, Regulation, Representatives, question, State, Present, Number, Take, Receive, Case, Legislature
Mr. Govr. Morris opposed the alteration as leaving still an incoherence. If Negroes were to be viewed as inhabitants, and the revision was to proceed on the principle of numbers of inhabts. they ought to be added in their entire number, and not in the proportion of 3/5. If as property, the word wealth was right, and striking it out would. produce the very inconsistency which it was meant to get rid of. — The train of business & the late turn which it had taken, had led him he said, into deep med
Also tagged as: Colonies, Equal Representation, Equality, First Branch of National Legislature, Northern States, Property, Representation, Secession, Second Branch of National Legislature, Slavery, Southern States, Suffrage, Union, Civil Rights, Eastern States, Middle States
Mr. Govr. Morris opposed the alteration as leaving still an incoherence. If Negroes were to be viewed as inhabitants, and the revision was to proceed on the principle of numbers of inhabts. they ought to be added in their entire number, and not in the proportion of 8/5. If as property, the word wealth was right, and striking it out would. produce the very inconsistency which it was meant to get rid of. — The train of business & the late turn which it had taken, had led him he said, into deep med
Also tagged as: States, Majority, Power, Take, Entitled, State, Time, Number, War, According, First, Vote, Proper, Equal, Public, Union, Period, Provide, Thing, Case
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Read on Addition of Territory
Also tagged as: New States
Read's Amendment on Representation if States' Gain Territory
Also tagged as: Cases, Provide, States
Report of the Second Committee on Representation Accepted
Also tagged as: Second, Bills, Money, Whole, First, question, Votes
Whole Question Called For
Also tagged as: Money, Whole, Bills, question, Second, Votes, First
Madison says that at the opening of the session "Mr. L. Martin called for the question on the whole report, including the parts relating to the origination of money bills, and the equality of votes in the 2d. branch." From the subsequent actions of the Convention, it is clear from this point onwards that they had finished amending the Propositions of the Second Committee on Representation and had now accepted them as the revised First Clause of the original propositions on representation off
Also tagged as: Money, Whole, Bills, question, Second, Votes, First
Report of the Committee of Eleven of July 2nd [Resolutions] - Second Proposal: Reapportionment of Representatives
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Legislative Branch, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Proportional Representation, Representation, Representatives, Second Branch of National Legislature
Mr. Dayton. The smaller States can never give up their equality. For himself he would in no event yield that security for their rights. Mr. Sherman urged the equality of votes not so much as a security for the small States; as for the State Govts. which could not be preserved unless they were represented & had a negative in the Genl. Government. He had no objection to the members in the 2d b. voting per capita, as had been suggested by Mr. Gerry. Mr. Madison concurred in the motion of Mr.
Also tagged as: Coercive power, Confederation, Constitutional Convention, Equal Representation, Equitable Ratio of Representation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, General Government, House of Representatives, Judicial Branch, Large State, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Mode of Representation, National Government, National Legislature, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Small State, Southern States, The Confederation
Pinckney's Composition of the Senate
Also tagged as: Members, Entered, States, Whole, Second, Number, Take, Votes, New, Senate, Legislature
Mr. Dayton. The smaller States can never give up their equality. For himself he would in no event yield that security for their rights. Mr. Sherman urged the equality of votes not so much as a security for the small States; as for the State Govts. which could not be preserved unless they were represented & had a negative in the Genl. Government. He had no objection to the members in the 2d b. voting per capita, as had been suggested by (Mr. Gerry) Mr — 〈Madison〉 concurred in the motion 〈
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Representatives, Give, Members, Majority, Duty, Vote, Subject, Case, Objections, Cases, Made, Government, Take, Ten, Legislature, Necessary, Congress, Money, According, Times, Bills, Place, Time, State, Act, Appointed, Votes, Equal, First
Mr. Governr. Morris was pointedly agst. his being so chosen. He will be the mere creature of the Legisl: if appointed & impeachable by that body. He ought to be elected by the people at large, by the freeholders of the Country. That difficulties attend this mode, he admits. But they have been found superable in N. Y. &. in Cont. and would he believed be found so, in the case of an Executive for the U. States. If the people should elect, they will never fail to prefer some man of distinguished ch
Mr. Sherman thought that the sense of the Nation would be better expressed by the Legislature, than by the people at large. The latter will never be sufficiently informed of characters, and besides will never give a majority of votes to any one man. They will generally vote for some man in their own State, and the largest State will have the best chance for the appointment. If the choice be made by the Legislre. A majority of voices may be made necessary to constitute an election. Mr. Wilson.
Also tagged as: States, Executive, Representatives, electors, Least, Trial, Public, Present, Particular, Majority, Different, Power, Vote, Laws, Case, Objections, Made, Cases, Supreme, Respective, Happen, Appointment, Stated, Committed, Legislature, Offices, Necessary, Times, Place, Time, State, Votes, Entitled, Appointments
Mr. Govr. Morris espoused the motion. The ineligibility proposed by the clause as it stood tended to destroy the great motive to good behavior, the hope of being rewarded by a re-appointment. It was saying to him, make hay while the sun shines.
Also tagged as: Make
Mr. Govr. Morris espoused the motion. The ineligibility proposed by the clause as it stood tended to destroy the great motive to good behavior, the hope of being rewarded by a re-appointment. It was saying to him, make hay while the sun shines.
Mr. Govr. Morris 2ded. the motion. He expressed great pleasure in hearing it. This was the way to get a good Government. His fear that so valuable an ingredient would not be attained had led him to take the part he had done. He was indifferent how the Executive should be chosen, provided he held his place by this tenure. Mr. Broome highly approved the motion. It obviated all his difficulties. Mr. Sherman considered such a tenure as by no means safe or admissible. As the Executive Magistrat
Also tagged as: Executive, Legislature, Laws, Time, Powers, Judges, Subject, Union, Make, Made, Trial, Office, Necessary, Power, Establish, According, First, Majority, Vote, House, Take, State, Proper, Appoint, Places, Least, Legislatures, States, Entitled, Public
Docr. McClurg moved to strike out 7 years, and insert “during good behavior”. By striking out the words declaring him not re-eligible, he was put into a situation that would keep him dependent for ever on the Legislature; and he conceived the independence of the Executive to be equally essential with that of the Judiciary department. Mr. Govr. Morris 2ded. the motion. He expressed great pleasure in hearing it. This was the way to get a good Government. His fear that so valuable an ingredient
Tenth Resolution (Executive Veto)
Also tagged as: Executive, Power
Mr. Govr. Morris...thought the Legislature ought to be at liberty to increase salaries as circumstances might require, and that this would not create any improper dependence in the Judges. Docr. Franklin was in favor of the motion. Money may not only become plentier, but the business of the department may increase as the Country becomes more populous. Mr. Madison. The dependence will be less if the increase alone should be permitted, but it will be improper even so far to permit a dependen
Also tagged as: Compensation, Legislative Power, National Judiciary, National Treasury, Separation of Powers, Supreme Court
Mr. Govr. Morris moved to strike out “or increase”. He thought the Legislature ought to be at liberty to increase salaries as circumstances might require, and that this would not create any improper dependence in the Judges. Docr. Franklin 〈was in favor of the motion〉, Money may not only become plentier, but the business of the department may increase as the Country becomes more populous. Mr. 〈Madison.〉 The dependence will be less if the increase alone should be permitted, but it will be i
Also tagged as: Members, Supreme, Become, Money, Court, Compensation, Thing, State, Require, Office, Provide, Number, Judges, Provided, Persons, Legislature
On reconsideration of the vote rendering the Executive re-eligible a 2d. time, Mr. Martin moved to reinstate the words “to be ineligible a 2d. time”. Mr. Governeur Morris. It is necessary to take into one view all that relates to the establishment of the Executive; on the due formation of which must depend the efficacy & utility of the Union among the present and future States. It has been a maxim in political Science that Republican Government is not adapted to a large extent of Country,
Also tagged as: Executive, Legislature, States, Time, Appointment, Appointed, Public, Make, electors, Power, Officers, Constitution, Office, Elected, Powers, Give, Chosen, Subject, War, Justice, Appoint, Whole, Case, State, Vote, Union, Necessary, Objections, Provide, Court, Duty, Years, Take, Money, Think, Exercise, Present
Mr. Governeur Morris. It is necessary to take into one view all that relates to the establishment of the Executive; on the due formation of which must depend the efficacy & utility of the Union among the present and future States. It has been a maxim in political Science that Republican Government is not adapted to a large extent of Country, because the energy of the Executive Magistracy can not reach the extreme parts of it. Our Country is an extensive one. We must either then renounce the bles
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Executive, Executive Appointment, Executive Branch, Executive Corruption, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Impeachment, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Length of Term, Lifetime Appointment, Mode of Election, National Legislature, Northern States, Republican, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate, Separation of Powers, Slavery, Southern States, Term Limits, Union
Gerry's Amendment to the Apportionment of Electors
Also tagged as: Entered, Supreme, Executive, electors, Number, Journal, Take, New, First
Mr. Pinkney & Mr Govr. Morris moved to strike out this part of the Resolution. Mr P. observd. he ought not to be impeachable whilst in office Mr. Davie. If he be not impeachable whilst in office, he will spare no efforts or means whatever to get himself re-elected. He considered this as an essential security for the good behaviour of the Executive. Mr Wilson concurred in the necessity of making the Executive impeachable whilst in office. Mr. Govr. Morris. He can do no criminal act witho
Also tagged as: Check on Power, Checks on Power, Corruption, Crime, Electors, Good Behavior, Impeachment, Judicial Branch, Length of Term, Lifetime Appointment, Magistracy, Military, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, National Treasury, Parties, President, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate, Separation of Powers, Term Limits, Tyranny, Treason, War, War Powers
Mr. Davie. If he be not impeachable whilst in office, he will spare no efforts or means whatever to get himself re-elected. He considered this as an essential security for the good behaviour of the Executive. Mr Wilson concurred in the necessity of making the Executive impeachable whilst in office. Mr. Govr. Morris. He can do no criminal act without Coadjutors who may be punished. In case he should be re-elected, that will be sufficient proof of his innocence. Besides who is to impeach? Is
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Executive, Think, Public, electors, Provided, Years, Members, Places, Service, Term, Power, Removal, Subject, Office, Case, Party, Cases, Made, Punishment, Foreign, Constitution, Appointment, Behaviour, Take, Judges, Committed, Impeachment, Legislature, Offices, Justice, Make, Crimes, Money, War, Elected, Whole, Place, Time, Act, Trust, Provide, Period, First
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Tenth Resolution
Also tagged as: Executive Authority, Legislative Authority, Negative, Veto
Mr. Wilson. This proposition had been before made, and failed; but he was so confirmed by reflection in the opinion of its utility, that he thought it incumbent on him to make another effort: The Judiciary ought to have an opportunity of remonstrating agst projected encroachments on the people as well as on themselves. It had been said that the Judges, as expositors of the Laws would have an opportunity of defending their constitutional rights. There was weight in this observation; but this powe
Also tagged as: Check on Power, Checks on Power, Corruption, Council of Revision, Executive, Executive Authority, Executive Branch, Executive Power, Interests, Judicial Authority, Judicial Branch, Laws, Legislative Authority, Mode of Representation, National Executive, National Government, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Negative, Paper Money, Parliament, Separation of Powers, The People, The States, Veto
Mr. Wilson moved as an amendment to Resoln: 10. that the 〈supreme〉 Natl Judiciary should be associated with the Executive in the Revisionary power”. This proposition had been before made, and failed; but he was so confirmed by reflection in the opinion of its utility, that he thought it incumbent on him to make another effort: The Judiciary ought to have an opportunity of remonstrating agst projected encroachments on the people as well as on themselves. It had been said that the Judges, as expos
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Executive, Proper, Public, Think, Least, Give, Law, Members, Power, Laws, Case, Objections, Made, Cases, Use, Constitution, Judges, Legislature, Necessary, Acts, According, War, Bills, question, Act, Union, Persons
It was moved and seconded to agree to the 10th resolution, as reported from the Committee of the whole House, namely Resolved that the national Executive shall have a right to negative any legislative act, which shall not be afterwards passed unless by two third parts of each Branch of the national Legislature. which passed unanimously in the affirmative [Ayes — 9; noes — 0.]
It was moved and seconded to agree to the 10th resolution, as reported from the Committee of the whole House, namely Resolved that the national Executive shall have a right to negative any legislative act, which shall not be afterwards passed unless by two third parts of each Branch of the national Legislature. which passed unanimously in the affirmative [Ayes — 9; noes — 0.]
Also tagged as: House, Legislature, Act, Whole, Executive
Col. Mason considered a reference of the plan to the authority of the people as one of the most important and essential of the Resolutions. The Legislatures have no power to ratify it. They are the mere creatures of the State Constitutions, and cannot be greater than their creators. And he knew of no power in any of the Constitutions, he knew there was no power in some of them, that could be competent to this object. Whither then must we resort? To the people with whom all power remains that has
Also tagged as: Amendment, Articles of Confederation, Confederation, Constitutional Convention, Debt, Demagogue, Eastern States, Legislative Authority, National Government, National Supremacy, Ratification, State Constitutions, State Legislature, State Legislatures, The People, Union
Col. Mason considered a reference of the plan to the authority of the people as one of the most important and essential of the Resolutions. The Legislatures have no power to ratify it. They are the mere creatures of the State Constitutions, and cannot be greater than their creators. And he knew of no power in any of the Constitutions, he knew there was no power in some of them, that could be competent to this object. Whither then must we resort? To the people with whom all power remains that has
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Powers, Regulation, Public, Equal, Present, Particular, Law, Concurrence, Members, Majority, Power, Subject, Case, Objections, Made, Supreme, Constitution, Thing, Government, Judges, Take, Number, Legislature, Given, Necessary, Make, Acts, Elected, State, Act, Consent, Union, Chosen, Legislatures, New
Mr. Govr. Morris moved to fill the blank with three. He wished the Senate to be a pretty numerous body. If two members only should be allowed to each State, and a majority be made a quorum the power would be lodged in 14 members, which was too small a number for such a trust. Mr Ghorum preferred two to three members for the blank. A small number was most convenient for deciding on peace & war &c. which he expected would be vested in the 2d. branch. The number of States will also increase. Ken
Also tagged as: Equal Representation, Equitable Ratio of Representation, General Government, Power of War, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr Ghorum preferred two to three members for the blank. A small number was most convenient for deciding on peace & war &c. which he expected would be vested in the 2d. branch. The number of States will also increase. Kentucky, Vermont, the province of Mayne & Franklin will probably soon be added to the present number. He presumed also that some of the largest States would be divided. The strength of the general Govt. will lie not in the largeness, but in the smallness of the States.
Also tagged as: Members, States, War, Present, Vested, Number, Peace
Mr. Elseworth. With many this appears a natural consequence of his being elected by the Legislature. It was not the case with him. The Executive he thought should be reelected if his conduct proved him worthy of it. And he will be more likely to render himself worthy of it if he be rewardable with it. The most eminent characters also will be more willing to accept the trust under this condition, than if they foresee a necessary degradation at a fixt period. Mr. Gerry. That the Executive shd.
Also tagged as: Impeachment, Length of Term, National Executive, National Legislature, Second Term, Separation of Powers, Term Limits, Term of Office
Mr. Elseworth. With many this appears a natural consequence of his being elected by the Legislature. It was not the case with him. The Executive he thought should be reelected if his conduct proved him worthy of it. And he will be more likely to render him〈self〉 worthy of it if he be rewardable with it. The most eminent characters also will be more willing to accept the trust under this condition, than if they foresee a necessary degradation at a fixt period. Mr. Gerry. That the Executive shd
Also tagged as: Necessary, Given, Elected, Executive, Appointment, Consequence, Trust, Period, Years, Case, Legislature
Mr. Gerry. We seem to be entirely at a loss on this head. He would suggest whether it would not be advisable to refer the clause relating to the Executive to the Committee of detail to be appointed. Perhaps they will be able to hit on something that may unite the various opinions which have been thrown out. Mr. Wilson. As the great difficulty seems to spring from the mode of election, he wd. suggest a mode which had not been mentioned. It was that the Executive be elected for 6 years by a sma
Also tagged as: Powers, Executive, Public, Give, Provided, Years, Different, Office, Objections, Made, Use, Constitution, Appointment, Number, Impeachment, Legislature, Make, Elected, War, President, Bill, Time, Trust, Appointed, Period, Appoint, Equal, First
Mr. Gerry. We seem to be entirely at a loss on this head. He would suggest whether it would not be advisable to refer the clause relating to the Executive to the Committee of detail to be appointed. Perhaps they will be able to hit on something that may unite the various opinions which have been thrown out. Mr. Wilson. As the great difficulty seems to spring from the mode of election, he wd. suggest a mode which had not been mentioned. It was that the Executive be elected for 6 years by a sma
Mr. Pinkney thought this would have all the advantage & at the same time avoid in some degree the inconveniency, of an absolute ineligibility a 2d. time. Col. Mason approved the idea. It had the sanction of experience in the instance of Congs. and some of the Executives of the States. It rendered the Executive as effectually independent, as an ineligibility after his first election, and opened the way at the same time for the advantage of his future services. He preferred on the whole the ele
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Eligibility for Office, Equal Representation, Impeachment, Legislative Appointment, National Executive, National Legislature, Second Term, Separation of Powers, State Executive, Suffrage, Term Limits
Mr. Pinkney moved that the election by the Legislature be qualified with a proviso that no person be eligible for more than 6 years in any twelve years. He thought this would have all the advantage & at the same time avoid in some degree the inconveniency, of an absolute ineligibility a 2d. time. Col. Mason approved the idea. It had the sanction of experience in the instance of Congs. and some of the Executives of the States. It rendered the Executive as effectually independent, as an ineligi
Also tagged as: Legislature, States, Case, State, Executive, Second, First, Vote, Objections, Years, Made, Office, Time, Power, Lay, Citizens, Chosen, Foreign, Period, Legislatures, electors, Place, Services, Votes, House, Give, Take, Make, Union, Least, Elected, Different, Appointed, Given, Act
Delegates to Take Copies of Resolutions
Also tagged as: Necessary, Take, Members, Public, Proceedings, Case, Majority, House, Adjournment, Given, Amendments, Different
Mr. Gerry thought the inconveniency of excluding a few worthy individuals who might be public debtors or have unsettled accts ought not to be put in the Scale agst the public advantages of the regulation, and that the motion did not go far enough. Mr. King observed that there might be great danger in requiring landed property as a qualification since it would exclude the monied interest, whose aids may be essential in particular emergencies to the public safety. Mr. Dickenson. was agst. an
Also tagged as: Debt, National Legislature
Mr. Gerry thought the inconveniency of excluding a few worthy individuals who might be public debtors or have unsettled accts ought not to be put in the Scale agst the public [123] advantages of the regulation, and that the motion did not go far enough. Mr. King observed that there might be great danger in requiring landed property as a qualification since it would exclude the monied interest, whose aids may be essential in particular emergencies to the public safety.8 Mr. Dickenson. was a
Also tagged as: Public, Legislature, Constitution, Regulation, Title, Lay, Make, Government, Trust, Particular
Mr. Madison moved to strike out the word "landed", before the word, “qualifications”. If the proposition sd. be agreed to he wished the Committee to be at liberty to report the best criterion they could devise. Landed possessions were no certain evidence of real wealth. Many enjoyed them to a great extent who were more in debt than they were worth. The unjust laws of the States had proceeded more from this class of men, than any others. It had often happened that men who had acquired landed prop
Also tagged as: Debt, Electors, Land owning, National Legislature
Mr. 〈Madison〉 moved to strike out the word landed, before the word, “qualifications”. If the proposition sd. be agreed to he wished the Committee to be at liberty to report the best criterion they could devise. Landed possessions were no certain evidence of real wealth. Many enjoyed them to a great extent who were more in debt than they were worth. The unjust laws of the States had proceeded more from this class of men, than any others. It had often happened that men who had acquired landed prop
Also tagged as: Class, Citizens, Different, Public, Proper, Land, Representatives, States, Uniform, Elected, Legislatures, Case, Made, electors, First, Laws, Credit, Place
It was moved and seconded to adjourn till Wednesday morning which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 3; noes — 5.] Editors note: New Jersey, Delaware and Georgia are again absent, meaning the number of voting delegations has dropped to eight.
It was moved and seconded to adjourn till wednesday morning which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 3; noes — 5.] Editors' note: The delegations from Delaware, Georgia and New Jersey did not have enough members on the floor to be able to vote in this session.
Also tagged as: Adjourn, New, Members, Vote
To refer the report to a Committee of the whole Ayes — 5; noes — 4. Editors Note: The Delaware delegation is present again, moving the number of voting delegations to nine.
Delaware being represented during the Debate a question was again taken on ye Committee of ye whole Ayes — 3; noes — 6.
Delaware being represented during the Debate a question was again taken on ye Committee of ye whole Ayes — 3; noes — 6.
Also tagged as: Whole, question
Mr. Williamson was opposed to it. Mr. Wilson. This part of the Report was well considered by the Committee, and he did not think it could be changed for the better. It was difficult to form any uniform rule of qualifications for all the States. Unnecessary innovations he thought too should be avoided. It would be very hard & disagreeable for the same persons, at the same time, to vote for representatives in the State Legislature and to be excluded from a vote for those in the Natl. Legislatur
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, British Model, Holland, Liberty, National Legislature, Parliament, Qualifications for Office, State Government, State Legislature, Suffrage, Taxation
Mr. Williamson was opposed to it. Mr. Wilson. This part of the Report was well considered by the Committee, and he did not think it could be changed for the better. It was difficult to form any uniform rule of qualifications for all the States. Unnecessary innovations he thought too should be avoided. It would be very hard & disagreeable for the same persons, at the same time, to vote for representatives in the State Legislature and to be excluded from a vote for those in the Natl. Legislatur
Also tagged as: States, Proper, Think, Public, electors, Representatives, Present, Give, Different, Power, Fill, Vote, Subject, Representative, Case, Objections, Made, Become, Constitution, Thing, Judges, Legislature, Citizens, Make, Money, War, Elected, Time, State, Chosen, Votes, Equal, Persons, Several
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article IV: Section 6
Also tagged as: Age, Citizenship, Congress, Delaware, Electors, First Branch of National Legislature, Georgia, House of Representatives, Impeachment, Massachusetts, Mode of Election, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Preamble, Proportional Representation, Representation, Representatives, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Supreme Executive, Supreme Judiciary, Supreme Legislative, Taxation, The People, The States, Union, Virginia, We the People, Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, United States
On the question to agree to the 6 section of the 4. article as reported. it passed in the affirmative Editors' note: For the early part of this session, the delegation from Delaware was not quorate.
Also tagged as: question
It was moved and seconded to strike out the 3rd clause of the 1st section of the 5. article which passed in the affirmative [sic] [Ayes — 1; noes — 8; divided — 1.] Editors' note: As Farrand remarks in a footnote, the Journal is clearly mistaken here: Madison confirms that the motion was rejected. The number of voting delegations has here dropped to ten, as Delaware is absent according to the Detail of Ayes and Noes.
On the motion to agree to the three first clauses of the 1st section of the 5th article it passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 8; noes — 2; divided — 1.] Editors' note: Madison has "N. H ay. Mas. no. Ct. ay. N. J. ay. Pa. no- Del. ay. Md. ay. Virga ay N. C. no. S. C. divd. Geo. ay. [Ayes — 7; noes — 3; divided — 1.]" Pennsylvania's vote, recorded as "ay" in the Detail of Ayes and Noes, must therefore be recorded as uncertain: Farrand does not offer any speculation as to which record is corre
Mr. Elseworth. was opposed to the motion as discouraging meritorious aliens from emigrating to this Country. Mr. Pinkney. As the Senate is to have the power of making treaties & managing our foreign affairs, there is peculiar danger and impropriety in opening its door to those who have foreign attachments. He quoted the jealousy of the Athenians on this subject who made it death for any stranger to intrude his voice into their legislative proceedings. Col. Mason highly approved of the poli
Mr. Elseworth. was opposed to the motion as discouraging meritorious aliens from emigrating to this Country. Mr. Pinkney. As the Senate is to have the power of making treaties & managing our foreign affairs, there is peculiar danger and impropriety in opening its door to those who have foreign attachments. He quoted the jealousy of the Athenians on this subject who made it death for any stranger to intrude his voice into their legislative proceedings. Col. Mason highly approved of the poli
Also tagged as: Houses, Powers, Regulation, Public, Least, Proceedings, Give, Years, Holding, Laid, Different, Power, Removal, Subject, Choose, Case, Made, Use, Constitution, Foreign, Thing, Appointment, Number, Senate, Citizens, Offices, Make, Congress, War, Whole, Time, Place, State, Class, Appointed, Trust, Legislatures, Equal, Persons, Appointments
It was moved and seconded to strike the following words out of the 2nd sect. of the 6. article, namely “with regard to property” which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 4; noes — 6.] Editors' note: Delaware's vote is not recorded in the Journal, but is recorded as "no" in Madison. Therefore it will be recorded here as uncertain.
It was moved and seconded to strike the following words out of the 2nd sect. of the 6. article, namely “with regard to property” which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 4; noes — 6.] Editors' note: According to the Journal, Delaware did not have enough delegates in the chamber to be considered quorate. However, Madison records Delaware as voting against. In this case, the editors assume that those delegates present indicated their vote against, but as they were below quorum, the Secretary
Also tagged as: According, Sect, State, Present, Case, Vote, Journal, New
It was moved and seconded to reconsider the 2nd sect. of the 4th article which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 5.] Editors' note: Delaware have returned, bringing the number of voting delegations back to eleven.
On the question to agree to the 2nd sect. of the 6. article as reported. it passed in the negative. [Ayes — 3; noes — 7.] Editors' note: Madison does not record a vote for Delaware here, while the Journal continues to record the delegation as below quorum.
Also tagged as: Vote, question, Sect, Journal
Reconsider Article IV: Section 2 (Qualification of Representatives)
Also tagged as: Sect
It was moved and seconded to reconsider the 2nd sect. of the 4th article which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 5.] Editors' note: At this point, the Delaware delegation was quorate again.
Also tagged as: Sect
Mr. King remarked that the section authorized the 2 Houses to adjourn to a new place. He thought this inconvenient. The mutability of place had dishonored the federal Govt. and would require as strong a cure as we could devise. He thought a law at least should be made necessary to a removal of the Seat of Govt. Mr Madison viewed the subject in the same light, and joined with Mr. King in a motion requiring a law. Mr. Governr. Morris proposed the additional alteration by inserting the words
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Executive, Executive Branch, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Seat of Government, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 8 - Proposal for a Law to Fix the Seat of Congress
Also tagged as: Adjournment, Bicameral Legislature, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Seat of Government
Article VI: Section 8 - Clause 1 (No Adjournment Over Three Days)
Also tagged as: Several, question
It was moved and seconded to alter the 8th sect. of the 6. article to read as follows, namely, “The Legislature shall at their first assembling determine on a place at which their future Sessions shall be held: neither House shall afterwards, during the Session of the House of Representatives, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor shall they adjourn to any other place than such as shall have been fixed by law” which passed in the negative. Editors' note
During the last few sessions, the record keeping by both Jackson and Madison became sporadic, so much so that the timeline is easily confused, and certain events appear in only one source. At this point, it is clear that the Convention started to consider Section 8; however, it later appears that the clauses were voted on individually. As there is no record of when the division of the question occurs, it seems likely that this was done from the start, and so the editors shall show the division a
Also tagged as: Several, question
King, Madison and Morris's Amendment to Fix Location of Congress
Also tagged as: Adjourn, House, Place, Days, Legislature, Consent, Determine, Congress, Law, Sect, Representatives
It was moved and seconded to alter the 8th sect. of the 6. article to read as follows, namely, “The Legislature shall at their first assembling determine on a place at which their future Sessions shall be held: neither House shall afterwards, during the Session of the House of Representatives, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor shall they adjourn to any other place than such as shall have been fixed by law” which passed in the negative Editors' no
Also tagged as: House, Place, Vote, Adjourn, Days, Consent, Law, Sect, Determine, Period, Legislature, Representatives
Article VI: Section 8 - Clause 3 (Senate Exemption)
Also tagged as: Several, question
During the last few sessions, the record keeping by both Jackson and Madison became sporadic, so much so that the timeline is easily confused and certain events appear in only one source. At this point, it is clear that the Convention started to consider Section 8; however, it later appears that the clauses were voted on individually. As there is no record of when the division of the question occurred, it seems likely that this was done from the start, and so the editors will show the division a
Also tagged as: question, Several
Mr. Mercer. It was necessary he said to prevent a disfranchisement of persons who had become Citizens under the faith & according to — the laws & Constitution from being on a level in all respects with natives. Mr. Rutlidge. It might as well be said that all qualifications are disfranchisemts. and that to require the age of 25 years was a disfranchisement. The policy of the precaution was as great with regard to foreigners now Citizens; as to those who are to be naturalized in future. Mr S
Also tagged as: Age, Citizenship, Debt, Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Legislative Branch, National Legislature, Qualifications for Office, Treaties, Wealth
Mr. Mercer 2ded. the motion. It was necessary he said to prevent a disfranchisement of persons who had become Citizens under the faith 〈& according to〉 — the laws & Constitution 〈from〉 being on a level in all respects with natives. Mr. Rutlidge. It might as well be said that all qualifications are disfranchisemts. and that to require the age of 25 years was a disfranchisement. The policy of the precaution was as great with regard to foreigners now Citizens; as to those who are to be naturaliz
Also tagged as: Citizens, States, Constitution, Years, Age, Different, Persons, New, Equal, Necessary, Bound, State, Given, Laws, Foreign, Class, Become, Case, According, First, Enter, Thing, Make, Made, Regulation, Debts, Law, Act, Require, Public, Proceedings, Members, Place, Appoint, Treaties, Provided
Mr. Randolph would not repeat his reasons, but barely remind the members from the smaller States of the compromise by which the larger States were entitled to this privilege. Col. Mason. This amendment removes all the objections urged agst. the section as it stood at first. By specifying purposes of revenue, it obviated the objection that the Section extended to all bills under which money might incidentally arise. By authorizing amendments in the Senate it got rid of the objections that the
Also tagged as: British Constitution, British Model, Commerce, Executive, General Government, House of Commons, House of Lords, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Money Bills, National Government, National Legislature, National Treasury, Negative, Parliament, Qualifications for Office, Representation, Republic, Republican, Revenue, Senate, Small State, Taxation, War
Mr. Randolph moved that the clause be altered so as to read — “Bills for raising money for the purpose of revenue 〈or for appropriating the same shall originate in the House of Representatives〉 and shall not be 〈so〉 amended or altered by the Senate as to increase or diminish the sum to be raised, or change the mode of levying it, or the object of its appropriation.” — He would not repeat his reasons, but barely remind the members from the smaller States of the compromise by which the larger Stat
Also tagged as: Houses, States, Proper, Executive, Representatives, Trial, Least, Present, Particular, Years, Law, Entitled, Majority, Different, Compensation, Regulations, Power, Consequence, Subject, House, Vested, Amendments, Case, Objections, Cases, Tax, Constitution, Foreign, Thing, Government, Senate, Necessary, Make, Revenue, Money, Bill, War, Elected, Bills, Time, question, Chosen, Votes, New, First
Mr. Pinkney argued that the making the members ineligible to offices was degrading to them, and the more improper as their election into the Legislature implied that they had the confidence of the people; that it was inconvenient, because the Senate might be supposed to contain the fittest men. He hoped to see that body become a School of Public Ministers, a nursery of Statesmen: that it was impolitic, because the Legislature would cease to be a magnet to the first talents and abilities. ...
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Compensation, Corruption, Electors, Eligibility for Office, Equal Representation, Executive, House of Lords, Legislative Appointment, Length of Term, Merit, Military, Money Bills, National Legislature, Power of War, Property, Proportional Representation, Qualifications for Office, Ratification, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, State Constitutions, State Executive, The People, Tyranny
Col. Mason ironically proposed to strike out the whole section, as a more effectual expedient for encouraging that exotic corruption which might not otherwise thrive so well in the American Soil — for compleating that Aristocracy which was probably in the contemplation of some among us. and for inviting into the Legislative service, those generous & benevolent characters who will do justice to each other’s merit, by carving out offices & rewards for it. In the present state of American morals &
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Powers, Executive, Proper, Ambassadors, Public, Think, Present, Give, Years, Members, Consequence, Subject, House, Office, Case, Become, Government, Senate, Citizens, Legislature, Offices, Necessary, Given, Justice, According, War, Whole, Ministers, Time, State, Act, Chosen, Appointed, Provide, Legislatures, Appoint, Persons
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 9 - Gerry for Ineligibility for One Year Afterwards in Each House
Also tagged as: Eligibility for Office, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate
Mr Govr. Morris. Exclude the officers of the army & navy, and you form a band having a different interest from & opposed to the civil power: you stimulate them to despise & reproach those “talking Lords who dare not face the foe”. Let this spirit be roused at the end of a war, before your troops shall have laid down their arms, and though the Civil authority be “entrenched in parchment to the teeth” they will cut their way to it. He was agst. rendering the members of the Legislature ineligible t
Also tagged as: States, Exercise, Proper, Public, electors, Present, Give, Years, Members, Service, Different, Determine, Member, Power, Vote, House, Office, Case, Objections, Services, Propose, Made, Respective, Constitution, Judgment, Judges, Take, Legislature, Citizens, Offices, Given, Make, Money, War, Elected, Bills, question, Time, State, Appointed, Legislatures, Appointments
M. Randolph had been & should continue uniformly opposed to the striking out of the clause; as opening a door for influence & corruption. No arguments had made any impression on him, but those which related to the case of war, and a co-existing incapacity of the fittest commanders to be employed. He admitted great weight in these, and would agree to the exception proposed by Mr. Govr. Morris.
Also tagged as: Corruption, Eligibility for Office, National Legislature
M. Randolph had been & should continue uniformly opposed to the striking out of the clause; as opening a door for influence & corruption. No arguments had made any impression on him, but those which related to the case of war, and a co-existing incapacity of the fittest commanders to be employed. He admitted great weight in these, and would agree to the exception proposed by Mr. Govr. Morris.
Also tagged as: Case, Made, War
Mr. Govr Morris. remarked that if the members were to be paid by the States it would throw an unequal burden on the distant States, which would be unjust as the Legislature was to be a national Assembly. He moved that the payment be out of the Natl. Treasury; leaving the quantum to the discretion of the Natl. Legislature. There could be no reason to fear that they would overpay themselves. Mr. Butler contended for payment by the States; particularly in the case of the Senate, who will be so l
Also tagged as: Compensation, Divided sovereignty, First Branch of National Legislature, General Government, House of Representatives, National Legislature, National Treasury, Seat of Government, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, State Government
Mr. Carrol had been much surprised at seeing this clause in the Report. The dependence of both houses on the State Legislatures is compleat; especially as the members of the former are eligible to State offices. The States can now say: if you do not comply with our wishes, we will starve you: if you do we will reward you. The new Govt. in this form was nothing more than a second edition of Congress in two volumes, instead of one, and perhaps with very few amendments — Mr Dickenson took it for
Also tagged as: State, States, Legislatures, Legislature, Members, Objections, Senate, Second, Offices, Authority, Years, Money, Whole, Provided, Houses, Present, Congress, New, Trust, Act, Amendments
Mr Ghorum. this would be unreasonable. The Senate will be detained longer from home, will be obliged to remove their families, and in time of war perhaps to sit constantly. Their allowance should certainly be higher. The members of the Senates in the States are allowed more, than those of the other house.
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Compensation, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Senate
Mr Ghorum. this would be unreasonable. The Senate will be detained longer from home, will be obliged to remove their families, and in time of war perhaps to sit constantly. Their allowance should certainly be higher. The members of the Senates in the States are allowed more, than those of the other house.
Also tagged as: Members, States, War, Time, House, Senate
Mr. Govr. Morris regretted that something like the proposed check could not be agreed to. He dwelt on the importance of public Credit, and the difficulty of supporting it without some strong barrier against the instability of legislative Assemblies. He suggested the idea of requiring three fourths of each house to repeal laws where the President should not concur. He had no great reliance on the revisionary power as the Executive was now to be constituted (elected by the Congress). The legislatu
Also tagged as: Credit, Executive, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Legislative Branch, National Judiciary, National Legislature, President, Veto, War
Mr. Govr. Morris regretted that something like the proposed check could not be agreed to. He dwelt on the importance of public Credit, and the difficulty of supporting it without some strong barrier against the instability of legislative Assemblies. He suggested the idea of requiring three fourths of each house to repeal laws where the President should not concur. He had no great reliance on the revisionary power as the Executive was now to be constituted (elected by the Congress). The legislatu
Also tagged as: Executive, Public, Legislature, Power, President, Laws, Law, Constitution, Elected, Term, War, Authority, Years, Judges, Party, Different, Time, Citizens, Direct, House, State, Congress, Government, Credit, Members, Consequence
Mr. Govr. Morris, suggested the expedient of an absolute negative in the Executive. He could not agree that the Judiciary which was part of the Executive, should be bound to say that a direct violation of the Constitution was law. A controul over the legislature might have its inconveniences. But view the danger on the other side. The most virtuous citizens will often as members of a legislative body concur in measures which afterwards in their private capacity they will be ashamed of. Encroachm
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1
Also tagged as: Commerce, Inferior Tribunals, Military, Militia, National Legislature, Necessary and Proper, Power of War, Taxation, Treaties, War, Immigration, National Mint, Naturalization, Piracy, Impost, Legislative Power
Mr. Govr Morris. If the United States had credit such bills would be unnecessary: if they had not unjust & useless. Mr. Madison, will it not be sufficient to prohibit the making them a tender? This will remove the temptation to emit them with unjust views. And promissory notes in that shape may in some emergencies be best. Mr. Govr. Morris. striking out the words will leave room still for notes of a responsible minister which will do all the good without the mischief. The Monied interest w
Also tagged as: Congress, Credit, Finance, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Paper Money
Mr. Madison, will it not be sufficient to prohibit the making them a tender? This will remove the temptation to emit them with unjust views. And promissory notes in that shape may in some emergencies be best. Mr. Govr. Morris. striking out the words will leave room still for notes of a responsible minister which will do all the good without the mischief. The Monied interest will oppose the plan of Government, if paper emissions be not prohibited. Mr. Ghorum was for striking out, without in
Also tagged as: Money, Power, Government, Credit, Legislature, Class, Necessary, Subject, War, Give, New, Whole, Citizens, Made, Case, Bills, States, Public, State, Present, Propose, Thing
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Day, Vote, Place, Journal
It was moved and seconded to insert the word “joint” before the word “ballot” in the 9 clause of the 1 sect. 7 article, which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 7; noes — 3.] Editors note: Delaware are the missing delegation, bringing the vote count to ten.
It was moved and seconded to insert the word “joint” before the word “ballot” in the 9 clause of the 1 sect. 7 article which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 7; noes — 3.] Editors' note: Delaware was either absent or not quorate during this vote.
Also tagged as: Sect, Vote
It was moved and seconded to strike out the 9 clause of the 1. sect. of the 7 article which passed in the negative [Ayes — 4; noes — 6.] Editors note: Delaware return for this vote, and New Jersey become the absent delegation according to the Detail of Ayes and Noes.
It was moved and seconded to strike out the 9 clause of the 1. sect. of the 7 article which passed in the negative [Ayes — 4; noes — 6.] Editors' note: Delaware was now quorate, but New Jersey was not.
Also tagged as: Sect, New
Article VII: Section 1 - Clause 11 (Prizes of War)
Also tagged as: Land, Make, Rules
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Eleventh Clause (Captures)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Appointment, National Legislature, Piracy, War
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Twelfth Clause (Piracies and Felonies)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Piracy, Power of War
“To subdue rebellion” Ayes — 2; noes — 4; divided — 1. Editors' note: Farrand is not certain that this vote belongs with this question, but in the absence of any other evidence, it will be used as the Journal suggests. The Detail of Ayes and Noes suggests the low vote count stems from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Delaware joining New Jersey as absent.
“To subdue rebellion” Ayes — 2; noes — 4; divided — 1. Editors' note: Several members of the Convention appear to have left between this vote and the previous one. In addition to the previously under-represented New Jersey and Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Delaware are also recorded as having lost quorum.
Also tagged as: Several, Vote, Members, New
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Fourteenth Clause (War)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War
Article VII: Section 1 - Clause 14 (War)
Also tagged as: Make, War
Mr Pinkney opposed the vesting this power in the Legislature. Its proceedings were too slow. It wd. meet but once a year. The Hs. of Reps. would be too numerous for such deliberations. The Senate would be the best depositary, being more acquainted with foreign affairs, and most capable of proper resolutions. If the States are equally represented in Senate, so as to give no advantage to large States, the power will notwithstanding be safe, as the small have their all at stake in such cases as wel
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive, Executive Power, First Branch of National Legislature, Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr Pinkney opposed the vesting this power in the Legislature. Its proceedings were too slow. It wd. meet but once a year. The Hs. of Reps. would be too numerous for such deliberations. The Senate would be the best depositary, being more acquainted with foreign affairs, and most capable of proper resolutions. If the States are equally represented in Senate, so as to give no advantage to large States, the power will notwithstanding be safe, as the small have their all at stake in such cases as wel
Also tagged as: States, Senate, Power, Legislature, War, Make, President, Proceedings, Peace, Authority, Objections, Give, Proper, Cases, Foreign
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Fourteenth Clause (War): Madison/Gerry for "Declare"
Madison's Amendment to Declare Rather than Make War
Also tagged as: Make, War, Power, Executive
Mr. Madison and Mr Gerry moved to insert “declare,” striking out “make” war; leaving to the Executive the power to repel sudden attacks. Mr Sharman thought it stood very well. The Executive shd. be able to repel and not to commence war. “Make” better than “declare” the latter narrowing the power too much. Mr Gerry never expected to hear in a republic a motion to empower the Executive alone to declare war. Mr. Elseworth. there is a material difference between the cases of making war, and
Also tagged as: Congress, Diplomacy, Executive, Executive Power, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr Sharman thought it stood very well. The Executive shd. be able to repel and not to commence war. “Make” better than “declare” the latter narrowing the power too much. Mr Gerry never expected to hear in a republic a motion to empower the Executive alone to declare war. Mr. Elseworth. there is a material difference between the cases of making war, and making peace. It shd. be more easy to get out of war, than into it. War also is a simple and overt declaration. peace attended with intrica
Also tagged as: War, Peace, Executive, Power, Make, Entitled, Senate, Cases
It was moved and seconded to strike out the word “make” and to insert the word “declare” in the 14th clause which passed in the negative [Ayes — 4; noes — 5.] Editors note: The number of voting delegations having returned to nine, with the return of Delaware and Pennsylvania, indicated that Massachusetts was still absent.
It was moved and seconded to strike out the word “make” and to insert the word “declare” in the 14th clause which passed in the negative [Ayes — 4; noes — 5.] Editors' note: The number of voting delegations returned to nine for this vote. Delaware and Pennsylvania had enough members in the chamber to be considered quorate again.
Also tagged as: Members, Vote, Make, Number
The question being again taken to strike out the word “make” and to insert the word “declare” in the 14. clause it passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 8; noes — 1.] Editors' note: Madison adds the following: "On the remark by Mr. King that 'make' war might be understood to 'conduct' it which was an Executive function, Mr. Elseworth gave up his objection 〈and the vote of Cont was changed to — ay.〉" The exact stage at which this occurs in the process is uncertain. Madison's Notes do not
Also tagged as: Make, War, Executive, question, Second, Vote, First
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Fourteenth Clause (War): Butler for "Make Peace"
Also tagged as: Congress, Diplomacy, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Peace, Power of War
Butler's Amendment for Power to Make Peace
Also tagged as: Make, States, Exercise, War, Senators, Whole, Power, Present, Give, Vested, Journal, Peace, Senate, Legislature
The Journal records that '"separate questions having been taken on the 9, 10, 11, 12, and 14 clauses of the 1st section, 7 article as amended. They passed in the affirmative." However, McHenry writes in his notes that the Convention "debated the difference between a power to declare war, and to make war — amended by substituting declare — adjourned without a question on the clause."
Also tagged as: War, Make, Power, question, Journal
Proposed Powers of the Legislature of the United States - Gerry on Securities and Letters of Marque
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Letter of Marque, National Legislature, Power of War, Privateering
Mr. Mason was much attached to the principle, but was afraid such a fetter might be dangerous in time of war. He suggested the necessity of preventing the danger of perpetual revenue which must of necessity subvert the liberty of any Country. If it be objected to on the principal of Mr. Rutlidge’s motion that Public Credit may require perpetual provisions, that case might be excepted; it being declared that in other cases, no taxes should be laid for a longer term than years. He considered the c
Gerry's Additional Powers Proposed for the Legislature of the United States
Also tagged as: Made, States, Regulation, Powers, United, Public, Power, War, Journal, Legislature
Mr. Mason was much attached to the principle, but was afraid such a fetter might be dangerous in time of war. He suggested the necessity of preventing the danger of perpetual revenue which must of necessity subvert the liberty of any Country. If it be objected to on the principal of Mr. Rutlidge’s motion that Public Credit may require perpetual provisions, that case might be excepted; it being declared that in other cases, no taxes should be laid for a longer term than years. He considered the c
Also tagged as: Cases, Revenue, Term, War, Credit, Public, Time, Years, Case, Laid, Require
Proposed rules and standing orders for the Convention - Rutledge's August/September Timetable
Rutledge's Motion for Extending Sessions of the Convention
Also tagged as: Adjourn, President, Time, House, Rules, Public, Members, Adjournment
Genl. Pinkney asked whether no troops were ever to be raised untill an attack should be made on us? Mr. Gerry. if there be no restriction, a few States may establish a military Govt. Mr. Williamson, reminded him of Mr. Mason’s motion for limiting the appropriation of revenue as the best guard in this case. Mr. Langdon saw no room for Mr. Gerry’s distrust of the Representatives of the people. Mr. Dayton. preparations for war are generally made in peace; and a standing force of some so
Mr. Elseworth observed that a Council had not yet been provided for the President. He conceived there ought to be one. His proposition was that it should be composed of the President of the Senate- the Chief-Justice, and the Ministers as they might be estabd. for the departments of foreign & domestic affairs, war finance, and marine, who should advise but not conclude the President. Mr Pinkney wished the proposition to lie over, as notice had been given for a like purpose by Mr. Govr. Morris
Also tagged as: President, Made, Executive, Provided, Foreign, Legislature, Subject, Lay, Ministers, Appointments, War, Justice, Duties, Give, Consent, House, Given, Thing, Proper, Case
Mr. Mason considered uniformity as necessary in the regulation of the Militia throughout the Union. Genl Pinkney mentioned a case during the war in which a dissimilarity in the militia of different States had produced the most serious mischiefs. Uniformity was essential. The States would never keep up a proper discipline of their militia. Mr. Elseworth was for going as far in submitting the militia to the Genl Government as might be necessary, but thought the motion of Mr. Mason went too f
Mr Madison thought the regulation of the Militia naturally appertaining to the authority charged with the public defence. It did not seem in its nature to be divisible between two distinct authorities. If the States would trust the Genl. Govt. with a power over the public treasure, they would from the same consideration of necessity grant it the direction of the public force. Those who had a full view of the public situation wd. from a sense of the danger, guard agst. it: the States would not be
Genl. Pinkney asked whether no troops were ever to be raised untill an attack should be made on us? Mr. Gerry. if there be no restriction, a few States may establish a military Govt. Mr. Williamson, reminded him of Mr. Mason’s motion for limiting the appropriation of revenue as the best guard in this case. Mr. Langdon saw no room for Mr. Gerry’s distrust of the Representatives of the people. Mr. Dayton. preparations for war are generally made in peace; and a standing force of some so
Also tagged as: Made, States, Become, Peace, War, Case, Establish, Revenue, Representatives
Genl Pinkney mentioned a case during the war in which a dissimilarity in the militia of different States had produced the most serious mischiefs. Uniformity was essential. The States would never keep up a proper discipline of their militia.
Also tagged as: States, Case, War, Proper, Different, Militia
Mr Madison thought the regulation of the Militia naturally appertaining to the authority charged with the public defence. It did not seem in its nature to be divisible between two distinct authorities. If the States would trust the Genl. Govt. with a power over the public treasure, they would from the same consideration of necessity grant it the direction of the public force. Those who had a full view of the public situation wd. from a sense of the danger, guard agst. it: the States would not be
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Public, Power, Laws, Regulation, Authority, United, Money, Give, Places, Grant, Consequence, New, Trust
Mr. M〈adison,〉 thought the definition too narrow. It did not appear to go as far as the Stat. of Edwd. III. He did not see why more latitude might not be left to the Legislature. It wd. be as safe as in the hands of State legislatures; and it was inconvenient to bar a discretion which experience might enlighten, and which might be applied to good purposes as well as be abused. Mr Mason was for pursuing the Stat: of Edwd. III. Mr. Govr Morris was for giving to the Union an exclusive right t
Also tagged as: Treason, States, Case, State, Act, Union, Legislature, War, Authority, Offences, Necessary, Different, Power, Legislatures, Constitute, Acts, Particular, Punish
Morris's Amendment to Define Treason based on British Law
Also tagged as: Treason, States, War, United, Sect, question, Take, Law, Crime, Constitute
It was moved and seconded to postpone the consideration of the 2nd sect. 7 article in order to take up the following. “Whereas it is essential to the preservation of Liberty to define precisely and exclusively what shall constitute the crime of Treason it is therefore ordained declared and established that if a man do levy war against the United States within their Territories or be adherent to the enemies of the United States within the said territories giving to them aid and comfort within
Also tagged as: States, United, Treason, Crime, New, question, War, Take, Sect, Vote, Constitute
Mr. Wilson. the clause is ambiguous now. “Sole” ought either to have been inserted — or “against the U- S.” to be reinstated. Mr King no line can be drawn between levying war and adhering to enemy — agst the U. States and agst an individual States — Treason agst the latter must be so agst the former. Mr Sherman, resistance agst. the laws of the U- States as distinguished from resistance agst the laws of a particular State, forms the line- Mr. Elseworth- the U. S. are sovereign on one si
Also tagged as: Treason, Made, Respective, States, Member, Constitution, War, Whole, Power, State, Particular, Union, Laws
Madison's Amendment Reworking the First Line
Also tagged as: Treason, Sect, States, War, Consist, United
It was moved and seconded to amend the 1st clause of the 2 sect. 7 article to read “Treason against the United States shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies” which passed in the affirmative Editors' note: Although the voting is not recorded, it seems likely that this was once again a unanimous decision.
Also tagged as: Treason, Sect, States, War, Consist, United
Mr. Madison, thought the definition too narrow. It did not appear to go as far as the Stat. of Edwd. III. He did not see why more latitude might not be left to the Legislature. It wd. be as safe as in the hands of State legislatures; and it was inconvenient to bar a discretion which experience might enlighten, and which might be applied to good purposes as well as be abused. Mr Mason was for pursuing the Stat: of Edwd. III. Mr. Govr Morris was for giving to the Union an exclusive right to
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 2 - "Overt Act"
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 2 - Morris/Randolph to Substitute Statute Language
Mr. Wilson. the clause is ambiguous now. “Sole” ought either to have been inserted — or “against the U- S.” to be reinstated. Mr King no line can be drawn between levying war and adhering to enemy — agst the U. States and agst an individual States — Treason agst the latter must be so agst the former. Mr Sherman, resistance agst. the laws of the U- States as distinguished from resistance agst the laws of a particular State, forms the line- Mr. Elseworth- the U. S. are sovereign on one si
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 2 - First Clause Amendment
It was moved and seconded to amend the 1st clause of the 2 sect. 7 article to read “Treason against the United States shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies” which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: No vote count is provided.
Mr Sherman withdrew his motion to make way for one of Mr Williamson to add to sect- 3. “By this rule the 〈several〉 quotas of the States 〈shall be determined in〉 Settling the expences of the late war”
Also tagged as: War, Make, States
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 3 - Williamson on Settling Expenses of War
Also tagged as: Debt, Legislative Power, Taxation, War
Williamson's Amendment on State Debts
Also tagged as: States, Debts, State, Several, War
Mr. Carrol brought into view the difficulty that might arise on this subject from the establishment of the Constitution as intended without the Unanimous consent of the States.
Also tagged as: Debt, Taxation, War
Mr. Madison. The last appointment of Congs., on which the number of Representatives was founded, was conjectural and meant only as a temporary rule till a Census should be established. Mr. Read. The requisitions of Congs. had been accommodated to the impoverishments produced by the war; and to other local and temporary circumstances — Mr. Williamson opposed Mr Gerry’s motion Mr Langdon was not here when N. H. was allowed three members. If it was more than her share; he did not wish for
Also tagged as: Census, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Taxation
Mr. M〈adison.〉 The last appointment of Congs., on which the number of Representatives was founded, was conjectural and meant only as a temporary rule till a Census should be established. Mr. Read. The requisitions of Congs. had been accommodated to the impoverishments produced by the war; and to other local and temporary circumstances — Mr. Williamson opposed Mr Gerry’s motion Mr Langdon was not here when N. H. was allowed three members. If it was more than her share; he did not wish fo
Also tagged as: Members, Appointment, Number, War, Representatives
Mr. Langdon. by this section the States are left at liberty to tax exports. N. H. therefore with other non-exporting States, will be subject to be taxed by the States exporting its produce. This could not be admitted. It seems to be feared that the Northern States will oppress the trade of the Southn. This may be guarded agst by requiring the concurrence of ⅔ or ¾ of the legislature in such cases. Mr Elseworth— It is best as it stands— The power of regulating trade between the States will pro
Also tagged as: States, Regulation, Proper, Powers, Equal, Present, Particular, Duties, Give, Laid, Duty, Different, Majority, Exports, Power, Subject, Case, Enumeration, Cases, Made, Tax, Lay, Treaties, Take, Legislature, Citizens, Given, Necessary, Congress, Revenue, War, Direct, Time, State, Votes, Nations, Imports
Mr. Langdon. by this section the States are left at liberty to tax exports. N. H. therefore with other non-exporting States, will be subject to be taxed by the States exporting its produce. This could not be admitted. It seems to be feared that the Northern States will oppress the trade of the Southn. This may be guarded agst by requiring the concurrence of two-thirds or three-fourths of the legislature in such cases. Mr Elseworth— It is best as it stands— The power of regulating trade betwee
Also tagged as: Exports, Immigration, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, New Jersey, North Carolina, Northern States, Pennsylvania, Power of War, Revenue, Southern States, Taxation, Trade, War Powers
Art. VII sect 4. resumed. Mr. Sherman was for leaving the clause as it stands. He disapproved of the slave trade: yet as the States were now possessed of the right to import slaves, as the public good did not require it to be taken from them, & as it was expedient to have as few objections as possible to the proposed scheme of Government, he thought it best to leave the matter as we find it. He observed that the abolition of slavery seemed to be going on in the U. S. & that the good sense of the
Also tagged as: Congress, Cromwell, General Government, Greece, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Northern States, Quakers, Rome, Slavery, Southern States, State power, Taxation, Trade, Union, Western States
Art. VII sect 4. resumed. Mr. Sherman was for leaving the clause as it stands. He disapproved of the slave trade: yet as the States were now possessed of the right to import slaves, as the public good did not require it to be taken from them, & as it was expedient to have as few objections as possible to the proposed scheme of Government, he thought it best to leave the matter as we find it. He observed that the abolition of slavery seemed to be going on in the U. S. & that the good sense of the
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Public, Present, Give, Law, Duty, Power, Fill, Subject, Case, Objections, Made, Use, Become, Constitution, Foreign, Sect, Thing, Government, Stated, Take, Require, Treasury, Given, Necessary, War, Whole, Time, question, State, Class, Union, Equal, Imports
Mr. Sherman considered this as absolutely inadmissible. He said that if the people should be so far asleep as to allow the Most influential officers of the Militia to be appointed by the Genl. Government, every man of discernment would rouse them by sounding the alarm to them — Mr. Gerry. Let us at once destroy the State Govts have an Executive for life or hereditary, and a proper Senate, and then there would be some consistency in giving full powers to the Genl Govt. but as the States are no
Also tagged as: Congress, Constitutional Convention, General Government, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, State Government, States' Rights
Mr. Sherman considered this as absolutely inadmissible. He said that if the people should be so far asleep as to allow the Most influential officers of the Militia to be appointed by the Genl. Government, every man of discernment would rouse them by sounding the alarm to them — Mr. Gerry. Let us at once destroy the State Govts have an Executive for life or hereditary, and a proper Senate, and then there would be some consistency in giving full powers to the Genl Govt. but as the States are no
Also tagged as: Made, Necessary, States, Powers, Executive, Proper, War, Government, Officers, State, Militia, Appointed, Give, Equal, Senate
Mr Madison suggested the inconvenience of requiring a legal ratification of treaties of alliance for the purposes of war &c &c Mr. Ghorum. Many other disadvantages must be experienced if treaties of peace and all negociations are to be previously ratified — and if not prevously, the Ministers would be at a loss how to proceed— What would be the case in G. Britain if the King were to proceed in this maner? American Ministers must go abroad not instructed by the same Authority (as will be the c
Also tagged as: Corruption, Diplomacy, Foreign Affairs, Legislative Power, Parliament, Peace, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Small State, Treaties, War
Mr Madison suggested the inconvenience of requiring a legal ratification of treaties of alliance for the purposes of war &c &c Mr. Ghorum. Many other disadvantages must be experienced if treaties of peace and all negociations are to be previously ratified — and if not prevously, the Ministers would be at a loss how to proceed— What would be the case in G. Britain if the King were to proceed in this maner? American Ministers must go abroad not instructed by the same Authority (as will be the c
Also tagged as: Treaties, Ministers, Powers, Made, Foreign, Legislature, Necessary, War, Case, Thing, Government, Senate, Exports, Proceedings, Ambassadors, States, Equal, Authority, Lay, Whole, Provide, Make, Proper, Peace, Duties, Particular, Acts, Vested, Power
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 2 - Sherman on Appointment of Officers By Law
Sherman's Amendment to Limit Presidential Appointments
Also tagged as: Cases, Herein, Lay, Constitution, Proper, Executive, War, Officers, Government, Time, Appointed, Provided, Law, Appoint, Peace, Appointments
It was moved and seconded to amend the first clause of the report to read The importation of Slaves into such of the States as shall permit the same shall not be prohibited by the Legislature of the U. S. until the year 1808. which passed in the negative. Editors' note: Madison's Notes, by contrast, record that the motion "was agreed to nem: cont: 〈In the printed Journal. Cont. Virga. & Georgia voted in the affirmative.〉" It seems most likely form this that Madison simply wrote 'agre
Also tagged as: Legislature, Vote, States, question, Journal
On the question N— H— no. Mas. no. Ct. ay— Pa no Md. no. Va. no. N. C. no. S. C. no. Geo. no. [Ayes — 1; noes — 8.] Editors' note: In the Detail of Ayes and Noes, the Journal includes Delaware in the negative, about which Farrand writes 'Probably the same as Vote 372, Detail of Ayes and Noes, which includes Delaware in the negative.' Therefore it will be followed as the more accurate source.
[—————Ayes — 1; noes — 9.] Editors' note: In the Detail of Ayes and Noes, the Journal includes this vote without naming the motion it pertains to. Farrand suggests this is the vote Madison records on Sherman's amendment as "N— H— no. Mas. no. Ct. ay— Pa no Md. no. Va. no. N. C. no. S. C. no. Geo. no.", though Madison had forgotten to include Delaware. The Journal's vote count is therefore used.
Also tagged as: Vote, Journal
Wilson's Amendment to Prohibit Bills of Credit and Paper Money
Also tagged as: Legislature, Bills, Credit, States, Debts, War, State, United, Consent, Coin, Thing, Money, Make, Time, Duties, Imports, Peace, Enter, Foreign, Lay, Imposts, Power
Mr. Sherman thought the States ought to retain this power in order to prevent suffering & injury to their poor. Col: Mason thought the amendment would be not only improper but dangerous, as the Genl. Legislature would not sit constantly and therefore could not interpose at the necessary moments— He enforced his objection by appealing to the necessity of sudden embargoes during the war, to prevent exports, particularly in the case of a blockade— Mr Govr. Morris considered the provision as u
Also tagged as: Necessary, States, War, Exports, Power, State, Vested, Case, Legislature
Article XIII: Clause 4 (State Conduct of War)
Also tagged as: Several
Mr. Madison...urged that such acts by the States would be unnecessary — impolitic — & unjust— Mr. Sherman thought the States ought to retain this power in order to prevent suffering & injury to their poor. Col: Mason thought the amendment would be not only improper but dangerous, as the Genl. Legislature would not sit constantly and therefore could not interpose at the necessary moments— He enforced his objection by appealing to the necessity of sudden embargoes during the war, to prevent
Williamson's Amendment on Validity of State Laws and Courts
Also tagged as: State, Laws, Courts, Union, States, Subject, Congress, Place
Morris's Proposition for the Committee on Interstate Comity and Bankruptcy
Also tagged as: Proceedings, State, Acts, Public, Laws, Given, Legislature, States, Determine, Judicial
Mr. Pinkney...remarked that there were five distinct commercial interests— 1. the fisheries & W. India trade, which belonged to the N. England States. 2. the interest of N. York lay in a free trade. 3. Wheat & flour the Staples of the two Middle States, (N. J. & Penna.)— 4 Tobo. the staple of Maryd. & Virginia & partly of N. Carolina. 5. Rice & Indigo, the staples of S. Carolina & Georgia. These different interests would be a source of oppressive regulations if no check to a bare majority should
Genl. Pinkney said it was the true interest of the S. States to have no regulation of commerce; but considering the loss brought on the commerce of the Eastern States by the revolution, their liberal conduct towards the views* of South Carolina, and the interest the weak Southn. States had in being united with the strong Eastern States, he thought it proper that no fetters should be imposed on the power of making commercial regulations; and that his constituents though prejudiced against the Eas
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Think, Public, Present, Particular, Give, Majority, Different, United, Regulations, Power, Bound, Navy, Removal, Subject, Vote, House, Case, Objections, Enumeration, Made, Cases, Use, Foreign, Constitution, Take, Stated, Require, Necessary, Congress, Acts, Place, Act, Union, Votes, Nations
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XVII: Carroll to Strike Out Consent of State to Division
Carroll's Amendment for States to be Divided without their Consent
Also tagged as: Consent, States, Provided, Subject, question, State
Mr Carrol moved to add — “Provided nevertheless that nothing in this Constitution shall be construed to affect the claim of the U. S. to vacant lands ceded to them by the Treaty of peace”. This he said might be understood as relating to lands not claimed by any particular States. but he had in view also some of the claims of particular States. Mr. Wilson was agst. the motion. There was nothing in the Constitution affecting one way or the other the claims of the U. S. & it was best to insert n
Mr. Wilson was agst. the motion. There was nothing in the Constitution affecting one way or the other the claims of the U. S. & it was best to insert nothing, leaving every thing on that litigated subject in statu quo. Mr. Madison considered the claim of the U. S. as in fact favored by the jurisdiction of the Judicial power of the U— S— over controversies to which they should be parties. He thought it best on the whole to be silent on the subject. He did not view the proviso of Mr. Carrol as
Also tagged as: States, Subject, Particular, Affecting, War, Peace, Jurisdiction, Judicial, Constitution, Thing, Given, Whole, Make, Proper, Power
On the question to agree to the 20 article as amended it passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 8; noes — 1; divided — 2.] Editors' note: The Journal places this vote before the vote on Pickney's amendment, however, this seems to be a error, as Madison places the vote afterwards.
Also tagged as: Places, Vote, question, Journal
On the question N. H. ay. Mas. ay. Ct. ay. N— J— ay. Pa. ay. Md. no. Virga. ay. N. C. ay. 〈S. C. ay.〉 Geo. ay. [Ayes — 9; noes — 1.] Editors' note: Delaware were not quorate for this vote only.
Also tagged as: Vote, question
Mr. Carrol mentioned the mode of altering the Constitution of Maryland pointed out therein, and that no other mode could be pursued in that State. Mr. King thought that striking out “Conventions”. as the requisite mode was equivalent to giving up the business altogether. Conventions alone, which will avoid all the obstacles from the complicated formation of the Legislatures, will succeed, and if not positively required by the plan, its enemies will oppose that mode. Mr. Govr. Morris said h
Mr. Carrol mentioned the mode of altering the Constitution of Maryland pointed out therein, and that no other mode could be pursued in that State. Mr. King thought that striking out “Conventions”. as the requisite mode was equivalent to giving up the business altogether. Conventions alone, which will avoid all the obstacles from the complicated formation of the Legislatures, will succeed, and if not positively required by the plan, its enemies will oppose that mode. Mr. Govr. Morris said h
Also tagged as: Made, Given, States, Constitution, Powers, Officers, Several, Bills, Power, Least, question, State, Require, Legislatures, Prescribed, Legislature, First
Article XXII (Ratification by Congress)
Also tagged as: Legislature, Chosen, Laid, Receive, Constitution
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXII
Morris's Amendment Calling for State Ratifying Conventions
Also tagged as: Respective, States, Congress, Constitution, United, State, Chosen, Provide, Legislatures, Receive, Laid, Several
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXII: Morris and Pinckney's Amendment
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendment to the 22nd article “This Constitution shall be laid before the United States in Congress assembled — and it is the opinion of this Convention that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention chosen in each State in order to receive the ratification of such Convention: to which end the several Legislatures ought to provide for the calling Conventions within their respective States as speedily as circumstances will permit.”
Also tagged as: States, Congress, Legislatures, Respective, United, State, Chosen, Several, Laid, Constitution, Provide, Receive
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendment to the 22nd article “This Constitution shall be laid before the United States in Congress assembled — and it is the opinion of this Convention that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention chosen in each State in order to receive the ratification of such Convention: to which end the several Legislatures ought to provide for the calling Conventions within their respective States as speedily as circumstances will permit.”
Mr. Madison thought the restriction wd. be inconvenient, as in the River Delaware, if a vessel cannot be required to make entry below the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania. Mr. Fitzimmons admitted that it might be inconvenient, but thought it would be a greater inconveniency to require vessels bound to Philada. to enter below the jurisdiction of the State. Mr. Gorham & Mr. Langdon, contended that the Govt would be so fettered by this clause, as to defeat the good purpose of the plan. They menti
Mr. Madison thought the restriction wd. be inconvenient, as in the River Delaware, if a vessel cannot be required to make entry below the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania. Mr. Fitzimmons admitted that it might be inconvenient, but thought it would be a greater inconveniency to require vessels bound to Philada. to enter below the jurisdiction of the State. Mr. Gorham & Mr. Langdon, contended that the Govt would be so fettered by this clause, as to defeat the good purpose of the plan. They menti
Also tagged as: Jurisdiction, State, Case, Enter, Government, House, Take, Require, Make, Officer
It was moved and seconded to strike out the words “judgments obtained in one State shall have in another” and to insert the word “thereof” after the word “effect” in the report from the Committee of five entered on the Journal of the 1st instant which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 3.] Editors' note: Both New Hampshire and Delaware are recorded as absent for this vote in the Detail of Ayes and Noes, bringing the number of voting delegations to nine.
It was moved and seconded to strike out the words “judgments obtained in one State shall have in another” and to insert the word “thereof” after the word “effect” in the report from the Committee of five entered on the Journal of the 1st instant which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 3.] Editors' note: The delegations from Delaware and New Hampshire were both absent or not quorate at this point in the session.
Also tagged as: Entered, New, Journal, State
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Time, Proceedings, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
To adjourn Ayes — 2; noes — 8. Editors' note: This motion may well have been out of order, though it was clearly allowed. On 18 August Rutledge's motion to regulate the meeting times and adjournments of the Convention had been passed, setting a new rule for the Convention's proceedings. This barred any motion for adjournment, leaving it to the president to make the decision at 4pm. However, on 24 August this rule was amended, when the Journal records that the time for adjournment was brought
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Place, Time, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Time, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
To adjourn Ayes — 4; noes — 6. Editors' note: This motion may well have been out of order, though it was clearly allowed. On 18 August Rutledge's motion to regulate the meeting times and adjournments of the Convention had been passed, setting a new rule for the Convention's proceedings. This barred any motion for adjournment, leaving it to the president to make the decision at 4pm. However, on 24 August this rule was amended, when the Journal records that the time for adjournment was brought
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Time, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions
The honorable Mr Brearley from the Committee of eleven informed the House that the Committee were prepared to report partially — He then read the report in his place; it was afterwards delivered in at the Secretary’s table — and was again read: and is as follows. Editors' note: The Report was read on 4 September 1787.
Also tagged as: House, Place
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters
Also tagged as: Second, House, Place
The (1st.) clause of the Report was agreed to nem. con. Editors' note: Delaware had returned to quorum, after being unable to vote in the previous session.
Also tagged as: Vote
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Adjournment, Time, President, Meeting, Vote, Proceedings, Times, New, Place, Journal, Make
To adjourn Ayes — 11; noes — 0. Editors' note: Is is likely that this main was proposed before the usual time of adjournment called by the President. This motion may well have been out of order, though it was clearly allowed. On 18 August Rutledge's motion to regulate the meeting times and adjournments of the Convention had been passed, setting a new rule for the Convention's proceedings. This barred any motion for adjournment, leaving it to the president to make the decision at 4pm. However,
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Time, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
Third Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: First Clause
Mr Gerry suggested that the eventual election should be made by six Senators and seven Representatives chosen by joint ballot of both Houses. Mr King observed that the influence of the Small States in the Senate was somewhat balanced by the influence of the large States in bringing forward the candidates, and also by the Concurrence of the small States in the Committee in the clause vesting the exclusive origination of Money bills in the House of Representatives.
Mr Gerry suggested that the eventual election should be made by six Senators and seven Representatives chosen by joint ballot of both Houses. Mr King observed that the influence of the Small States in the Senate was somewhat balanced by the influence of the large States in bringing forward the candidates,* and also by the Concurrence of the small States in the Committee in the clause vesting the exclusive origination of Money bills in the House of Representatives. *This explains the compromise
Also tagged as: States, Representatives, Bills, Money, Members, Concurrence, Houses, Senators, Government, House, Chosen, Senate, Made, Constitution
Mr. Gerry proposed, as the President was to be elected by the Senate out of the five highest candidates, that if he should not at the end of his term be re-elected by a majority of the Electors, and no other candidate should have a majority, the eventual election should be made by the Legislature — This he said would relieve the President from his particular dependence on the Senate for his continuance in office. Mr. King liked the idea, as calculated to satisfy particular members & promote u
Mr. Gerry proposed, as the President was to be elected by the Senate out of the five highest candidates, that if he should not at the end of his term be re-elected by a majority of the Electors, and no other candidate should have a majority, the eventual election should be made by the Legislature — This he said would relieve the President from his particular dependence on the Senate for his continuance in office. Mr. King liked the idea, as calculated to satisfy particular members & promote u
Also tagged as: Senate, President, Make, Power, Appointment, States, Powers, Appoint, Executive, Treaties, Offices, Office, Different, Votes, Take, Appointments, Legislature, Years, electors, Act, Number, Case, Whole, New, Made, Officers, Majority, Elected, Use, Give, Exercise, Present, Amendments, Judges, Judicial, Government, Vote, Particular, House, Members, Officer, First, Objections, Appointed, Persons, Land, Holding, Promote, Constitution, Foreign
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Madison on Peace Treaties
Mr Gorham thought the precaution unnecessary as the means of carrying on the war would not be in the hands of the President, but of the Legislature. Mr. Govr Morris thought the power of the President in this case harmless; and that no peace ought to be made without the concurrence of the President, who was the general Guardian of the National interests. Mr. Butler was strenuous for the motion, as a necessary security against ambitious & corrupt Presidents. He mentioned the late perfidious
Madison's Amendment for Two Thirds of the Senate to Make Peace Without the Consent of the President
Also tagged as: Make, War, President, Power, Treaties, State, Consent, Provide, Journal, Concurrence, Peace, Senate
Mr Gorham thought the precaution unnecessary as the means of carrying on the war would not be in the hands of the President, but of the Legislature. Mr. Govr Morris thought the power of the President in this case harmless; and that no peace ought to be made without the concurrence of the President, who was the general Guardian of the National interests. Mr. Butler was strenuous for the motion, as a necessary security against ambitious & corrupt Presidents. He mentioned the late perfidious
Also tagged as: Made, Necessary, War, President, Power, Least, Treaties, Concurrence, Votes, Case, Peace, Legislature
On the question, “authorizing the President to call for the opinions of the Heads of Departments, in writing:” it passed in the affirmative, N. H. only being no.* 〈The clause was then unanimously agreed to.〉 *〈Not so stated in the Printed Journal; but comformable to the result afterwards appearing. passed in the〉 Editors' note: The Journal recorded a final vote of the day, with the simple label "To agree to the last question", as being unanimous. Farrand was unable to satisfactorily piece
Also tagged as: Vote, Journal, question, President, Stated, Present, New, Day
Mr. Wilson wished the requisition of two thirds to be struck out altogether If the majority cannot be trusted, it was a proof, as observed by Mr. Ghorum, that we were not fit for one Society. A reconsideration of the whole clause was agreed to. Mr. Govr. Morris was agst. striking out the “exception of Treaties of peace” If two thirds of the Senate should be required for peace, the Legislature will be unwilling to make war for that reason, on account of the Fisheries or the Mississippi, the
Mr. Govr. Morris was agst. striking out the “exception of Treaties of peace” If two thirds of the Senate should be required for peace, the Legislature will be unwilling to make war for that reason, on account of the Fisheries or the Mississippi, the two great objects of the Union. Besides, if a Majority of the Senate be for peace, and are not allowed to make it, they will be apt to effect their purpose in the more disagreeable mode, of negativing the supplies for the war. Mr. Williamson remar
Also tagged as: Made, Necessary, Make, States, Majority, Foreign, War, Power, Treaties, Union, Number, Peace, Senate, Legislature
Having reconsidered and amended the Fifth Clause of the Seventh Proposition, those proposed amendments which were not taken forward should be considered as having been dropped.
Also tagged as: Amendments
Having reconsidered and amended the Fifth Clause of the Seventh Proposition, those proposed amendments which were not taken forward should be considered as having been dropped.
Also tagged as: Amendments
Mr. Madison, objected to a trial of the President by the Senate, especially as he was to be impeached by the other branch of the Legislature, and for any act which might be called a misdemesnor. The President under these circumstances was made improperly dependent. He would prefer the supreme Court for the trial of impeachments, or rather a tribunal of which that should form a part. Mr Govr Morris thought no other tribunal than the Senate could be trusted. The Supreme Court were too few in nu
Mr. Madison, objected to a trial of the President by the Senate, especially as he was to be impeached by the other branch of the Legislature, and for any act which might be called a misdemesnor. The President under these circumstances was made improperly dependent. He would prefer the supreme Court for the trial of impeachments, or rather a tribunal of which that should form a part. Mr Govr Morris thought no other tribunal than the Senate could be trusted. The Supreme Court were too few in numb
Also tagged as: Made, Supreme, Houses, Cases, Law, Crimes, Court, Executive, President, Trial, Act, Office, Appointed, Number, Years, Judges, Senate, Legislature
Mr. Sherman opposed it— he thought the provision on that subject amply sufficient. Col: Hamilton expressed himself with great earnestness and anxiety in favor of the motion. He avowed himself a friend to a vigorous Government, but would declare at the same time, that he held it essential that the popular branch of it should be on a broad foundation. He was seriously of opinion that the House of Representatives was on so narrow a scale as to be really dangerous, and to warrant a jealousy in th
Mr. Sherman opposed it— he thought the provision on that subject amply sufficient. Col: Hamilton expressed himself with great earnestness and anxiety in favor of the motion. He avowed himself a friend to a vigorous Government, but would declare at the same time, that he held it essential that the popular branch of it should be on a broad foundation. He was seriously of opinion that the House of Representatives was on so narrow a scale as to be really dangerous, and to warrant a jealousy in the
Also tagged as: Necessary, President, Representatives, Government, Time, Subject, House, Senate, Legislature
Mr. Hamilton concurred with Mr. Gerry as to the indecorum of not requiring the approbation of Congress. He considered this as a necessary ingredient in the transaction. He thought it wrong also to allow nine States as provided by art XXI. to institute a new Government on the ruins of the existing one. He wd propose as a better modification of the two articles (XXI & XXII) that the plan should be sent to Congress in order that the same if approved by them, may be communicated to the State Legisla
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Proper, Think, Particular, Give, Provided, Establish, Duty, Different, Power, Second, Amendments, Propose, Made, Constitution, Government, Take, Legislature, Require, Necessary, Congress, Make, Whole, State, Act, Provide, Union, Legislatures, New
Mr. Gerry moved to reconsider art: XXI & XXII from the latter of which “for the approbation of Congs.” had been struck out. He objected to proceeding to change the Government without the approbation of Congress as being improper and giving just umbrage to that body. He repeated his objections also to an annulment of the confederation with so little scruple or formality. Mr. Hamilton concurred with Mr. Gerry as to the indecorum of not requiring the approbation of Congress. He considered this a
Draft Letter to Congress
Also tagged as: Congress, Time
Letter to Congress
Also tagged as: New, Congress, Time
Letter to Congress: First Paragraph
Also tagged as: New, Congress, Time
The draught of a letter to Congress being at the same time reported — was read once throughout, and afterwards agreed to by paragraphs. Editors' note: In order to model this process, a new version of the letter will be created, and the individual paragraphs proposed and agreed in order. This seems likely to have been unanimous.
Also tagged as: Congress, Time, New
The draught of a letter to Congress being at the same time reported — was read once throughout, and afterwards agreed to by paragraphs. Editors' note: Since there does not appear to be a record of this debate and the several accompanying votes, one vote will be used to represent agreement to the letter.
Letter to Congress: Second Paragraph
Also tagged as: New, Second, Congress, Time
The draught of a letter to Congress being at the same time reported — was read once throughout, and afterwards agreed to by paragraphs. Editors' note: In order to model this process, a new version of the letter will be created, and the individual paragraphs proposed and agreed in order. This seems likely to have been unanimous.
Also tagged as: Congress, Time, New
Letter to Congress: Third Paragraph
Also tagged as: New, Congress, Time
Mr. Williamson moved to reconsider the clause requiring three fourths of each House to overrule the negative of the President, in order to strike out ¾ and insert ⅔. He had he remarked himself proposed ¾ instead of ⅔, but he had since been convinced that the latter proportion was the best. The former puts too much in the power of the President. Mr. Sherman was of the same opinion; adding that the States would not like to see so small a minority and the President, prevailing over the general v
The draught of a letter to Congress being at the same time reported — was read once throughout, and afterwards agreed to by paragraphs. Editors' note: In order to model this process, a new version of the letter will be created, and the individual paragraphs proposed and agreed in order. This seems likely to have been unanimous.
Also tagged as: Congress, Time, New
Letter to Congress: Fourth Paragraph
Also tagged as: Congress, Time, New
The draught of a letter to Congress being at the same time reported — was read once throughout, and afterwards agreed to by paragraphs. Editors' note: In order to model this process, a new version of the letter will be created, and the individual paragraphs proposed and agreed in order. This seems likely to have been unanimous.
Also tagged as: New, Congress, Time
Mr. Sherman was of the same opinion; adding that the States would not like to see so small a minority and the President, prevailing over the general voice. In making laws regard should be had to the sense of the people. who are to be bound by them, and it was more probable that a single man should mistake or betray this sense than the Legislature Mr Govr Morris. Considering the difference between the two proportions numerically, it amounts in one House to two members only; and in the other to n
Also tagged as: States, Proper, Executive, Public, Years, Members, Term, Bound, Power, House, Office, Laws, Case, Vice-President, Cases, Senators, Take, Require, Legislature, Offices, Necessary, Given, According, Elected, President, Whole, Place, State, Consent, New, First
The Clause relating to exports being reconsidered, at the instance of Col: Mason, Who urged that the restriction on the States would prevent the incidental duties necessary for the inspection & safe-keeping of their produce, and be ruinous to the Staple States, as he called the five Southern States, he moved as follows — ‘provided nothing herein contained shall be construed to restrain any State from laying duties upon exports for the sole purpose of defraying the Charges of inspecting, packing,
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XIII: Mason's Amendment - Dickinson's Addition
Mr Govr Morris saw no objection to the motion. He did not consider the dollar per Hhd laid on Tobo in Virga. as a duty on exportation, as no drawback would be allowed on Tobo. [tobacco] taken out of the Warehouse for internal consumption, Mr. Dayton was afraid the proviso wd. enable Pennsylva. to tax N. Jersey under the idea of Inspection duties of which Pena. would Judge. Mr. Gorham & Mr. Langdon, thought there would be no security if the proviso shd. be agreed to, for the States exporting th
Also tagged as: Duties, States, Laid, Exports, Case, State, Jurisdiction, Tax, Laws, Duty, Supreme, Court, Cases, Acts, Made
Dickinson's Amendment Requiring Congressional Consent to Duties to Cover Cost of Customs Service
Also tagged as: Duties, Service, Consent, Given, States
Report on Ratification and Enactment of Constitution
Also tagged as: States, President, Congress, Constitution, electors, United, Senators, Day, Time, Place, Representatives, Appointed, Votes, Chosen, Elected, Directed, Proceedings, Legislature, Vote, Appoint, State, Give, Senate, Laid
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendment to the 13th article Provided that no State shall be restrained from imposing the usual Duties on produce exported from such State, for the sole purpose of defraying the charges of inspecting, packing, storing, and indemnifying the losses on such produce, while in the custody of public Officers: but all such regulations shall, in case of abuse, be subject to the revision and controul of Congress. which passed in the affirmative. [Aye
Also tagged as: Congress, Officers, Public, Regulations, State, Case, Vote, Duties, Subject, Provided, New
It was intimated on the other side that cases might arise where secrecy might be necessary in both Houses — Measures preparatory to a declaration of war in which the House of Reps. was to concur, were instanced.
It was intimated on the other side that cases might arise where secrecy might be necessary in both Houses — Measures preparatory to a declaration of war in which the House of Reps. was to concur, were instanced.
Also tagged as: Houses, House, Cases, Necessary, War
Pinckney's Amendment to Secure the Liberty of the Press
Also tagged as: Journal, Use
Mr. Bedford contended for an increase in favor of Rho: Island, and of Delaware also.
Mr. Bedford contended for an increase in favor of Rho: Island, and of Delaware also
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 10 - No State Restrained from Duties of Tonnage
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 10 - Restrictions Remoulded
Amendment Redrafting the Final Clause Article I: Section 10
Also tagged as: War, State, Congress, Peace, Lay, Consent, Foreign, Duty, Enter, Time, Power
The remainder of the paragraph was then remoulded and passed as follows viz— “No State shall without the consent of Congress, lay any duty of tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another State, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay” Editors' note: Madison does not provide a vote count.
Also tagged as: State, War, Congress, Consent, Peace, Time, Foreign, Vote, Duty, Enter, Lay, Provide, Power
Report of the Committee of Style - Article VII: Randolph for Amendments by State Conventions
Randolph's Amendment on Amendments by State Conventions Requiring a Second Constitutional Convention
Also tagged as: Made, Given, Congress, States, Constitution, United, Government, Power, State, Establish, Chosen, Second, Vote, Give, Take, Subject, Prescribed, Provide, Amendments, Laid, Legislature
Mr Randolph then rose and with an allusion to the observations of Docr Franklin, apologized for his refusing to sign the Constitution, notwithstanding the vast majority & venerable names that would give sanction to its wisdom and its worth. He said however that he did not mean by this refusal to decide that he should oppose the Constitution without doors. He meant only to keep himself free to be governed by his duty as it should be prescribed by his future judgment — He refused to sign, because
Mr Randolph then rose and with an allusion to the observations of Docr Franklin, apologized for his refusing to sign the Constitution, notwithstanding the vast majority & venerable names that would give sanction to its wisdom and its worth. He said however that he did not mean by this refusal to decide that he should oppose the Constitution without doors. He meant only to keep himself free to be governed by his duty as it should be prescribed by his future judgment — He refused to sign, because
Also tagged as: Constitution, States, Present, Subject, Objections, Take, Majority, Congress, Act, Member, Prescribed, First, War, Give, House, Consequence, Necessary, Make, Made, Bound, State, Laid, Given, Public, Holding, Presented, Place
Whilst the last members were signing it Doctr. Franklin looking towards the Presidents Chair, at the back of which a rising sun happened to be painted, observed to a few members near him, that Painters had found it difficult to distinguish in their art a rising from a setting sun. I have, said he, often and often in the course of the Session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that behind the President without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting
Also tagged as: Members, President
'The Honorable Richard Bassett, from the state of Delaware, appeared and took his seat.'
Also tagged as: State
'The honorable Ralph Izard, from the state of South Carolina, the honorable Charles Carroll, from the state of Maryland, and the honorable George Read, from the state of Delaware, severally produced their credentials, and took their seats in the Senate.'
Also tagged as: State, Senate
'The honorable Ralph Izard, from the state of South Carolina, the honorable Charles Carroll, from the state of Maryland, and the honorable George Read, from the state of Delaware, severally produced their credentials, and took their seats in the Senate.'
Also tagged as: State, Senate
'The honorable Ralph Izard, from the state of South Carolina, the honorable Charles Carroll, from the state of Maryland, and the honorable George Read, from the state of Delaware, severally produced their credentials, and took their seats in the Senate.'
Also tagged as: State, Senate
Virginia's Address to the Congress
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Representatives, Following, State, States, Constitution, People, Obtaining, Amendments, Time
Motion to Refer Virginia's Address
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Committed, State, Taken, States, Nature, Thirds, Number, Due, Fourth, Amendments, Time
'Mr. BLAND observed, that this application was made with a view of obtaining amendments to the constitution in one of the two modes pointed out in the 5th article; that copies of the application with an address had been sent to the several states, but that few of them seemed to have coincided with Virginia in opinion, and whether the apprehensions of the people of that state were well or ill founded, time alone would determine. He wished that the paper might be referred to a committee of the who
Also tagged as: Taken, States, Informed, Take, Best, Due, Place, United, Prescribed, State, Nature, Order, Obtaining, Exercise, House, Congress, Liberty, Constitution, According, Amendments, Time, People, Several, Committed, Subject, Thirds, Number
'Another member, to wit, John Vining, from Delaware, appeared and took his seat.'
'Another member, to wit, John Vining, from Delaware, appeared and took his seat' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 6 May 1789). [Editor's note: As both the House Journal and the Annals state, Vining arrived in Congress on 6 May 1789. However, the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day. As a result, he is here represented as joining the Committee of the Whole on its first meeting following his arrival.]
Also tagged as: State, House, Following, First, Congress
Motion to Resolve into Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: United, House, Resolved, Rights, States, Order, According, Time
'The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill for laying a duty on goods, wares, and merchandises, imported into the, United States. Mr. Speaker left the chair. Mr. Page took the chair of the committee.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Resolved, States, Order, According
Motion to Resolve into Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: United, House, Resolved, Rights, States, Order, According, Time
'The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill for laying a duty on goods, wares, and merchandises, imported into the United States. Mr. Speaker left the chair. Mr. Page took the chair of the committee.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Resolved, States, Order, According
Motion to Postpone Consideration of Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Amendments, Subject, States, Make, Take, Constitution, Number, Fourth, According, Fifth, Time
Madison's Motion to Consider Amendments in the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, State, Subject, States, Take, Constitution, Amendments, Fifth
Smith's Proposal for a Select Committee
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Public, Consent, Taken, State, States, Case, Subject, Take, Conventions, Necessary, Amendments, Time
'Mr. JACKSON.—I am of the opinion we ought not to be in a hurry with respect to altering the constitution. For my part, I have no idea of speculating in this serious manner on theory. If I agree to alterations in the mode of administering this Government, I shall like to stand on the sure ground of experience, and not be treading air. What experience have we had of the good or bad qualities of this constitution? Can any gentleman affirm to me one proposition that is a certain and absolute amend
Also tagged as: Senate, Taken, States, Take, Keep, Place, United, Jury, State, Answer, Congress, Government, Make, Certain, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, Respecting, Ground, Part, Subject, Put, Amendment, Deny
'Mr. MADISON.—I am sorry to be accessary [sic] to the loss of a single moment of time by the House. If I had been indulged in my motion, and we had gone into a Committee of the whole, I think we might have rose and resumed the consideration of other businesses before this time; that is, so far as it depended upon what I proposed to bring forward. As that mode seems not to give satisfaction, I will withdraw the motion, and move you, sir, that a select committee be appointed to consider and report
Also tagged as: Several, House, Congress, Proposed, Second, Legislatures, States, Constitution, Amendments, Fifth, Original, Time
Madison's Motion to Appoint a Select Committee on Amendments
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Effects, Congress, Proposed, Legislatures, States, Put, Constitution, Amendments, Fifth, Speech, Time
Madison's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: Use, Prevent, State, Disparage, Exercise, Freedom, Representative, Confidence, Liberty, Respecting, Time, Proposed, Things, Violated, Fourth, Amendment, Others, States, Establishment, United, Public, Order, Favor, Arising, Abridging, Government, Ratified, Right, Rights, Articles, Number, Fifth, Senate, Taken, Take, Conventions, Value, America, Required, Houses, Persons, Danger, First, Answer, House, Case, Controversy, Certain, Make, Constitution, Amendments, People, Necessary, Ground, Representatives, Legislatures, Court, Subject, Secure, Suits, Thirty, Enumeration, Press, Defence, Criminal, Thousand, Delegated, Security, Compelled, Fact, Best, Common, Retained, Compensation, Place, Purposes, Jury, Trial, Nature, Proportion, Warrants, Obtaining, Cases, Added, Reserved, Law, Congress, Exceed, Effect, Powers, Service, Varying, Several, Part, Put
'Mr. JACKSON.—The more I consider the subject of amendments, the more I am convinced it is improper. I revere the rights of my constituents as much as any gentleman in Congress, yet I am against inserting a declaration of rights in the constitution, and that for some of the reasons referred to by the gentleman last up. If such an addition is not dangerous or improper, it is at least unnecessary: that is a sufficient reason for not entering into the subject at a time when there are urgent calls f
Also tagged as: Press, Senate, Defence, Life, Security, Taken, States, Supported, Conventions, Take, Establishment, Infringed, Prevent, Due, Best, Place, Speech, Person, United, America, Jury, Peace, Required, Public, Trial, State, Order, Houses, Persons, Favor, Cases, Exercise, Private, First, Danger, Freedom, Law, House, Government, Congress, Property, Confidence, Case, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Ratified, Constitution, Powers, Right, Third, Amendments, Respecting, Time, Necessary, People, Several, Proposed, War, Representatives, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Consent, Suits, Secure, Subject, Addition, Desire, Part, Adopting, Number, Amendment, Deny
'Mr. SUMTER.—I consider the subject of amendments of such great importance to the Union, that I shall be glad to see it undertaken in any manner. I am not, Mr. Speaker disposed to sacrifice substance to form; therefore, whether the business shall originate in a Committee of the whole, or in the House, is a matter of indifference to me, so that it be put in train. Although I am seriously inclined to give this subject a full discussion, yet I do not wish it to be fully entered into at present, but
Also tagged as: States, Take, Conventions, Public, State, Obtaining, Exercise, House, Congress, Government, Confidence, Powers, Constitution, Amendments, People, Time, Respecting, Rights, Committed, Things, Subject, Put
'Mr. MADISON arose and withdrew his last motion for a select committee...' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 10 June 1789). *** 'Mr. MADISON found himself unfortunate in not satisfying gentlemen with respect to the mode of introducing the business; he thought from the dignity and peculiarity of the subject, that it ought to be referred to a Committee of the whole. He accordingly made that motion first, but finding himself not likely to succeed in that way, he had changed his groun
Also tagged as: United, House, Ground, Congress, Proposed, Following, States, Subject, Order, Amendment, Amendments, Original, Time
'Mr. LIVERMORE [of New Hampshire] was opposed to this resolve—he conceived it entirely improper for any individual member to propose any particular number of amendments, which do not take up the different amendments proposed by the several States. Mr. PAGE and Mr. [BLAND] LEE severally rose to justify Mr. Madison...and conceived that the mode he had adopted was just and fair—and calculated to bring the attention of the House to a proper point in determining the subject. Mr. MADISON observe
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Proposed, Others, States, Subject, Take, Number, Amendments, Time, Necessary
Boudinot's Motion to Appoint a Select Committee on Amendments
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, State, States, Amendments
'Mr. BOUDINOT wished the appointment of a select committee, but afterwards withdrew his motion' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 468).
Also tagged as: Congress
Delaware Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Several, Amendments, States
Motion to Resolve into Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: United, House, Imposed, Resolved, Rights, States, Order, According, Time
'The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the bill to regulate the collection of duties imposed on goods, wares, and merchandises, imported into the United States. Mr. Speaker left the chair. Mr. Trumbull took the chair of the Committee.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Imposed, Resolved, States, Order, According
Madison's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
Massachusetts Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
South Carolina Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Mr. SEDGWICK opposed the motion, for the reasons given by his colleague, observing that the members from the several States proposing amendments would no doubt drag the House through the consideration of every one, whatever their fate might be after they were discussed; now gentlemen had only to reflect on this, and conceive the length of time the business would take up, if managed in this way. Mr. WHITE thought no time would be saved by appointing a select committee. Every member would Iik
Also tagged as: Security, Taken, States, Supported, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Value, Trial, State, Houses, House, Congress, Government, Constitution, Witness, Amendments, Necessary, People, Several, Time, Proposed, Rights, Probable, Subject, Fifth
New Hampshire Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
Virginia Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
Gerry's Motion to Bring State Amendments Forward
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Proposed, State, Make, Conventions, Amendments
Amendments Proposed by the Virginia Convention
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Mr. PAGE replied, that such motion would be out of order, until the present question was determined. A desultory conversation ensued, and it was questioned whether the subject generally was to be before the Committee of the whole, or those specific propositions only which had already been introduced. Mr. GERRY said, that it was a matter of indifference how this question was understood, because no gentleman could pretend to deny another the privilege of bringing forward propositions conf
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Security, Taken, States, Take, Conventions, Keep, Fact, Prevent, Place, United, Required, Public, Less, State, Extending, Order, Houses, Added, Amendment, Danger, House, Government, Congress, Effect, Certain, Constitution, Amendments, Time, Respecting, People, Necessary, Several, Proposed, Rights, Part, Subject, Put, Thirds, Rules, Press, Deny
New York Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Ordered, That the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union be discharged from proceeding on a motion referred to the said committee, on the eighth day of June last, stating certain specific amendments proper to be proposed by Congress to the Legislatures of the States, to become, if ratified by three-fourths thereof, part of the Constitution of the United States; and that the said motion, together with the amendments to the said Constitution, as proposed by the several States, be
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Eighth, Congress, Proposed, Legislatures, State, Part, States, Subject, Certain, Take, Ratified, Adopting, Constitution, Amendments
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give ever
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Mr. PAGE hoped the House would agree to the motion of his colleague without hesitation, because he conceived it essentially necessary to proceed and finish the business as speedily as possible; for whatever might be the fact with respect to the security which the citizens of America had their rights and liberties under the new constitution, yet unless they saw it in that light, they would be uneasy, not to say dissatisfied. He thought, likewise, that the business would be expedited by the s
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Security, Taken, States, Informed, Supported, Take, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Keep, Best, Due, Fact, Place, Speech, Purposes, United, Peace, America, State, Nature, Proportion, Order, Favor, Added, Freedom, Danger, First, Law, House, Government, Congress, Land, Confidence, Effect, Certain, Make, Constitution, Amendments, Time, People, Necessary, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Consent, Crime, Desire, Subject, Secure, Part, Put, Number, Intervened, Press
'Mr. MADISON—Form, sir, is always of less importance than the substance; but on this occasion, I admit that form is of some consequence, and it will be well for the House to pursue that which, upon reflection, shall appear the most eligible. Now it appears to me, that there is a neatness and propriety in incorporating the amendments into the constitution itself; in that case the system will remain uniform and entire; it will certainly be more simple, when the amendments are interwoven into thos
Also tagged as: States, Supported, Take, Place, Original, United, Less, State, Order, Added, Arising, Law, House, Congress, Case, Liberty, Ratified, Constitution, Right, According, Amendments, People, Several, Proposed, Addition, Legislatures, Part, Suits, Ascertained, Amendment
Point of Order
Also tagged as: Order, House, Amendments, Congress, Proposed
'Mr. LIVERMORE was clearly of opinion, that whatever amendments were made to the constitution, they ought to stand separate from the original instrument. We have no right, said he, to alter a clause, any otherwise than by a new proposition. We have well-established precedents for such a mode of procedure in the practice of the British Parliament and the State Legislatures throughout America. I do not mean, however, to assert that there has been no instance of a repeal of the whole law on enactin
Also tagged as: Defence, Senate, Others, Taken, States, Valid, Take, Conventions, Use, Fact, Best, Retained, Place, Original, Purposes, United, America, Public, Less, State, Order, Houses, Favor, Cases, Exercise, First, Assembled, Law, House, Government, Congress, Oath, Case, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Ratified, Constitution, Powers, Right, Amendments, Respecting, Necessary, People, Time, Ground, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Intents, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Consent, Secure, Subject, Addition, Desire, Preserved, Part, Put, Adopting, Number, Amendment, Fifth, Construed
Mr. TUCKER.—I presume these propositions are brought forward under the idea of being amendments to the constitution; but can this be esteemed an amendment of the constitution? If I understand what is meant by the introductory paragraph, it is the preamble to the constitution; but a preamble is no part of the constitution. It is, to say the best, a useless amendment. For my part, I should as soon think of amending the concluding part, consisting of General Washington's letter to the President of
Also tagged as: Others, Taken, States, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Fact, Best, Place, Original, United, America, State, Exercise, Added, House, Congress, Certain, Constitution, Right, Amendments, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Addition, Desire, Part, Amendment
Vining's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Congress, Representatives, Second, Hundred, State, Desire, Forty, Secure, Constitution, Number, Amendment
Ames's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Thousand, Security, States, Take, Expressed, Prevent, Place, Original, United, Public, Proportion, Nature, Forty, Persons, Added, First, Representative, House, Government, Congress, Certain, Make, Amendments, According, Time, Respecting, Necessary, People, Proposed, Rights, Second, Subject, Thirty, Number, Capital, Amendment
Tucker's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: States, Take, Keep, Prevent, Place, United, Public, Less, Proportion, Amount, First, House, Congress, Hundred, Effect, According, People, Proposed, Representatives, Addition, Second, Thirty, Number, Enumeration, Amendment
'Mr. SHERMAN said, if they were now forming a constitution, he should be in favor of one representative for forty thousand, other than thirty thousand…So far was he from thinking a hundred and seventy-five insufficient, that he was about to move for a reduction, because he always considered that a small body deliberated to better purpose than a greater one. Mr. MADISON hoped gentlemen would not be influenced by what had been related to have passed in the convention; he expected the committee
Also tagged as: Thousand, Senate, Others, States, Expressed, Prevent, Best, Senators, United, Public, Less, Extending, Proportion, Insure, Forty, Favor, First, Representative, Answer, House, Government, Congress, Hundred, Case, Certain, Constitution, Amendments, People, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Addition, Consent, Legislatures, Thirty, Number, Enumeration, Amendment
'Mr. LIVERMORE wished to amend the clause of the report in such a manner as to prevent the power of Congress from deciding the rate of increase. He thought the constitution had better fix it, and let it be gradual until it arrived at two hundred. After which, if it was the sense of the committee, it might be stationary and liable to no other variation than that of being apportioned among the members of the Union. Mr. AMES suggested to the consideration of gentlemen, whether it would not be be
Also tagged as: Thousand, House, Congress, Second, Nature, Subject, Forty, Order, Make, Thirty, Constitution, Prevent, Number
'Mr. SMITH, of South Carolina, was in favor of [Ames's] motion. Mr. GERRY thought that the object of the motion was to prevent such a thorough discussion of the business as the nature of it demanded. He called upon gentlemen to recollect the consistency of his honorable colleague, who had proposed to refer the subject to a select committee, lest an open and full examination should lay bare the muscles and sinews of the constitution. He had succeeded on that occasion, and the business was put
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Proposed, Less, Legislatures, State, Nature, Subject, Put, Houses, Constitution, Prevent, Favor
'Mr. CARROLL.—As the rights of conscience are, in their nature, of peculiar delicacy, and will little bear the gentlest touch of governmental hand; and as many sects have concurred in opinion that they are not well secured under the present constitution, he said he was much in favor of adopting the words. He thought it would tend more towards conciliating the minds of the people to the Government than almost any other amendment he had heard proposed. He would not contend with gentlemen about the
Also tagged as: Effects, Others, Taken, Free, States, Compelled, Supported, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Prevent, Place, Person, Religion, Required, State, Nature, Cases, Favor, Exercise, First, Freedom, Law, Government, Congress, Make, Constitution, Necessary, People, Several, Proposed, Rights, Things, Court, Part, Subject, Secure, Put, Adopting, Regulated, Amendment, Construed
'Mr. TUCKER then moved to insert these words, “to instruct their Representatives.” Mr. HARTLEY wished the motion had not been made, for gentlemen acquainted with the circumstances of this country, and the history of the country from which we separated, differed exceedingly on this point. The members of the House of Representatives, said he, are chosen for two years, the members of the Senate for six. According to the principles laid down in the Constitution, it is presumable that the pers
Also tagged as: Defence, Effects, Senate, Press, Life, Others, Free, Taken, States, Informed, Grievances, Wherein, Valid, Use, Take, Expressed, Prevent, Due, Best, Common, Purposes, Speech, United, America, Required, Public, Less, State, Nature, Proportion, Order, Persons, Favor, Cases, Exercise, Obtaining, Arising, Danger, Petition, Freedom, Representative, Assemble, Answer, Assembled, House, Tried, Law, Government, Congress, Oath, Hundred, Redress, Confidence, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Constitution, Right, According, Amendments, Time, Necessary, People, District, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Probable, Legislatures, Consent, Part, Secure, Subject, Adopting, Number, Enumeration, Services, Amendment, Election
'Mr. GERRY.—Gentlemen seem in a great hurry to get this business through. I think, Mr. Chairman, it requires a further discusion [sic]; for my part, I had rather do less business and do it well, then precipitate measures before they are fully understood. The honorable gentleman from Virginia (Mr. MADISON) stated, that if the proposed amendments are defeated, it will be by the delay attending the discussion of doubtful propositions; and he declares this to partake of that quality. It is natur
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Security, States, Take, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Common, Place, Purposes, Public, Less, State, Nature, Order, Cases, Exercise, Private, Freedom, Representative, House, Government, Congress, Oath, Case, Effect, Make, Constitution, Right, Amendments, According, Time, People, Necessary, Several, Ground, District, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Part, Subject, Number, Amendment
'Mr. PAGE was sorry to see gentlemen so impatient; the more so, as he saw there was very little attention paid to any thing that was said; but he would express his sentiments if he was only heard by the Chair. He discovered clearly, notwithstanding what had been observed by the most ingenious supporters of the opposition, that there was an absolute necessity for adopting the amendment. It was strictly compatible with the spirit and the nature of the Government; all power vests in the people of t
Also tagged as: States, Grievances, Take, Conventions, Place, United, Peace, America, State, Nature, Favor, Exercise, Private, Added, Amendment, Representative, Law, House, Government, Congress, Redress, Case, Make, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, Necessary, People, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Part, Secure, Subject, Adopting, Number, Press
'Mr. LAWRENCE was averse to entering on the business at first; but since they had proceeded so far, he hoped they would finish it. He said, if gentlemen would confine themselves to the question when they were speaking, that the business might be done in a more agreeable manner. He was against the amendment proposed by the gentleman from South Carolina, (Mr. TUCKER,) because every member on this floor ought to consider himself the representative of the whole Union, and not of the particular dis
Also tagged as: Security, States, Take, Conventions, Fact, Speech, Jury, Required, Trial, State, Nature, Order, Houses, Obtaining, Amendment, Danger, Freedom, Representative, Government, Congress, Liberty, Make, Constitution, Amendments, Time, People, District, Proposed, Rights, Consent, Legislatures, Jeopardy, Press
Mr. GERRY.—This declaration of rights, I take it, is intended to secure the people against the mal-administration of the Government; if we could suppose that, in all cases, the rights of the people would be attended to, the occasion for guards of this kind would be removed. Now, I am apprehensive, sir, that this clause would give an opportunity to the people in power to destroy the constitution itself. They can declare who are those religiously scrupulous, and prevent them from bearing arms.
Also tagged as: Cases, Arms, Congress, Government, Rights, Militia, Secure, Order, Liberty, Use, Take, Establishment, Make, Prevent, Constitution, Powers, People, Necessary
[Editor's note: No source directly indicates that Jackson's proposal, as amended by Smith of South Carolina, was adopted at this point. The record seems to indicate that after the comments in opposition offered by Sherman and Vining, the motion was superseded by discussion of subsequent proposals on the floor, and was accordingly dropped (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 779-80). The amendment's phrasing, however, appears verbatim in the enumeration of articles of amendment as accepted
Also tagged as: House, Arms, Congress, Less, Second, State, Following, Articles, Certain, Amendment, Fact, Enumeration, Place, Time
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Fourth Clause
Also tagged as: Law, Soldier, House, United, Congress, Peace, Prescribed, War, Quartered, Consent, Taken, Owner, States, Amendment, Fourth, Time
Sumter's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, House, Soldier, Congress, Peace, War, Property, Quartered, Consent, Owner, States, Fourth, Cases, Amendment, Time
'Mr. SHERMAN observed that it was absolutely necessary that marching troops should have quarters, whether in time of peace or war, and that it ought not to be put in the power of an individual to obstruct the public service; if quarters were not to be obtained in public barracks, they must be procured elsewhere. In England, where they paid considerable attention to private rights, they billeted the troops upon the keepers of public houses, and upon private houses also, with the consent of the ma
Also tagged as: United, Peace, Congress, War, Rights, Public, Consent, States, Case, Put, Houses, Private, Service, Time, Necessary
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Seventh Clause
Also tagged as: Effects, States, Supported, Fourth, Place, Seventh, United, Warrants, Houses, Persons, Congress, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Seized, People, Rights, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
Benson's/Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Effects, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Following, States, Papers, Secure, Order, Fourth, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, Right, Issue, Amendment, People
'Mr. GERRY said that he presumed there was a mistake in the wording of this clause; it ought to be "the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable seizures and searches," and therefore moved that amendment. This was adopted by the committee' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783). *** 'Mr. BENSON moved to insert after the words "and effects," these words "against unreasonable searches and seizures." This was carried' (Ne
Also tagged as: United, Effects, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Following, States, Papers, Secure, Order, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, Right, Issue, Amendment, People
Benson's/Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Second, State, States, Warrants, Amendment, Declaratory, Issue, Fourth
'The question was put on this motion, and lost by a considerable majority' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783). *** 'This was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). [Editor’s note: The sources differ on who proposed this amendment and the one immediately preceding it, with the sources interchanging Elbridge Gerry and Egbert Benson. The Gazette of the United States reports that Egbert Benson made this motion to alter the amendment's wordin
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Second, State, States, Put, Issue, Amendment
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: Grand, Following, States, Militia, Place, Seventh, United, Person, Presentment, Jury, Public, Trial, State, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Answer, Law, House, Congress, Indictment, Resolved, Land, Infamous, Impartial, Amendments, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Crime, Subject, Actual, Capital, Amendment
‘Mr. TUCKER remarked, that many citizens expected that the amendments proposed by the conventions would be attended to by the House, and that several members conceived it to be their duty to bring them forward. If the House should decline taking them into consideration, it might tend to destroy that harmony which had hitherto existed, and which did great honour to their proceedings; it might affect all their future measures, and promote such feuds as might embarrass the Government exceedingly.
Also tagged as: States, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Best, Required, Order, Obtaining, Favor, Danger, Answer, House, Congress, Government, Confidence, Constitution, Amendments, People, Time, Several, Proposed, Rights, Preserved, Amendment
'Mr. MADISON objected to this amendment, because it was impossible to confine a Government to the exercise of express powers; there must necessarily be admitted powers by implication, unless the constitution descended to recount every minutia. He remembered the word "expressly" had been moved in the convention of Virginia, by the opponents to the ratification, and, after full and fair discussion, was given up by them, and the system allowed to retain its present form. Mr. SHERMAN coincided w
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Government, States, Powers, Expressed, Constitution, Exercise, Amendment
Sherman's Amendment to the House Report
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, States, Amendment, Constitution, Place, Amendments, People
'Mr. SHERMAN's motion was carried by two-thirds of the House; in consequence it was agreed to' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess, 795). *** 'Mr. SHERMAN bro't forward his motion for adding the amendments by way of supplement to the constitution; which was agreed to, by more than three fourths of the members present' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150. [Note that the section reporting the day's proceedings is mislabelled, 'WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20'; the correct
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Fourths, States, Constitution, Amendments
Ames's Amendment the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Thousand, Following, Taken, States, Prevent, United, Fifty, Forty, Amount, First, Representative, House, Congress, Effect, Time, Respecting, Representatives, Second, Thirty, Number, Enumeration, Amendment
'Mr. SCOTT objected to the clause in the sixth amendment, "No person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms." He observed that if this becomes part of the constitution, such persons can neither be called upon for their services, nor can an equivalent be demanded; it is also attended with still further difficulties, for a militia can never be depended upon. This would lead to the violation of another article in the constitution, which secures to the people the right of keeping
Also tagged as: Taken, States, Militia, Compelled, Use, Take, Person, United, Religion, Persons, Favor, Amendment, Law, Arms, Congress, Government, Case, Constitution, Right, According, Necessary, People, Several, Time, War, Part, Services, Defence
Report of the House - Fourth Proposition, Fourth Clause
Also tagged as: Seventh, Law, Soldier, House, Peace, Prescribed, War, Quartered, Consent, Fourth, Amendment, Owner, Amendments, Time
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations'
Also tagged as: Seventh, Law, Soldier, House, United, Congress, Eighth, Amendments, Prescribed, War, Peace, Quartered, Owner, States, Consent, Amendment, Clauses, Fourth, Third, Fifth, Time
Report of the House - Fourth Proposition, Seventh Clause
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, House, Congress, Searches, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Issue, Seized, Amendments, People, Time, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
Amendment to the Fourth Proposition, Seventh Clause
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, House, Congress, Searches, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Issue, Seized, Amendments, People, Time, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
[Editor's note: The tenth amendment came under the House's consideration at this point. None of the available sources specifically record the House taking up discussion, nor do any record debate on this provision. The sources, however, record that the provision was adopted. A comparison between the Committee of the Whole report and the report with amendments presented to the House reveals a few significant alterations introduced into this amendment. The Committee of the Whole report uses the phr
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, House, Congress, Searches, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Issue, Seized, Amendments, People, Time, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations'
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, United, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, Searches, Congress, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Seized, Clauses, Third, Amendments, People, Eighth, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment, Fifth
Report of the House - Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Law, Jury, House, Congress, According, Rights, Court, Dollars, Put, Controversy, Amendment, Fact, Constitution, Amount, Common, Rules, Place, Amendments, Value, Time
Amendment to the Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Law, Jury, House, Congress, According, Rights, Court, Dollars, Put, Controversy, Amendment, Fact, Constitution, Amount, Common, Rules, Place, Amendments, Value, Time
[Editor's note: The thirteenth amendment came under the House's consideration at this point. None of the available sources specifically record the House taking up discussion, nor do any record debate on this provision. The sources, however, record that the provision was adopted. A comparison between the Committee of the Whole report and the report with amendments presented to the House reveals a key alteration in the text that must have been undertaken at this point. The Committee of the Who
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Law, Jury, House, Congress, According, Rights, Court, Dollars, Put, Controversy, Amendment, Fact, Constitution, Amount, Common, Rules, Place, Amendments, Value, Time
Report of the House - Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Order, Forces, Cases, Arising, Amendment, Danger, House, Congress, Land, Constitution, Impartial, Amendments, Service, Time, War, Second, Actual, Fourth
Gerry's Amendment to the Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, Proposed, War, Second, Actual, Amendment
'Mr. GERRY then proposed to amend it by striking out these words, "public danger;" this being negatived...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1s sess., 797). *** 'Mr. GERRY moved to strike out these words "public danger" to insert foreign invasion. This was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision beginning, 'The trial of all crimes (except in cases of impeachment, and in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, Proposed, War, Second, Actual, Amendment
Motion to Strike Out Final Clause of the Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Actual, Amendment
'[I]t was then moved to strike out the last clause, "and if it be committed." &c. to the end. This motion was carried, and the amendment was adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** 'It was then moved to strike out the last clause "and if it be committed, &c." to the end. This motion obtained, and the amendment as it then stood adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision beginning, 'The trial
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Actual, Amendment
'[I]t was then moved to strike out the last clause, "and if it be committed." &c. to the end. This motion was carried, and the amendment was adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** 'It was then moved to strike out the last clause "and if it be committed, &c." to the end. This motion obtained, and the amendment as it then stood adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision beginning, 'The trial
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Actual, Amendment
‘Mr. AMES said, that inadequate regulations were equally injurious as having none, and that such an amendment as was now proposed would alter the constitution; it would vest the supreme authority in places where it was never contemplated. Mr. SHERMAN observed, that the Convention were very unanimous in passing this clause; that it was an important provision, and if it was resigned it would tend to subvert the Government. Mr. MADISON was willing to make very amendment that was required by t
Also tagged as: Others, States, Take, Prevent, Senators, United, America, Required, Public, Less, State, Prohibited, Order, Danger, First, Law, House, Government, Congress, Effect, Certain, Make, Powers, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Legislatures, Secure, Subject, Number, Amendment, Election
‘Mr. PAGE said, that he hoped every amendment to the constitution would be considered separately in the manner this was proposed, but he wished them considered fully; it ought to have been referred to the Committee of eleven, reported upon, and then to the Committee of the whole. This was the manner in which the House had decided upon all those already agreed to; and this ought to be the manner in which this should be decided; he should be sorry to delay what was so nearly completed on any accou
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, States, Prevent, Common, Value, United, Required, Less, State, Added, Danger, House, Congress, Government, Case, Liberty, Powers, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, Several, Proposed, War, Rights, Preserved, Subject, Secure, Amendment
Motion that Tucker's Proposed Amendment be Referred to the Committee of Eleven
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Danger, Others, Public, Consent, Part, States, Subject, Certain, Best, Amendment, Amendments, Time
Motion to Commit Tucker's Proposition to the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Arms, Congress, Government, Proposed, War, Taken, State, States, Secure, Take, Ratified, Conventions, Constitution, People, Amendment, Amendments, Original, Necessary
Amendment to Fifth Article
Also tagged as: Peace, Soldier, War, Consent, Following, Liberty, Houses, Cases, Amendment, Fifth, Time
Additional Proposed Amendment
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Congress, Proposed, War, Representatives, Inflicted, Following, State, States, Militia, Subject, Service, Articles, Constitution, Actual, Amendment, Punishments, Fines, Time
'On motion to add the following clause to the articles of amendment to the constitution of the United States, proposed by the House of Representatives, to wit: "That each state, respectively, shall have the power to provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, its own militia, whensoever Congress shall omit or neglect to provide for the same; that the militia shall not be subject to martial law, except when in actual service, in time of war, invasion, or rebellion; and when not in the actua
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Congress, Proposed, War, Representatives, Inflicted, Following, State, States, Militia, Subject, Service, Articles, Constitution, Actual, Amendment, Punishments, Fines, Time
Amendment to Seventh Article
Also tagged as: Grand, Life, Taken, Militia, Compelled, Use, Limb, Due, Deprived, Compensation, Seventh, Person, Jury, Presentment, Process, Public, Naval, Forces, Cases, Private, Arising, Danger, Answer, Law, Indictment, Property, Land, Case, Infamous, Liberty, Witness, Service, Time, War, Crime, Jeopardy, Subject, Put, Actual, Capital, Amendment, Criminal
'On motion that this last mentioned article be amended, to read as follows: "No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual service, in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject to be put in jeopardy of life or limb, for the same offence; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against hi
Also tagged as: Grand, Senate, Life, Taken, States, Militia, Compelled, Use, Limb, Due, Deprived, Compensation, Person, United, Presentment, Jury, Process, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Private, Danger, Answer, Law, Congress, Indictment, Property, Land, Case, Infamous, Liberty, Witness, Amendments, Service, Time, War, Crime, Jeopardy, Subject, Put, Actual, Capital, Criminal
Amendment to Reconsider the Stricken Tenth Article
Also tagged as: Jury, War, Public, Trial, Land, Militia, Naval, Tenth, Forces, Impartial, Cases, Actual, Arising, Amendment, Danger, Service, Time
Senate's Ninth Amendment
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Senate, Congress, Peace, Prescribed, Proposed, War, Quartered, Consent, Ninth, States, Articles, Amendment, Owner, Amendments, Fifth, Time
Senate's Tenth Amendment
Also tagged as: Effects, Senate, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Place, Seventh, United, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, House, Searches, Congress, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Issue, Seized, Amendments, People, Proposed, Probable, Things, Secure, Articles, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
Senate's Eleventh Amendment
Also tagged as: Grand, Senate, Life, Taken, States, Militia, Compelled, Use, Limb, Due, Deprived, Compensation, Seventh, United, Person, Presentment, Jury, Process, Public, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Private, Danger, Answer, Law, Eleventh, House, Indictment, Congress, Offense, Property, Land, Case, Infamous, Liberty, Witness, Amendments, Twice, Service, Time, Eighth, Proposed, War, Crime, Jeopardy, Subject, Articles, Put, Actual, Capital, Amendment, Criminal
Senate's Twelfth Amendment
Also tagged as: Grand, Senate, Life, Taken, States, Militia, Compelled, Use, Limb, Due, Deprived, Compensation, Seventh, Person, United, Presentment, Jury, Process, Public, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Private, Danger, Twelfth, Answer, Law, House, Indictment, Congress, Offense, Property, Land, Case, Infamous, Liberty, Witness, Amendments, Twice, Service, Time, Proposed, War, Crime, Jeopardy, Subject, Articles, Put, Actual, Capital, Amendment, Criminal
Senate's Thirteenth Amendment
Also tagged as: Grand, Senate, Life, Taken, States, Militia, Compelled, Use, Limb, Due, Deprived, Compensation, Seventh, United, Person, Presentment, Jury, Process, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Private, Danger, Answer, Law, House, Indictment, Congress, Offense, Property, Land, Case, Infamous, Liberty, Witness, Amendments, Twice, Service, Time, Proposed, War, Crime, Jeopardy, Subject, Articles, Put, Actual, Capital, Amendment, Criminal
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, before the vote is taken on this question, I desire to make some observations to the assembly in support of the points that I shall make; that you are absolutely without jurisdiction in the premises. It is true, a body of this kind has the physical power; a member may cast his vote through and because of his own volition to do an act which, joined with the votes of others, may result in the consummation of something; but he has not or may not have the legal right to do
Also tagged as: Election, Convention, Law, Evidence, Elected, Time, Legislative, Member, Determine, Case, Day, Territory, Made, People, Right, Act, Judge, Person, Persons, House, Members, Duty, First, Authority, Make, Vote, Seat, Sufficient, Proceedings, Votes, Jurisdiction, Subject, Government, United, Officer, Entitled, States, Cases, Laws, Qualification, Claims, Office, Congress, Place, Third, City, Legislature, Authorize, Proposition, Elections, Remain, Public, Terms, Taken, Rights, Effect, State, Number, Support, Second, Absence, Pass, Common, Trial, Admitted, District, Control, Purpose, Houses, Utah, Power
Mr. VAN HORNE. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention, as the mover of the motion, it becomes my duty to speak to the question of whether it shall prevail or not. You have heard an argument against the motion. With you will rest the question of whether it is right, whether it is just, whether it is equitable, and whether it is legal, that that motion shall prevail. To begin with, I will say that, so far as I, the mover of the motion, was actuated, I made that motion with a full adheren
Also tagged as: Convention, Elected, Act, Power, Right, Members, Election, Seat, People, Time, Purpose, Evidence, Law, Constitution, State, Lake, Salt, Day, Made, Third, Part, House, Determine, Vote, Utah, Territory, States, Cases, Elections, Authority, Make, Persons, Majority, Congress, Member, Entitled, Board, Number, City, Days, Business, Legislative, County, Case, Duties, First, Receive, Judgment, Duty, Votes, Proposition, Government, United, Appoint, Pass, According, Necessary, Proposed, Holding, Subject, Perform, Proper, Nothing, Secretary, Taken, Proceedings, Rights, Jurisdiction, Justice, Admission, Issue, Judge, Provided, Office, Laws, Court, Consist, Monday, Legislature, Least, Qualification
Motion to Amend Previous Motion
Also tagged as: Seat, Made, Purpose, Members, Third, First
The question being put and the ayes and noes called for; the vote was as follows: AYES_61. John R. Murdock Anderson Gibbs Peter Low Maughan Chidester Peterson Heyborne Hyde Ryan Coray J. E. Robinson Miller Brandley Eldredge Keith Kearns J. D. Murdock Stover Clark Maeser Jos. R. Murdock W. E. Robison Farr Strevell Driver Adams McFarland Kimball NOES_37. Peters William Low Thatcher Kerr Warrum Hughes Thoreson J. P. Low Hart Roberts Cal
Also tagged as: Declared, Vote
At the expiration of ten minutes the Convention was called to order and the following appointed as a committee for the purpose of determining the number and kind of standing committees that the Convention shall have: Messrs. Pierce, Salt Lake; Anderson, Beaver; Snow, Washington; Francis, Morgan; Allen, Piute; Chidester, Garfield; Peters, Box Elder; Howard, Emery; Roberts, Davis; Heyborne, Iron; Robinson, Kane; Keith, Summit; Ryan, Juab; Kerr, Cache; Stover, Tooele; Jolley, Sanpete; Corfman, Uta
Also tagged as: Salt, Following, Purpose, Washington, Grand, Number, Utah, San, Convention, Lake
Mr. TATLOCK. Mr. President, and gentlemen of the Convention: I am proud to salute a man who was born in the Territory, whose motto was “Our liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain.”On my way to the building this morning I was accosted by a number of your friends and my friends, the friends of this Convention, who imposed upon me the very pleasant and delicate duty of asking you to accept from them an emblem of your authority during the continuance of this Convention. The article whic
Also tagged as: Years, War, Salt, Duty, Territory, City, People, Made, Authority, Number, Grand, Trust, Part, State, Rights, Day, Necessary, Taken, Convention, Least, Lake
Appointments to Bring Mr. Christensen Forward
Also tagged as: Seat, Appoint
Mr. VARIAN. I hope this motion of Mr. Roberts will not prevail; the question of the compensation as was suggested in answer to my inquiry in relation to these offices can be settled hereafter. This Convention has now determined that it will have a stenographer. Let us name him and the Convention can fix the compensation afterwards. If there is any thought underlying in the Convention that we do not need a stenographer, it seems to me that the sooner we disabuse our minds of that impression the b
Also tagged as: Convention, House, Compensation, Business, Least, Vote, Name, Officer, Day, Money, Receive, Age, Made, Proceedings, Use, Proper, Place, Absence, Entitled, Reasons, Times, Equal, Legislative, Officers, Hereafter, State, Act, Third, Person, Due, Proposition, Days, Submitted, Justice, Offices, Subject, Paid, Salt, Matters
Motion to Swear in Mr. Robertson of Emery County
Also tagged as: County
Mr. RALEIGH. I second the motion. The PRESIDENT. Has there been a second to that motion? Mr. RICKS. Second the motion. Mr. GOODWIN. I hate to make my speech for fear no one will second it. There will not be a great many social entertainments in that house and we might just as well do penance there as to do it in this hall. I speak particularly on account of the outside public that they may have a place to see and hear. Mr. JAMES. Mr. President, I arise to second that motion. I have a furthe
Also tagged as: Subject, Made, Instruction, Taken, Judgment, County, Proper, Make, House, Sufficient, Day, Civil, Continue, Number, Convention, Members, Least, Second, Time, Salt, Court, Place, Part, Use, State, Public, Vote, Receive, Lake
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, there is a law on the statute governing the powers and duties of the territorial librarian, and under that law, the library and he are under the control of the judges of the supreme court. That law, with the rules under it, prohibit the taking of books from the library or pamphlets, except upon an order of some justice of the court. While I apprehend that this order would not have the force of a law, still it might serve to place the librarian in an embarrassing positi
Also tagged as: Private, Rate, Nothing, Law, Court, Territory, Judges, Place, Powers, Property, Supreme, Connected, Control, Justices, Justice, Duties, Proper, Territorial
Resolution on Seating Members [Resolution No. 13C]
Also tagged as: Years, First, Following, Adoption, Seat, Age, Members, Name, Member
Resolution No. 13C: Second Amendment: Amendment
Also tagged as: Seat, Second, Lake, Salt, Members
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, and gentlemen of the Convention, I favor the original motion for the reason that I believe as stated by the mover thereof a better feeling will prevail if the members will take their seats without regard to county or political party. I believe that it will be more satisfactory all around and for that reason I favor the original motion as put by Mr. Evans. Mr. EVANS (Weber.) Mr. President, I would like to know just what we are voting on. I am free to admit I do not ex
Also tagged as: Age, Providing, Make, Convention, Voting, Years, House, County, Counties, Members, Free
Standing Rules of the Constitutional Convention of the Territory of Utah: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Power, Provided, Make, Territory, Made, Utah, Convention, Second
Report from the Committee of Printing [Resolution No. 21B]
Also tagged as: Following, Secretary
The PRESIDENT. Then the ruling with regard to the debate going forward is correct.
Report of Committee on Printing [Resolution No. 27C]
Also tagged as: Lake, Salt, Companies