Search Results (55)

The Virginia Plan as Proposed
Also tagged as: Virginia Plan, Suffrage, Common Defense, General Welfare, Slavery, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, First Branch of National Legislature, Term Limits, State Sovereignty, Bicameral Legislature, Compensation, Veto, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Supreme Judiciary, Supreme Court, Lower Courts, Tribunal, Term of Office, Lifetime Appointment, Crime, Impeachment, State Legislature, State Legislatures, State Jurisdiction, New States, Amendment, Oath of Office
The Virginia Plan
Also tagged as: Virginia Plan, Suffrage, Common Defense, General Welfare, Slavery, National Legislature, First Branch of National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Term Limits, State Sovereignty, Bicameral Legislature, Compensation, Veto, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Supreme Judiciary, Supreme Court, Lower Courts, Tribunal, Term of Office, Lifetime Appointment, Crime, Impeachment, State Legislature, State Jurisdiction, New States, Amendment, Oath of Office
Randolph's Second Resolution [Virginia Plan]
Also tagged as: Proportional Representation, National Legislature, Suffrage, Slavery, Quotas of Contribution
Madison's Amendment to Randolph's Second Resolution [Virginia Plan]
Also tagged as: Slavery
Hamilton's Amendment to Randolph's Second Resolution [Virginia Plan]
Also tagged as: Suffrage, Slavery
Randolph's Second Resolution [Virginia Plan] - Sherman's Amendment on Both Branches
Also tagged as: Suffrage, House of Lords, House of Commons, Slavery, Free Inhabitants, Senate
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Second Resolution: Wilson/Pinckney Introduce "Three Fifths"
Also tagged as: Proportional Representation, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
Mr. Gerry. The idea of property ought not to be the rule of representation. Blacks are property, and are used to the southward as horses and cattle to the northward; and why should their representation be increased to the southward on account of the number of slaves, than horses or oxen to the north? Mr. Madison was of opinion at present, to fix the standard of representation, and let the detail be the business of a subcommittee. Madison copies this statement of Gerry's from Yates into his
Also tagged as: Property, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
Mr. Madison. Much stress had been laid by some gentlemen on the want of power in the Convention to propose any other than a federal plan. To what had been answered by others, he would only add, that neither of the characteristics attached to a federal plan would support this objection. One characteristic, was that in a federal Government, the power was exercised not on the people individually; but on the people collectively, on the States. Yet in some instances as in piracies, captures &c. the e
Also tagged as: Federal, New Jersey Plan
Mr L. Martin contended at great length and with great eagerness that the General Govt. was meant merely to preserve the State Governts: not to govern individuals: that its powers ought to be kept within narrow limits; that if too little power was given to it, more might be added; but that if too much, it could never be resumed: that individuals as such have little to do but with their own States; that the Genl. Govt. has no more to apprehend from the States composing the Union while it pursues p
Also tagged as: Confederation, Large State, Mode of Representation, National Government, National Judiciary, National Jurisdiction, National Legislature, Small State, State Government, State of Nature
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Seventh Resolution: Full Resolution (Simplified)
Also tagged as: First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Proportional Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, Three-Fifths Compromise
The discussion of yesterday resumed. Mr. Wilson. The question now before us is of so much consequence, that I cannot give it a silent vote — Gentlemen have said, that if this amendment is not agreed to, a separation to the north of Pennsylvania may be the consequence. — This neither staggers me in my sentiments or my duty. If a minority should refuse their assent to the new plan of a general government, and if they will have their own will, and without it, separate the union, let it be done;
Also tagged as: The Revolutionary War, Aristocracy, Articles of Confederation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, Interests, Large State, Legislative Branch, Monarchy, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Slavery, Small State, Suffrage, The People, The States, Virginia Plan
Proposals for the Consideration of the Committee of Eleven of July 2nd
Also tagged as: Equitable Ratio of Representation, Proportional Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Slavery, Suffrage, Three-Fifths Compromise
By the proceedings in the convention they were so equally divided on the important question of representation in the two branches, that the idea of a concilatory adjustment must have been in contemplation of the house in the appointment of this committee. But still how to effect this salutary purpose was the question. Many of the members, impressed with the utility of a general government, connected with it the indispensible necessity of a representation from the states according to their number
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Bicameral Legislature, Equitable Ratio of Representation, First Branch of National Legislature, Free Inhabitants, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Proportional Representation, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
Report of the Grand Committee
Also tagged as: Equitable Ratio of Representation, Proportional Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, Three-Fifths Compromise, Compensation, Equal Representation, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, National Treasury, Originating Money Bills, Power of the Purse
Mr. Ghorum apprehended great inconveniency from fixing directly the number of Representatives to be allowed to each State. He thought the number of Inhabitants the true guide; tho’ perhaps some departure might be expedient from the full proportion. The States also would vary in their relative extent, by separations of parts of the largest States. A part of Virga. is now on the point of a separation. In the province of Mayne a Convention is at this time deliberating on a separation from Masts. In
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Equal Representation, Equality, Equitable Ratio of Representation, Mode of Election, National Legislature, New States, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, The States
Mr. Sherman wished to know on what principles or calculations the Report was founded. It did not appear to correspond with any rule of numbers, or of any requisition hitherto adopted by Congs. Mr. Gorham. Some provision of this sort was necessary in the outset. The number of blacks & whites with some regard to supposed wealth was the general guide Fractions could not be observed. The Legislre. is to make alterations from time to time as justice & propriety may require, Two objections prevaile
Also tagged as: Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Property, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Slavery, New States
Mr. Williamson. thought it would be necessary to return to the rule of numbers. but that the Western States stood on different footing. If their property shall be rated as high as that of the Atlantic States, then their representation ought to hold a like proportion. Otherwise if their property was not to be equally rated. Mr Govr. Morris. The Report is little more than a guess. Wealth was not altogether disregarded by the Come. Where it was apparently in favor of one State whose nos. were su
Also tagged as: Property, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Large State, Slavery, Small State, Corruption, Equality, Interests, Suffrage, Republicanism
Mr. King. N. Hamshire has probably more than 120,000 Inhabts. and has an extensive country of tolerable fertility. Its inhabts therefore may be expected to increase fast. He remarked that the four Eastern States having 800,000 souls, have one-third fewer representatives than the four Southern States, having not more than 700,000 souls rating the blacks, as 5 for 3. The Eastern people will advert to these circumstances, and be dissatisfied. He believed them to be very desirous of uniting with the
Also tagged as: Census, Interests, Large State, National Legislature, Northern States, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representatives, Slavery, Small State, Southern States, Three-Fifths Compromise
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Williamson's Proposal
Also tagged as: Census, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Proportional Representation, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Williamson's Proposal ("Three Fifths" to be Struck)
Also tagged as: Proportional Representation, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
Mr Gerry thought that three-fifths of them was to say the least the full proportion that could be admitted. Mr. Ghorum. This ratio was fixed by Congs. as a rule of taxation. Then it was urged by the Delegates representing the States having slaves that the blacks were still more inferior to freemen. At present when the ratio of representation is to be established, we are assured that they are equal to freemen. The arguments on ye. former occasion had convinced him that three-fifths was pretty
Also tagged as: Equal Representation, Mode of Representation, Northern States, Property, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Slavery, Southern States, Three-Fifths Compromise
Mr. Govr. Morris said he had several objections to the proposition of Mr. Williamson. 1. It fettered the Legislature too much. 2. it would exclude some States altogether who would not have a sufficient number to entitle them to a single Representative. 3. it will not consist with the Resolution passed on Saturday last authorizing the Legislature to adjust the Representation from time to time on the principles of population & wealth or with the principles of equity. If slaves were to be considere
Also tagged as: Amendment, Census, Mode of Representation, Property, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Williamson's Proposal (Working Version): First Clause
Also tagged as: Census, Mode of Representation, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Slavery
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Williamson's Proposal (Working Version): "Three Fifths" Clause
Also tagged as: Census, Mode of Representation, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
The next clause as to three-fifths of the negroes considered, Mr. King. being much opposed to fixing numbers as the rule of representation, was particularly so on account of the blacks. He thought the admission of them along with Whites at all, would excite great discontents among the States having no slaves. He had never said as to any particular point that he would in no event acquiesce in & support it; but he wd. say that if in any case such a declaration was to be made by him, it would be
Also tagged as: Census, Mode of Representation, New States, Northern States, Property, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Slavery, Southern States, State Legislature, Three-Fifths Compromise
Mr Butler contended again that Representation sd. be according to the full number of inhabts. including all the blacks; admitting the justice of Mr. Govr. Morris’s motion. Mr. Mason also admitted the justice of the principle, but was afraid embarrassments might be occasioned to the Legislature by it. It might drive the Legislature to the plan of Requisitions. Mr. Govr. Morris, admitted that some objections lay agst. his motion, but supposed they would be removed by restraining the rule to
Also tagged as: Census, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Slavery, Suffrage, Taxation
Mr. Davie, said it was high time now to speak out. He saw that it was meant by some gentlemen to deprive the Southern States of any share of Representation for their blacks. He was sure that N. Carola. would never confederate on any terms that did not rate them at least as three-fifths. If the Eastern States meant therefore to exclude them altogether the business was at an end. Dr. Johnson, thought that wealth and population were the true, equitable rule of representation; but he conceived th
Also tagged as: Equality, Equitable Ratio of Representation, National Legislature, Northern States, Property, Representation, Slavery, Southern States, Suffrage, Taxation
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Second Proposal: Rule of Contribution by Direct Taxation (Elsworth & Butler)
Also tagged as: Equality, National Legislature, Property, Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, Taxation
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Second Proposal: Wilson's Reworking
Also tagged as: Census, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Property, Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, Taxation, The States
Mr. Govr. Morris opposed the alteration as leaving still an incoherence. If Negroes were to be viewed as inhabitants, and the revision was to proceed on the principle of numbers of inhabts. they ought to be added in their entire number, and not in the proportion of 3/5. If as property, the word wealth was right, and striking it out would. produce the very inconsistency which it was meant to get rid of. — The train of business & the late turn which it had taken, had led him he said, into deep med
Also tagged as: Colonies, Equal Representation, Equality, First Branch of National Legislature, Northern States, Property, Representation, Secession, Second Branch of National Legislature, Slavery, Southern States, Suffrage, Union, Civil Rights, Eastern States, Middle States
Mr. Dayton. The smaller States can never give up their equality. For himself he would in no event yield that security for their rights. Mr. Sherman urged the equality of votes not so much as a security for the small States; as for the State Govts. which could not be preserved unless they were represented & had a negative in the Genl. Government. He had no objection to the members in the 2d b. voting per capita, as had been suggested by Mr. Gerry. Mr. Madison concurred in the motion of Mr.
Also tagged as: Coercive power, Confederation, Constitutional Convention, Equal Representation, Equitable Ratio of Representation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, General Government, House of Representatives, Judicial Branch, Large State, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Mode of Representation, National Government, National Legislature, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Small State, Southern States, The Confederation
Mr. Governeur Morris. It is necessary to take into one view all that relates to the establishment of the Executive; on the due formation of which must depend the efficacy & utility of the Union among the present and future States. It has been a maxim in political Science that Republican Government is not adapted to a large extent of Country, because the energy of the Executive Magistracy can not reach the extreme parts of it. Our Country is an extensive one. We must either then renounce the bles
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Executive, Executive Appointment, Executive Branch, Executive Corruption, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Impeachment, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Length of Term, Lifetime Appointment, Mode of Election, National Legislature, Northern States, Republican, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate, Separation of Powers, Slavery, Southern States, Term Limits, Union
Mr. King wished to know what influence the vote just passed was meant have on the succeeding part of the Report, concerning the admission of slaves into the rule of Representation. He could not reconcile his mind to the article if it was to prevent objections to the latter part. The admission of slaves was a most grating circumstance to his mind, & he believed would be so to a great part of the people of America. He had not made a strenuous opposition to it heretofore because he had hoped that t
Also tagged as: Amendment, Equitable Ratio of Representation, First Branch of National Legislature, General Government, House of Representatives, National Legislature, New States, Northern States, Proportional Representation, Slavery, Taxation
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article IV: Section 4 - Morris/Dayton for "Free Inhabitants"
Also tagged as: Equitable Ratio of Representation, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Slavery
Mr Govr. Morris moved to insert “free” before the word “inhabitants.” Much he said would depend on this point. He never would concur in upholding domestic slavery. It was a nefarious institution — It was the curse of heaven on the States where it prevailed. Compare the free regions of the Middle States, where a rich & noble cultivation marks the prosperity & happiness of the people, with the misery & poverty which overspread the barren wastes of Va. Maryd. & the other States having slaves. Trave
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Eastern States, Equal Representation, Equality, Equitable Ratio of Representation, Free Inhabitants, Georgia, Legislative Branch, Maryland, Middle States, Mode of Representation, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Northern States, Pennsylvania, Property, Representation, Slavery, South Carolina, Southern States, Taxation, Virginia, Western States, Africa, Suffrage
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article IV: Section 4 - Dickinson for At Least One Representative Per State
Also tagged as: Equal Representation, Mode of Representation, The States
Mr Sherman had no objection to the proviso here, other than it would derange the parts of the report as made by the Committee, to take them in such an order. Mr. Rutlidge. It being of no consequence in what order points are decided, he should vote for the clause as it stood, but on condition that the subsequent part relating to negroes should also be agreed to. Mr. Governeur Morris considered such a proviso as inadmissible any where. It was so radically objectionable, that it might cost th
Also tagged as: Congress, Divided sovereignty, Exports, Impost, National Legislature, Northern States, Slavery, Southern States, Taxation, Trade
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 4 - Second Clause: Martin for "Free Persons"
Also tagged as: Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Slavery, Taxation
Mr L— Martin, proposed to vary the sect: 4. art VII so as to allow a prohibition or tax on the importation of slaves. 1. As five slaves are to be counted as 3 free men in the apportionment of Representatives; such a clause wd. leave an encouragement to this trafic. 2 slaves weakened one part of the Union which the other parts were bound to protect: the privilege of importing them was therefore unreasonable — 3. it was inconsistent with the principles of the revolution and dishonorable to the Ame
Also tagged as: Immigration, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Maryland, National Legislature, Northern States, Revenue, Slavery, South Carolina, Southern States, Taxation, Trade, Virginia
Art. VII sect 4. resumed. Mr. Sherman was for leaving the clause as it stands. He disapproved of the slave trade: yet as the States were now possessed of the right to import slaves, as the public good did not require it to be taken from them, & as it was expedient to have as few objections as possible to the proposed scheme of Government, he thought it best to leave the matter as we find it. He observed that the abolition of slavery seemed to be going on in the U. S. & that the good sense of the
Also tagged as: Congress, Cromwell, General Government, Greece, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Northern States, Quakers, Rome, Slavery, Southern States, State power, Taxation, Trade, Union, Western States
Report of the Grand Committee on Taxation
Also tagged as: Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Slavery, Taxation
Mr. Govr. Morris was for making the clause read at once, “importation of slaves into N. Carolina, S— Carolina & Georgia”. shall not be prohibited &c. This he said would be most fair and would avoid the ambiguity by which, under the power with regard to naturalization, the liberty reserved to the States might be defeated. He wished it to be known also that this part of the Constitution was a compliance with those States. If the change of language however should be objected to by the members from
Report of the Committee of Style - insert cross-references to Article 1.
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 4: Section 2 - Third Clause: "Legally" Replaced with "Under the Laws Thereof"
Article No. 2.2: Section 22
Also tagged as: State, Convicted
Mr. CHIDESTER. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, I do not deem it necessary to enter into a full discussion of this question now, for the reason that I believe that the question has been fully settled in the hearts and minds of the people. Notwithstanding the statements that have been made this morning, I believe that the question has been thoroughly ventilated, and that the people have virtually passed upon it. I believe when the platforms were adopted by the two political parties th
Also tagged as: People, Equal, Made, Convention, Place, Part, Majority, Become, Subject, Justice, Proposition, Power, Age, Elections, Franchise, Make, County, Consent, Purpose, Elected, Entitled, Congress, Property, Religious, Exercise, Governor, Act, Free, Territory, Case, Public, Duty, System, Least, According, Powers, Real, Created, Submitted, Nothing, Granting, Incorporated, Members, Union, Member, Process, Trust, Constitution, Government, Civil, Laws, States, Right, Years, Institutions, First, Law, Time, State, United, Utah, Vote, Rights
Mr. THURMAN. Will the gentleman yield to me for a question_I am very sorry for this interruption, but I want to ask if the plank put in the democratic platform raised any issue between the parties? I am sorry to interrupt you, because I know that it puts the speaker to a disadvantage. But you had made the remark that the planks were inconsistent, the one which declares for a non-partisan constitutional convention, and the other which declared in favor of woman's suffrage. Now, I ask you if that
Also tagged as: Paid, Subject, Made, Grant, Granted, Value, Act, Constitution, Voting, Several, County, Lake, Government, Power, Make, House, Nothing, Become, Property, Fixed, Day, Control, Proposition, Free, Issue, Name, Taxation, Proceedings, Declared, Territory, Legislative, Board, People, Equal, Number, Reasons, Support, Laws, States, Consent, Convention, Effect, Proposed, Members, Second, Case, Time, Salt, Law, Person, Franchise, Place, Part, State, Exercise, United, Public, Majority, Utah, Vote, Right, Rights, Senator
The CHAIRMAN. Gentlemen of the committee, when we adjourned yesterday, I believe we had under consideration, the article on elections and right of suffrage. Mr. ELDREDGE. Mr. Chairman, at first I did not intend to speak to the question which is before us for consideration, but as it has taken such a wide range, and has circumscribed a vast field for reflection, I feel that I cannot pass the opportunity of speaking and expressing a few words on this subject. I have no set speech prepared and wha
Also tagged as: People, Made, Convention, Part, Franchise, Exercise, Place, Equal, Common, Consent, Territory, Proposition, States, Make, Subject, Majority, Trust, Laws, First, Union, Grant, Day, Act, Institutions, Civil, Powers, Property, Religious, Issue, Passed, Entitled, Duty, Persons, Cast, Election, Least, Territorial, Purposes, Representatives, Person, Constitution, County, Government, Power, Purpose, Free, Time, Law, State, Utah, Vote, Right, Rights
Mr. JOLLEY. Mr. Chairman, I seconded the motion on Saturday. Mr. Roberts had all the time that he wished in the closing of this debate. This is my first speech, gentlemen, upon this floor since the Convention met. I ask your indulgence a few moments. I will be brief. The CHAIRMAN. Go on. Mr. JOLLEY. Those senators in the east would say to ours, “You do not view those things right, be a little patient, agree with us for the single standard, and in a short time we will have shipped loads of gold
Also tagged as: People, Votes, Convention, Equal, Made, Proposition, Salt, Lake, Majority, Duty, Counties, Judge, Part, Change, Age, Case, Place, State, Day, Free, Final, Personal, Senators, Use, Created, Union, Continue, Granting, Make, Pay, Incorporated, Issue, Keep, Judgment, Purpose, Act, Powers, Taken, Passed, Entitled, Elected, Religious, Member, Members, City, Constitution, County, House, Territory, Years, Time, Utah, Vote, Right, Rights
Mr. WHITNEY. Mr. President, in what few remarks I make I shall endeavor to respect the wise admonition of the chair and avoid all personal allusions. I certainly have no desire to use any acrimonious language. There has been too much bitterness indulged in already, and I shall say nothing to augment the stream of gall and wormwood. I would prefer to say to these troubled waves of thought and feeling, “Peace; be still.” I disclaim all bitterness, so far as my remarks during these debates are conc
Also tagged as: People, Convention, Proposition, Monday, Majority, Made, Equal, Make, Keep, Judgment, Nothing, Determine, Election, Members, Executive, Public, Place, Regular, Law, Proper, Votes, Elections, Authority, Taken, Granting, Issue, Cast, Territory, Least, Times, Effect, Passed, Fixed, Justice, City, Act, Constitution, County, House, Purpose, Day, Elected, Years, Time, First, State, Utah, Vote, Right, Rights
Mr. MORRIS. Mr. President, I object to delaying this matter for various reasons, or to referring it to the committee or the Legislature either on this ground. When we were elected as delegates to different conventions we were sent there as agents or representatives of the people to do that business for them. I attended a Convention in Provo when they placed that plank in the republican platform, and I do not remember of a single voice of objection to that plank. Since that I read the plank of th
Also tagged as: Made, Grant, Constitution, Several, Voting, Taken, Change, Government, Business, Nothing, House, Days, Legislature, Proposition, Day, Free, Elected, Election, Declared, People, Equal, Congress, Reasons, Convention, Created, Representatives, Time, Salt, Place, Part, Utah, Monday, Vote, Right, Lake, Effect
Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. Chairman, I want to say in support of the motion to strike out section 5 that it provides that the Legislature shall prohibit first, the employment of women or children under the age of fourteen years. Now, that is proper enough in a legislative enactment, but no abuses as I understand it have ever occurred in Utah with respect to matters of that kind. If it ever does occur in the future the Legislature will amply provide for it, and why put it in the Constitution? The nex
Also tagged as: Labor, Support, Made, Member, Proper, Contract, Rights, Several, Legislative, Union, Provisions, Make, Power, Laws, Purpose, Case, Pass, Common, Act, Office, Bill, Passed, Elected, People, Convention, Prevent, Part, First, Dollars, Hereafter, Public, War, Criminal, Nothing, Time, Proposition, Taxes, Taken, Trust, Taxed, Subject, Keep, Age, United, Place, City, Provide, Constitution, County, Legislature, Territory, Number, States, Years, Law, Courts, State, Utah, Right
Mr. ROBERTS. I ask the gentleman if he does not recollect a petition that I myself introduced, signed by more than two thousand people from this city, asking that prohibition be neither put in the Constitution nor submitted as a separate article? Mr. MILLER. I have no recollection of it, sir. It may have been presented when I was not present. Mr. ROBERTS. It is a fact, however. Mr. MILLER. If that be the fact, Mr. Chairman, I recall the assertion that I made. Mr. THATCHER. Mr. Chairman and
Also tagged as: People, Made, Convention, Use, Majority, Make, Proposition, Subject, Submitted, Part, Duty, Purpose, Sale, Day, Keep, Money, Power, Government, Legislative, Court, System, Rights, Pass, Pay, Salt, Lake, Place, Exercise, Case, Contract, First, San, Judgment, Property, Public, Issue, Passed, Places, Supreme, County, Least, Dollars, Proper, Water, Days, City, Constitution, Officers, Business, Legislature, Control, Territory, Laws, States, Years, Time, Law, Town, State, United, Utah, Vote, Right
Mr. MALONEY. You say the Legislature in 1892 invaded the field already occupied by Congress. On the approval of this Constitution by the President, would not that act of the Legislature be in just as full force and effect as any act of the Legislature which is continued in full force by section 2 of this act? Mr. VARIAN. No. Mr. MALONEY. Why not? Mr. VARIAN. Because you can only continue in force a law. If there is anything in the form of an act that is not a law_for instance, we will say it
Also tagged as: People, Convention, Make, Nothing, Effect, Territorial, Lake, Least, Penalties, Salt, Made, Bill, Adoption, Declared, Offenses, Prevent, Provisions, Washington, Proposition, Sufficient, Support, Fixed, Taken, Reasons, Evidence, Proposed, Rights, Passed, Use, Public, Vote, Number, Case, Years, Elected, Member, Duty, Act, Constitution, Power, Purpose, Legislature, Provided, Territory, Congress, Laws, States, Time, Law, State, United, Utah, Right