Search Results (912)

The Virginia Plan as Proposed
Also tagged as: Virginia Plan, Suffrage, Common Defense, General Welfare, Slavery, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, First Branch of National Legislature, Term Limits, State Sovereignty, Bicameral Legislature, Compensation, Veto, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Supreme Judiciary, Supreme Court, Lower Courts, Tribunal, Term of Office, Lifetime Appointment, Crime, Impeachment, State Legislature, State Legislatures, State Jurisdiction, New States, Amendment, Oath of Office
The third underwent a discussion, less however on its general merits than on the force and extent of the particular terms national & supreme. Mr. Charles Pinkney wished to know of Mr. Randolph whether he meant to abolish the State Governts. altogether. Mr. R. replied that he meant by these general propositions merely to introduce the particular ones which explained the outlines of the system he had in view. Mr. Butler said he had not made up his mind on the subject, and was open to the lig
Also tagged as: Consolidated government, Divided sovereignty, National Government, Coercive power, The States, Individuals, Federal, Congress
Mr. Reed moved that the whole clause relating to the point of Representation be postponed; reminding the Come. that the deputies from Delaware were restrained by their commission from assenting to any change of the rule of suffrage, and in case such a change should be fixed on, it might become their duty to retire from the Convention. Mr. Govr. Morris observed that the valuable assistance of those members could not be lost without real concern, and that so early a proof of discord in the conv
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Sixth Resolution: Second Clause (Legislative Rights in Congress)
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Seventh Resolution (Executive Branch): Randolph Original
Also tagged as: National Legislature, Executive Branch, Mode of Election, Compensation, Eligibility for Office, Second Term, Executive Power, Confederation
Mr. Pinkney was for a vigorous Executive but was afraid the Executive powers of the existing Congress might extend to peace & war &c which would render the Executive a Monarchy, of the worst kind, to wit an elective one.
Also tagged as: Monarchy, Executive Power, Power of War
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Twelfth Resolution: Randolph's Original
Also tagged as: Congress
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Sixth Resolution: Power to Negative All Improper Laws
Also tagged as: Veto, Treaties, Negative, National Government, State Legislatures, National Legislature, Checks on Power, Separation of Powers, Federalism
Mr. Williamson was agst. giving a power that might restrain the States from regulating their internal police. Mr. Gerry cd. not see the extent of such a power, and was agst. every power that was not necessary. He thought a remonstrance agst. unreasonable acts of the States wd. reclaim them. If it shd. not force might be resorted to. He had no objection to authorize a negative to paper money and similar measures. When the confederation was depending before Congress, Massachusetts was then for
Also tagged as: Federalism, State Sovereignty, Checks on Power, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Veto, Negative, Suffrage, Representation, Proportional Representation
The question being abt. to be put Docr. Franklin sd. he had thrown his ideas of the matter on a paper wch. Mr. Wilson read to the Committee in the words following — Mr Chairman It has given me a great pleasure to observe that till this point, the proportion of representation, came before us, our debates were carried on with great coolness & temper. If any thing of a contrary kind, has on this occasion appeared. I hope it will not be repeated; for we are sent here to consult not to contend,
Also tagged as: Representation, Interests, Proportional Representation
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Second Resolution: Wilson/Pinckney Introduce "Three Fifths"
Also tagged as: Proportional Representation, Slavery, Three-Fifths Compromise
Virginia Plan [Resolutions] - Fourth Resolution: Madison/Mason on Compensation
Also tagged as: Compensation, National Legislature, Legislative Branch
Mr. Lansing called for the reading of the 1st. resolution of each plan, which he considered as involving principles directly in contrast; that of Mr. Patterson says he sustains the sovereignty of the respective States, that of Mr. Randolph distroys it: the latter requires a negative on all the laws of the particular States; the former, only certain general powers for the general good. The plan of Mr. R. in short absorbs all power except what may be exercised in the little local matters of the St
Also tagged as: State Sovereignty, Constitutional Convention, National Government, Negative, Representation
Mr. Randolph. was not scrupulous on the point of power. When the salvation of the Republic was at stake, it would be treason to our trust, not to propose what we found necessary. He painted in strong colours, the imbecility of the existing confederacy, & the danger of delaying a substantial reform. In answer to the objection drawn from the sense of our Constituents as denoted by their acts relating to the Convention and the objects of their deliberation, he observed that as each State acted sepa
Also tagged as: Coercive power
Mr. Hamilton, had been hitherto silent on the business before the Convention, partly from respect to others whose superior abilities age & experience rendered him unwilling to bring forward ideas dissimilar to theirs, and partly from his delicate situation with respect to his own State, to whose sentiments as expressed by his Colleagues, he could by no means accede. The crisis however which now marked our affairs, was too serious to permit any scruples whatever to prevail over the duty imposed o
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Virginia Plan, New Jersey Plan, Democracy, Corruption, Tyranny, National Executive, National Legislature, National Judiciary, Federalism, Monarchy, Term Limits, Negative, Veto, Executive Pardon, Mode of Appointment, Lifetime Appointment, Good Behavior, The States, Tribunal, Lower Courts, Compensation
Mr. Madison. Much stress had been laid by some gentlemen on the want of power in the Convention to propose any other than a federal plan. To what had been answered by others, he would only add, that neither of the characteristics attached to a federal plan would support this objection. One characteristic, was that in a federal Government, the power was exercised not on the people individually; but on the people collectively, on the States. Yet in some instances as in piracies, captures &c. the e
Also tagged as: Federal, New Jersey Plan
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee
Also tagged as: National Government, Virginia Plan, Three-Fifths Compromise, Bicameral Legislature, Supreme Executive, Supreme Legislative, Supreme Judiciary, New Jersey Plan, Republican, Guarantee, Indians, Amendment, State Legislatures, The People, Single Executive, National Executive, National Treasury, National Legislature, National Judiciary, Committee of the Whole, Admission of States, Compensation, First Branch of National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Suffrage, Union, United States, Harmony, Congress, Term of Office, Impeachment, Separation of Powers, Inferior Tribunals, Revenue
Mr. Wilson observed that by a Natl. Govt. he did not mean one that would swallow up the State Govts. as seemed to be wished by some gentlemen. He was tenacious of the idea of preserving the latter. He thought, contrary to the opinion of (Col. Hamilton) that they might not only subsist but subsist on friendly terms with the former. They were absolutely necessary for certain purposes which the former could not reach. All large Governments must be subdivided into lesser jurisdictions. as Examples
Also tagged as: National Government, State Legislatures, Jurisdiction, State Sovereignty, Independence, Union, Rome, Ancient World, Virginia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Small State, Large State, Consolidated government, Delaware, State of Nature, Confederation, Congress, Suffrage
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Second Resolution: Lansing's Replacement
Also tagged as: Legislative Power
Mr. Lansing... He had already assigned two reasons agst. such an innovation as was proposed. 1. the want of competent powers in the Convention — 2. the state of the public mind. It had been observed by Mr. Madison in discussing the first point, that in two States the Delegates to Congs. were chosen by the people. Notwithstanding the first appearance of this remark, it had in fact no weight, as the Delegates however chosen, did not represent the people merely as so many individuals; but as formin
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Coercive power, Confederation, Corruption, Legislative Power, Mode of Election, National Government, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Republican, State Legislatures, State Sovereignty, Taxation
Mr. Ghorum moved to strike out the last member of 3 Resol: concerning ineligibility of members of 1st branch to offices, during the term of their membership & for one year after. He considered it as unnecessary & injurious. It was true abuses had been displayed in G. B. but no one cd. say how far they might have contributed to preserve the due influence of the Gov’t nor what might have ensued in case the contrary theory had been tried. Mr. Butler opposed it. this precaution agst. intrigue was
Also tagged as: Corruption
Mr. Rutlidge, was for preserving the Legislature as pure as possible, by shutting the door against appointments of its own members to offices, which was one source of its corruption. Mr. Mason. The motion of my colleague is but a partial remedy for the evil. He appealed to him as a witness of the shameful partiality of the Legislature of Virginia to its own members. He enlarged on the abuses & corruption in the British Parliament, connected with the appointment of its members. He cd. not supp
Also tagged as: Eligibility for Office, Corruption, Interests, Abuse, Legislative Appointment, Merit, Virtue
Mr. Mason. We must retain this clause, otherwise evasions may be made. The legislature may admit of resignations and thus make members eligible — places may be promised at the close of their duration, and that a dependency may be made. Mr. Gerry. And this actually has been the case in congress — a member resigned to obtain an appointment, and had it failed he would have resumed it. Mr. Hamilton. The clause may be evaded many ways. Offices may be held by proxy — they may be procured by frie
Mr. Madison, considered this a departure from a fundamental principle, and subverting the end intended by allowing the Senate a duration of 6 years. They would if this motion should be agreed to, hold their places during pleasure; during the pleasure of the State Legislatures. One great end of the institution was, that being a firm, wise and impartial body, it might not only give stability to the Genl. Govt. in its operations on individuals, but hold an even balance among different States. The m
Also tagged as: Compensation, Congress, Divided sovereignty, Equal Representation, Length of Term, National Treasury, State Treasury
Mr. Madison. Congress heretofore depended on state interests — we are now going to pursue the same plan. Mr. Wilson. Congress has been ill managed, because particular states controlled the union. In this convention, if a proposal is made promising independency to the general government, before we have done with it, it is so modified and changed as to amount to nothing. In the present case, the states may say, although I appoint you for six years, yet if you are against the state, your table
Also tagged as: National Government, State power
Dr. Johnson. As the debates have hitherto been managed, they may be spun out to an endless length; and as gentlemen argue on different grounds, they are equally conclusive on the points they advance, but afford no demonstration either way. States are political societies. For whom are we to form a government? for the people of America, or for those societies? Undoubtedly for the latter. They must, therefore, have a voice in the second branch of the general government, if you mean to preserve thei
Also tagged as: Confederation, Divided sovereignty, National Government, Parliament, Proportional Representation, State Government, State Sovereignty
Judge Elsworth. I now move the following amendment to the resolve — that in the second branch each state have an equal vote. I confess that the effect of this motion is, to make the general government partly federal and partly national. This will secure tranquility, and still make it efficient; and it will meet the objections of the larger states. In taxes they will have a proportional weight in the first branch of the general legislature — If the great states refuse this plan, we will be for ev
Also tagged as: Divided sovereignty, Equal Representation, Executive, Large State, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Quotas of Contribution, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Small State
The discussion of yesterday resumed. Mr. Wilson. The question now before us is of so much consequence, that I cannot give it a silent vote — Gentlemen have said, that if this amendment is not agreed to, a separation to the north of Pennsylvania may be the consequence. — This neither staggers me in my sentiments or my duty. If a minority should refuse their assent to the new plan of a general government, and if they will have their own will, and without it, separate the union, let it be done;
Also tagged as: The Revolutionary War, Aristocracy, Articles of Confederation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, Interests, Large State, Legislative Branch, Monarchy, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Slavery, Small State, Suffrage, The People, The States, Virginia Plan
General Pinkney proposed that a Committee consisting of a member from each State should be appointed to devise & report some compromise. Mr: L. Martin had no objection to a Commitment, but no modifications whatever could reconcile the Smaller States to the least diminution of their equal Sovereignty. Mr. Sharman. We are now at a full stop, and nobody he supposed meant that we shd. break up without doing something. A Committee he thought most likely to hit on some expedient. Mr. Govr. Mo
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Check on Power, Democracy, Executive, Large State, Lifetime Appointment, Property, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Separation of Powers, Small State, State Executive, State Government, State Legislatures, Union, Demagogue, Nepotism, Oligarchy
Mr. Governr. Morris was opposed to a restriction of this right in either branch, considered merely in itself and as unconnected with the point of representation in the 2d. branch. It will disable the 2d. branch from proposing its own money plans, and giving the people an opportunity of judging by comparison of the merits of those proposed by the 1st. branch. Mr. Wilson could see nothing like a concession here on the part of the smaller States. If both branches were to say yes or no, it was of
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Congress, Democracy, Divided sovereignty, Excess of Democracy, Executive, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Lords, House of Representatives, Large State, National Treasury, Negative, Originating Money Bills, Parliament, Power of the Purse, Proportional Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Separation of Powers, Small State, The People, Veto
Mr. Gerry thought it would be proper to proceed to enumerate & define the powers to be vested in the Genl. Govt. before a question on the report should be taken as to the rule of representation in the 2d. branch. Mr. Madison, observed that it wd. be impossible to say what powers could be safely & properly vested in the Govt. before it was known, in what manner the States were to be represented in it. He was apprehensive that if a just representation were not the basis of the Govt. it would ha
Also tagged as: Anarchy, Articles of Confederation, Demagogue, Equal Representation, Faction, Large State, Mode of Representation, Originating Money Bills, Power of the Purse, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Small State, State Government, Suffrage, Union, Declaration of Independence, Diet, Germany, Interests, State Constitutions
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Randolph/Elsworth Census Proposal
Also tagged as: Census, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Property, Proportional Representation, Suffrage, Representation
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Second Proposal: Wilson's Reworking
Also tagged as: Census, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Property, Representation, Slavery, Suffrage, Taxation, The States
Report of the Special Committee [Working Version] - Randolph/Elsworth Census Proposal: Pinckney Removes Three-Fifths
Also tagged as: Equal Representation, Equality, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, Northern States, Property, Representation, Secession, Southern States, Suffrage, Taxation, The States
It was moved and seconded to strike out the words “in the manner and according to the ratio recommended by Congress in their recommendation of April 18. 1783" — and to substitute the following namely “of every description and condition” which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 2; noes — 8.]
Also tagged as: Census
On the question to agree to the clause, as amended, namely “Provided always that representation ought to be proptioned according to direct Taxation and in order to ascertain the alteration in the direct Taxation which may be required from time to time by the changes in the relative circumstances of the States, resolved that a Census be taken within six years from the first meeting of the Legislature of the United States and once within the term of every Ten years afterwards of all the inhabit
Mr. Dayton. The smaller States can never give up their equality. For himself he would in no event yield that security for their rights. Mr. Sherman urged the equality of votes not so much as a security for the small States; as for the State Govts. which could not be preserved unless they were represented & had a negative in the Genl. Government. He had no objection to the members in the 2d b. voting per capita, as had been suggested by Mr. Gerry. Mr. Madison concurred in the motion of Mr.
Also tagged as: Coercive power, Confederation, Constitutional Convention, Equal Representation, Equitable Ratio of Representation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, General Government, House of Representatives, Judicial Branch, Large State, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Mode of Representation, National Government, National Legislature, Proportional Representation, Quotas of Contribution, Representation, Small State, Southern States, The Confederation
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Sixth Resolution (Working Version): First Clause
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Legislative Authority, Legislative Power, National Legislature
It was moved and seconded to agree to the first clause of the sixth resolution reported from the Committee of the whole House namely “That the national Legislature ought to possess the legislative rights vested in Congress by the confederation” which passed unanimously in the affirmative.
The motion made by Mr. Madison July 18. & then postponed, “that the Judges shd. be nominated by the Executive & such nominations become appointments unless disagreed to by two-thirds of the 2d. branch of the Legislature,” was now resumed. Mr. Madison stated as his reasons for the motion. 1 that it secured the responsibility of the Executive who would in general be more capable & likely to select fit characters than the Legislature, or even the 2d. b. of it, who might hide their selfish motive
Also tagged as: Executive Authority, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Massachusetts, Mode of Appointment, Mode of Representation, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Negative, Northern States, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Separation of Powers, Southern States, State Legislature, State Legislatures, Supreme Court, The People, The States, Veto
Col. Mason considered a reference of the plan to the authority of the people as one of the most important and essential of the Resolutions. The Legislatures have no power to ratify it. They are the mere creatures of the State Constitutions, and cannot be greater than their creators. And he knew of no power in any of the Constitutions, he knew there was no power in some of them, that could be competent to this object. Whither then must we resort? To the people with whom all power remains that has
Also tagged as: Amendment, Articles of Confederation, Confederation, Constitutional Convention, Debt, Demagogue, Eastern States, Legislative Authority, National Government, National Supremacy, Ratification, State Constitutions, State Legislature, State Legislatures, The People, Union
On the question to agree to the 19th resolution as reported from the Committee of the whole House, namely "Resolved that the amendments which shall be offered to the confederation by the Convention ought at a proper time or times after the approbation of Congress to be submitted to an assembly or assemblies of representatives, recommended by the several Legislatures, to be expressly chosen by the People to consider and decide thereon" it passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 9; noes — 1.]
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Third Article
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Congress, House of Representatives, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Senate, Negative
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article IV: Section 6
Also tagged as: Age, Citizenship, Congress, Delaware, Electors, First Branch of National Legislature, Georgia, House of Representatives, Impeachment, Massachusetts, Mode of Election, Mode of Representation, National Legislature, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Preamble, Proportional Representation, Representation, Representatives, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Supreme Executive, Supreme Judiciary, Supreme Legislative, Taxation, The People, The States, Union, Virginia, We the People, Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, United States
Mr. Elseworth. was opposed to the motion as discouraging meritorious aliens from emigrating to this Country. Mr. Pinkney. As the Senate is to have the power of making treaties & managing our foreign affairs, there is peculiar danger and impropriety in opening its door to those who have foreign attachments. He quoted the jealousy of the Athenians on this subject who made it death for any stranger to intrude his voice into their legislative proceedings. Col. Mason highly approved of the poli
Mr. King remarked that the section authorized the 2 Houses to adjourn to a new place. He thought this inconvenient. The mutability of place had dishonored the federal Govt. and would require as strong a cure as we could devise. He thought a law at least should be made necessary to a removal of the Seat of Govt. Mr Madison viewed the subject in the same light, and joined with Mr. King in a motion requiring a law. Mr. Governr. Morris proposed the additional alteration by inserting the words
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Executive, Executive Branch, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Seat of Government, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 8 - Proposal for a Law to Fix the Seat of Congress
Also tagged as: Adjournment, Bicameral Legislature, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Seat of Government
Mr. Govr Morris. remarked that if the members were to be paid by the States it would throw an unequal burden on the distant States, which would be unjust as the Legislature was to be a national Assembly. He moved that the payment be out of the Natl. Treasury; leaving the quantum to the discretion of the Natl. Legislature. There could be no reason to fear that they would overpay themselves. Mr. Butler contended for payment by the States; particularly in the case of the Senate, who will be so l
Also tagged as: Compensation, Divided sovereignty, First Branch of National Legislature, General Government, House of Representatives, National Legislature, National Treasury, Seat of Government, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, State Government
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 10 - Elsworth for Five Dollars
Also tagged as: Compensation, National Legislature, National Treasury
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendment to the 10 sect. of the 6 article “five dollars or the present value thereof per diem during their attendance & for every thirty miles travel in going to and returning from Congress” which passed in the negative [Ayes — 2; noes — 9.]
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 11
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Senate
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 12
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 12 - Last Clause Struck Out
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 12 - Strong's Amendment
Also tagged as: Congress, House of Representatives, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Money Bills, Revenue, Salary, Senate
Col. Mason...was extremely earnest to take this power from the Senate, who he said could already sell the whole Country by means of Treaties. Mr Ghorum urged the amendment as of great importance. The Senate will first acquire the habit of preparing money bills, and then the practice will grow into an exclusive right of preparing them. Mr. Gouvernr. Morris opposed it as unnecessary and inconvenient.
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Money Bills, Revenue, Senate, Treaties, Treaty
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Madison's Amendment
Also tagged as: Congress, Judicial Branch, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Supreme Court, Veto
Mr. Pinkney opposed the interference of the Judges in the Legislative business: it will involve them in parties, and give a previous tincture to their opinions. Mr. Mercer heartily approved the motion. It as an axiom that the Judiciary ought to be separate from the Legislative: but equally so that it ought to be independent of that department. The true policy of the axiom is that legislative usurpation and oppression may be obviated. He disapproved of the Doctrine that the Judges as expositor
Also tagged as: Congress, Judicial Authority, Judicial Branch, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Supreme Court, Veto
Mr. Govr. Morris regretted that something like the proposed check could not be agreed to. He dwelt on the importance of public Credit, and the difficulty of supporting it without some strong barrier against the instability of legislative Assemblies. He suggested the idea of requiring three fourths of each house to repeal laws where the President should not concur. He had no great reliance on the revisionary power as the Executive was now to be constituted (elected by the Congress). The legislatu
Also tagged as: Credit, Executive, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Legislative Branch, National Judiciary, National Legislature, President, Veto, War
Mr Sherman had no objection to the proviso here, other than it would derange the parts of the report as made by the Committee, to take them in such an order. Mr. Rutlidge. It being of no consequence in what order points are decided, he should vote for the clause as it stood, but on condition that the subsequent part relating to negroes should also be agreed to. Mr. Governeur Morris considered such a proviso as inadmissible any where. It was so radically objectionable, that it might cost th
Also tagged as: Congress, Divided sovereignty, Exports, Impost, National Legislature, Northern States, Slavery, Southern States, Taxation, Trade
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - First Clause (Taxes, Duties, Imposts)
Also tagged as: Congress, Impost, National Legislature, Taxation, Legislative Power
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Second Clause (Regulating Commerce)
Also tagged as: Commerce, Congress, Impost, National Legislature, Taxation, Legislative Power
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Third Clause (Naturalization)
Also tagged as: Congress, Immigration, National Legislature, Naturalization, Legislative Power
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Fourth Clause (Coining Money)
Also tagged as: Congress, National Legislature, National Mint, Legislative Power
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Fifth Clause (Regulating Foreign Coin)
Also tagged as: Congress, Foreign Currency, National Legislature, Legislative Power
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Sixth Clause (Weights and Measures)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Weights and Measures
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Seventh Clause (Post Offices)
Also tagged as: Congress, National Legislature, National Post, Legislative Power
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Seventh Clause (Post Offices): Gerry to Add Post Roads
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Post
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Eighth Clause (To Borrow Money)
Also tagged as: Congress, Credit, Debt, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Eighth Clause (To Borrow Money): Morris to Strike Out "Emit Bills"
Also tagged as: Congress, Credit, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Mr. Govr Morris. If the United States had credit such bills would be unnecessary: if they had not unjust & useless. Mr. Madison, will it not be sufficient to prohibit the making them a tender? This will remove the temptation to emit them with unjust views. And promissory notes in that shape may in some emergencies be best. Mr. Govr. Morris. striking out the words will leave room still for notes of a responsible minister which will do all the good without the mischief. The Monied interest w
Also tagged as: Congress, Credit, Finance, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Paper Money
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Ninth Clause (Appointment of Treasurer)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Treasury
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Ninth Clause (Appointment of Treasurer): Gorham for a Joint Ballot
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Congress, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Treasury
Mr Ghorum moved to insert “joint” before ballot, as more convenient as well as reasonable, than to require the separate concurrence of the Senate. ... Mr Sherman opposed it as favoring the larger States.
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Congress, Large State, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Treasury, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Motion to strike out the ninth clause.
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive Appointment, Executive Power, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Treasury, State Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Tenth Clause (Inferior Tribunals)
Also tagged as: Congress, Inferior Tribunals, Legislative Power, Lower Courts, National Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Eleventh Clause (Captures)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Appointment, National Legislature, Piracy, War
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Twelfth Clause (Piracies and Felonies)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Piracy, Power of War
Mr. Mason doubts the safety of it, considering the strict rule of construction in criminal cases. He doubted also the propriety of taking the power in all these cases wholly from the States. Mr Governr Morris thought it would be necessary to extend the authority farther, so as to provide for the punishment of counterfeiting in general. Bills of exchange for example might be forged in one State and carried into another: It was suggested by some other member that foreign paper might be count
Also tagged as: Congress, Counterfeiting, Crime, Legislative Power, National Legislature, State Jurisdiction
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Twelfth Clause (Piracies and Felonies) - Madison/Randolph to Insert "Define And"
Also tagged as: Congress, Crime, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Piracy
Mr. Wilson thought “felonies” sufficiently defined by Common law. Mr. Dickenson concurred with Mr Wilson Mr Mercer was in favor of the amendment. Mr Madison. felony at common law is vague. It is also defective. One defect is supplied by Stat: of Anne as to running away with vessels which at common law was a breach of trust only. Besides no foreign law should be a standard farther than is expressly adopted — If the laws of the States were to prevail on this subject, the citizens of diffe
Also tagged as: Common Law, Congress, Crime, Legislative Power, National Jurisdiction, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Piracy, State Jurisdiction
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Twelfth Clause (Piracies and Felonies) - Elsworth's Amendment
Also tagged as: Congress, Counterfeiting, Crime, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Mint
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Thirteenth Clause (Rebellion)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Rebellion, State Legislatures
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Thirteenth Clause (Rebellion) - Pinckney to Strike "Application of Legislature"
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Rebellion, State Legislature
Mr L- Martin opposed it as giving a dangerous & unnecessary power. The consent of the State ought to precede the introduction of any extraneous force whatever. Mr. Mercer supported the opposition of Mr. Martin.
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Necessary and Proper, Rebellion, State Legislatures
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Thirteenth Clause (Rebellion) - Elsworth to Add "Or Executive"
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Rebellion, State Executive, State Legislatures
Mr Govr Morris. The Executive may possibly be at the head of the Rebellion. The Genl Govt. should enforce obedience in all cases where it may be necessary. Mr. Ellsworth. In many cases The Genl. Govt. ought not to be able to interpose unless called upon.
Also tagged as: Congress, General Government, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Necessary and Proper, Rebellion, State Executive, State Legislatures
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Thirteenth Clause (Rebellion) - Elsworth Varies His Motion
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Rebellion, State Legislatures
Mr. Gerry was agst. letting loose the myrmidons of the U. States on a State without its own consent. The States will be the best Judges in such cases. More blood would have been spilt in Massts in the late insurrection, if the Genl. authority had intermeddled. Mr. Langdon was for striking out as moved by Mr. Pinkney. The apprehension of the national force, will have a salutary effect in preventing insurrections. Mr Randolph- If the Natl. Legislature is to judge whether the State legislatur
Also tagged as: Congress, Domestic Tranquility, General Government, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Rebellion, State Jurisdiction, State Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Thirteenth Clause (Rebellion): Madison/Dickinson to Insert "Against the Government Thereof"
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Rebellion
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Thirteenth Clause (Minimal Version)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Rebellion
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Fourteenth Clause (War)
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War
Mr Pinkney opposed the vesting this power in the Legislature. Its proceedings were too slow. It wd. meet but once a year. The Hs. of Reps. would be too numerous for such deliberations. The Senate would be the best depositary, being more acquainted with foreign affairs, and most capable of proper resolutions. If the States are equally represented in Senate, so as to give no advantage to large States, the power will notwithstanding be safe, as the small have their all at stake in such cases as wel
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive, Executive Power, First Branch of National Legislature, Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr. Madison and Mr Gerry moved to insert “declare,” striking out “make” war; leaving to the Executive the power to repel sudden attacks. Mr Sharman thought it stood very well. The Executive shd. be able to repel and not to commence war. “Make” better than “declare” the latter narrowing the power too much. Mr Gerry never expected to hear in a republic a motion to empower the Executive alone to declare war. Mr. Elseworth. there is a material difference between the cases of making war, and
Also tagged as: Congress, Diplomacy, Executive, Executive Power, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Fourteenth Clause (War): Butler for "Make Peace"
Also tagged as: Congress, Diplomacy, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Peace, Power of War
Proposed Powers of the Legislature of the United States
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Proposed Powers of the Legislature of the United States - Mason to Regulate the Militia
Also tagged as: Common Defense, Congress, General Government, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, Peace, Standing Army
Proposed Powers of the Legislature of the United States - Gerry on Securities and Letters of Marque
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Letter of Marque, National Legislature, Power of War, Privateering
Mr. Mason moved to enable Congress “to enact sumptuary laws.” No Government can be maintained unless the manners be made consonant to it. Such a discretionary power may do good and can do no harm. A proper regulation of excises & of trade may do a great deal but it is best to have an express provision. It was objected to sumptuary laws that they were contrary to nature. This was a vulgar error. The love of distinction it is true is natural; but the object of sumptuary laws is not to extinguish t
Mr. Ghorum, thought it wrong to insert this in the Constitution. The Legislature will no doubt do what is right. The present Congress have such a power and are now exercising it. Mr Sherman unless some rule be expressly given none will exist under the new system. Mr. Elseworth. Though The contracts of Congress will be binding, there will be no rule for executing them on the States; — and one ought to be provided.
Also tagged as: Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Mr. Langdon. by this section the States are left at liberty to tax exports. N. H. therefore with other non-exporting States, will be subject to be taxed by the States exporting its produce. This could not be admitted. It seems to be feared that the Northern States will oppress the trade of the Southn. This may be guarded agst by requiring the concurrence of two-thirds or three-fourths of the legislature in such cases. Mr Elseworth— It is best as it stands— The power of regulating trade betwee
Also tagged as: Exports, Immigration, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, New Jersey, North Carolina, Northern States, Pennsylvania, Power of War, Revenue, Southern States, Taxation, Trade, War Powers
Mr L— Martin, proposed to vary the sect: 4. art VII so as to allow a prohibition or tax on the importation of slaves. 1. As five slaves are to be counted as 3 free men in the apportionment of Representatives; such a clause wd. leave an encouragement to this trafic. 2 slaves weakened one part of the Union which the other parts were bound to protect: the privilege of importing them was therefore unreasonable — 3. it was inconsistent with the principles of the revolution and dishonorable to the Ame
Also tagged as: Immigration, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Maryland, National Legislature, Northern States, Revenue, Slavery, South Carolina, Southern States, Taxation, Trade, Virginia
Art. VII sect 4. resumed. Mr. Sherman was for leaving the clause as it stands. He disapproved of the slave trade: yet as the States were now possessed of the right to import slaves, as the public good did not require it to be taken from them, & as it was expedient to have as few objections as possible to the proposed scheme of Government, he thought it best to leave the matter as we find it. He observed that the abolition of slavery seemed to be going on in the U. S. & that the good sense of the
Also tagged as: Congress, Cromwell, General Government, Greece, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Northern States, Quakers, Rome, Slavery, Southern States, State power, Taxation, Trade, Union, Western States
Clauses for the Grand Committee on Taxation - Sixth Section
Also tagged as: Bicameral Legislature, Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Navigation Act
Mr. Gorham did not see the propriety of it. Is it meant to require a greater proportion of votes? He desired it to be remembered that the Eastern States had no motive to Union but a commercial one. They were able to protect themselves. They were not afraid of external danger, and did not need the aid of the Southn. States. Mr. Wilson wished for a commitment in order to reduce the proportion of votes required. Mr. Elsworth was for taking the plan as it is. This widening of opinions has a th
Also tagged as: Commerce, Congress, Eastern States, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Navigation Act, Southern States, Union
Report of the Committee of Detail on Legislative Powers
Also tagged as: Advice and Consent, Congress, Debt, Executive, Executive Council, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Impeachment, Indians, National Judiciary, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Qualifications for Office, Revenue, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Supreme Court, Union
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Ban on Ex Post Facto Laws
Also tagged as: Bill of Attainder, Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Mr. Gerry urged the necessity of this prohibition, which he said was greater in the National than the State Legislature, because the number of members in the former being fewer, they were on that account the more to be feared. Mr. Govr. Morris thought the precaution as to ex post facto laws unnecessary; but essential as to bills of attainder Mr Elseworth contended that there was no lawyer, no civilian who would not say that ex post facto laws were void of themselves. It cannot then be nece
Also tagged as: Bill of Attainder, Congress, Ex Post Facto Law, Legislative Power, National Legislature, State Legislatures
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Ban on Ex Post Facto Laws - First Part
Also tagged as: Bill of Attainder, Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Ban on Ex Post Facto Laws - Second Clause
Also tagged as: Congress, Ex Post Facto Law, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Mr Carrol remarked that experience overruled all other calculations. It had proved that in whatever light they might be viewed by civilians or others, the State Legislatures had passed them, and they had taken effect. Mr. Wilson. If these prohibitions in the State Constitutions have no effect, it will be useless to insert them in this Constitution. Besides, both sides will agree to the principle & will differ as to its application. Mr. Williamson. Such a prohibitory clause is in the Consti
Also tagged as: Congress, Ex Post Facto Law, Legislative Power, National Legislature, State Constitutions, State Legislatures
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - First Clause
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Mr. Elsworth argued that they were unnecessary. The U— S— heretofore entered into Engagements by Congs who were their Agents. They will hereafter be bound to fulfil them by their new agents. Mr Randolph thought such a provision necessary; for though the U. States will be bound, the new Govt will have no authority in the case unless it be given to them. Mr. Madison thought it necessary to give the authority in order to prevent misconstruction. He mentioned the attempts made by the Debtors t
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Congress, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - First Clause: Morris's Amendment
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Congress, Debt, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - First Clause: Morris's Amendment - To Insert "Liquidate the Claims"
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Congress, Debt, Legislative Power, National Legislature
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, National Supremacy, State Jurisdiction
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause: To Strike Out "Training the Militia"
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, National Supremacy
Motion to strike out the last member of the second clause.
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature
Mr Gerry, This power in the U— S. as explained is making the States drill-sergeants. He had as lief let the Citizens of Massachusetts be disarmed, as to take the command from the States, and subject them to the Genl Legislature. It would be regarded as a system of Despotism. Mr Madison observed that “arming” as explained did not did not extend to furnishing arms; nor the term “disciplining” to penalties & Courts martial for enforcing them. Mr. King added, to his former explanation that arm
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, National Supremacy, National Treasury, Right to Bear Arms, State Government, States' Rights, Tyranny
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause: Dayton's Substitution
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, National Supremacy, States' Rights
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause: Elsworth and Sherman's Substitution
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, National Supremacy
The object of this proposition was to refer the plan for the Militia to the General Govt. but leave the execution of it to the State Govts. Mr Langdon said He could not understand the jealousy expressed by some Gentleman. The General & State Govts. were not enemies to each other, but different institutions for the good of the people of America. As one of the people he could say, the National Govt. is mine, the State Govt is mine — In transferring power from one to the other — I only take out
Also tagged as: Congress, General Government, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, National Supremacy, State Government, State Legislatures
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause: First Part
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause: Second Part
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, States' Rights
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause: Second Part - Madison's Amendment
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, States' Rights
Mr. Sherman considered this as absolutely inadmissible. He said that if the people should be so far asleep as to allow the Most influential officers of the Militia to be appointed by the Genl. Government, every man of discernment would rouse them by sounding the alarm to them — Mr. Gerry. Let us at once destroy the State Govts have an Executive for life or hereditary, and a proper Senate, and then there would be some consistency in giving full powers to the Genl Govt. but as the States are no
Also tagged as: Congress, Constitutional Convention, General Government, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, State Government, States' Rights
Report of the Grand Committee on Debt [Resolutions] - Second Clause: Final Part
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Power, Military, Militia, National Legislature, National Supremacy
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Pinckney on Bribes from Foreign States
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Congress, Foreign Affairs, National Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VIII
Also tagged as: Congress, National Legislature, National Supremacy, State Constitutions, State Government, State Jurisdiction, Treaties
Mr Govr Morris argued agst. the appointment of officers by the Senate. He considered the body as too numerous for the purpose; as subject to cabal; and as devoid of responsibility. — If Judges were to be tried by the Senate according to a late report of a Committee it was particularly wrong to let the Senate have the filling of vacancies which its own decrees were to create. Mr. Wilson was of the same opinion & for like reasons.
Also tagged as: Congress, Corruption, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Power, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Separation of Powers
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Eighteenth Clause: Morris to Strike Out "Enforce Treaties"
Also tagged as: Common Defense, Congress, Laws, Legislative Power, Militia, National Legislature, Rebellion, Union
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Eighteenth Clause: Morris Reworks First Part
Also tagged as: Common Defense, Congress, Laws, Legislative Power, Militia, National Legislature, Rebellion, Union
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Pinckney Proposes an Additional Power
Also tagged as: Congress, Legislative Authority, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Negative, Union, Veto
Mr C— Pinkney. This principle he observed had formerly been agreed to. He considered the precaution as essentially necessary: The objection drawn from the predominance of the large States had been removed by the equality established in the Senate. Mr. Sherman thought it unnecessary; the laws of the General Government being Supreme & paramount to the State laws according to the plan, as it now stands. Mr. Madison proposed that it should be committed— He had been from the beginning a friend
Also tagged as: Congress, Equal Representation, Equitable Ratio of Representation, General Government, Large State, Legislative Power, National Legislature, National Supremacy, Negative, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, State Executive, State Government, State Jurisdiction, State Legislature, Union
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - Power Over Debts and Taxes
Also tagged as: Congress, Debt, Impost, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Taxation
Mr. Butler expressed his dissatisfaction lest it should compel payment as well to the Blood-suckers who had speculated on the distresses of others, as to those who had fought & bled for their country. He would be ready he said tomorrow to vote for a discrimination between those classes of people, and gave notice that he should move for a reconsideration.
Also tagged as: Congress, Debt, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Taxation
Mr. Madison hinted for consideration, whether a distinction might not be made between different sorts of Treaties — Allowing the President & Senate to make Treaties eventual and of Alliance for limited terms — and requiring the concurrence of the whole Legislature in other Treaties.
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive, Executive Power, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr. Butler...dwelt on the division of opinion concerning the domestic debts, and the different pretensions of the different classes of holders. ... Mr. Randolph wished for a reconsideration in order to better the expression, and to provide for the case of the State debts as is done by Congress.
Also tagged as: Debt
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VII: Section 1 - First Clause (Randolph's Amendment)
Mr. Pinkney...remarked that there were five distinct commercial interests— 1. the fisheries & W. India trade, which belonged to the N. England States. 2. the interest of N. York lay in a free trade. 3. Wheat & flour the Staples of the two Middle States, (N. J. & Penna.)— 4 Tobo. the staple of Maryd. & Virginia & partly of N. Carolina. 5. Rice & Indigo, the staples of S. Carolina & Georgia. These different interests would be a source of oppressive regulations if no check to a bare majority should
Art: XVII — before the House, as amended. Mr. Sherman was against it. He thought it unnecessary. The Union cannot dismember a State without its consent. Mr Langdon thought there was great weight in the argument of Mr. Luther Martin, and that the proposition substituted by Mr. Govr. Morris would excite a dangerous opposition to the plan. Mr. Govr Morris thought on the contrary that the small States would be pleased with the regulation, as it holds up the idea of dismembering the large St
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXI: Randolph for Nine States
Mr. Dickinson asked whether the concurrence of Congress is to be essential to the establishment of the system, whether the refusing States in the Confederacy could be deserted — and whether Congress could concur in contravening the system under which they acted? Mr. Madison. remarked that if the blank should be filled with “seven” eight, or “nine” — the Constitution as it stands might be put in force over the whole body of the people. tho’ less than a majority of them should ratify it. Mr.
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXII: Morris and Pinckney's Amendment
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendment to the 22nd article “This Constitution shall be laid before the United States in Congress assembled — and it is the opinion of this Convention that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention chosen in each State in order to receive the ratification of such Convention: to which end the several Legislatures ought to provide for the calling Conventions within their respective States as speedily as circumstances will permit.”
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXIII: First Part
It was moved and seconded to agree to the 23rd article as far as the words “assigned by Congress” inclusive which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes "nem. con.".
Mr. Wilson objected to the mode of appointing, as blending a branch of the Legislature with the Executive. Good laws are of no effect without a good Executive; and there can be no good Executive without a responsible appointment of officers to execute. Responsibility is in a manner destroyed by such an agency of the Senate — He would prefer the Council proposed by Col: Mason, provided its advice should not be made obligatory on the President Mr. Pinkney was against joining the Senate in these
Mr Wilson thought it objectionable to require the concurrence of ⅔ which puts it in the power of a minority to controul the will of a majority. Mr. King concurred in the objection; remarking that as the Executive was here joined in the business, there was a check which did not exist in Congress where The concurrence of ⅔ was required.
Mr. Wilson wished the requisition of two thirds to be struck out altogether If the majority cannot be trusted, it was a proof, as observed by Mr. Ghorum, that we were not fit for one Society. A reconsideration of the whole clause was agreed to. Mr. Govr. Morris was agst. striking out the “exception of Treaties of peace” If two thirds of the Senate should be required for peace, the Legislature will be unwilling to make war for that reason, on account of the Fisheries or the Mississippi, the
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 2 - McHenry's Amendment on Convening Congress
Mr. Gerry moved to reconsider art: XXI & XXII from the latter of which “for the approbation of Congs.” had been struck out. He objected to proceeding to change the Government without the approbation of Congress as being improper and giving just umbrage to that body. He repeated his objections also to an annulment of the confederation with so little scruple or formality. Mr. Hamilton concurred with Mr. Gerry as to the indecorum of not requiring the approbation of Congress. He considered this a
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXI: Hamilton's Substitution
Mr. Wilson. This motion being seconded, it is necessary now to speak freely He expressed in strong terms his disapprobation of the expedient proposed, particularly the suspending the plan of the Convention on the approbation of Congress. He declared it to be worse than folly to rely on the concurrence of the Rhode Island members of Congs. in the plan. Maryland had voted on this floor; for requiring the unanimous assent of the 13 States to the proposed change in the federal System. N— York has no
Pinckney's Proposal for an Address to the People
It was moved and seconded to refer the following to the Committee of revision. “That it be an instruction to the Committee to prepare an address to the People to accompany the present constitution, and to be laid with the same before the United States in Congress. which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes, "The motion itself was referred to the Committee. nem: con:."
Pinckney's Proposal for an Address to the People
The draught of a letter to Congress being at the same time reported — was read once throughout, and afterwards agreed to by paragraphs. Editors' note: Since there does not appear to be a record of this debate and the several accompanying votes, one vote will be used to represent agreement to the letter.
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XIII: Mason Renews His Amendment
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendment to the 13th article Provided that no State shall be restrained from imposing the usual Duties on produce exported from such State, for the sole purpose of defraying the charges of inspecting, packing, storing, and indemnifying the losses on such produce, while in the custody of public Officers: but all such regulations shall, in case of abuse, be subject to the revision and controul of Congress. which passed in the affirmative.
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 4 - "Except As To the Places of Choosing Senators"
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 8 - Rutledge to Strike Out Appointment of Treasurer
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 8 - Madison/Pinckney for University without Religious Qualifications
Mr Madison was in favor of it. It did not restrain Congress from establishing a military force in time of peace if found necessary; and as armies in time of peace are allowed on all hands to be an evil, it is well to discountenance them by the Constitution, as far as will consist with the essential power of the Govt. on that head. Mr Govr. Morris opposed the motion as setting a dishonorable mark of distinction on the military class of Citizens Mr Pinkney & Mr. Bedford concurred in the oppo
Mr. Sherman— It is unnecessary— The power of Congress does not extend to the Press.
Mr Gerry entered into observations inculcating the importance of public faith, and the propriety of the restraint put on the States from impairing the obligation of contracts — Alledging that Congress ought to be laid under the like prohibitions. he made a motion to that effect. He was not 2ded.
Mr Rutledge objected on account of the delay it would produce and the impropriety of addressing the people before it was known whether Congress would approve and support the plan— Congress, if an address be thought proper can prepare as good a one— The members of the Convention can also explain the reasons of what has been done to their respective Constituents. Mr Sherman concurred in the opinion that an address was both unnecessary and improper.
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 10 - Duties and Imposts for US Treasury
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 10 - Duties and Imposts for US Treasury: Motion to Strike Out Last Part
On a motion to strike out the last part “and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and controul of the Congress” it passed in the Negative. N. H. no. Mas. no. Ct no— N. J. no. Pa divd. Del. no. Md. no Va ay— N— C— ay. S. C. no Geo. ay. [Ayes — 3; noes — 7; divided — 1.]
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 10 - No State Restrained from Duties of Tonnage
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 10 - No Duties of Tonnage without Consent of Congress
On motion “that no State shall lay any duty on tonnage without the Consent of Congress” N. H— ay— Mas. ay. Ct. divd. N. J. ay. Pa. no. Del. ay. Md. ay. Va. no. N— C. no. S— C. ay. Geo. no. [Ayes — 6; noes — 4; divided — 1.]
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 10 - Restrictions Remoulded
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 2 - Second Clause: Morris/Sherman's Amendment
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 4: Section 3 - Gerry's Amendment
Art— V. “The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem necessary, or on the application of two thirds of the Legislatures of the several States shall propose amendments to this Constitution, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part thereof, when the same shall have been ratified by three fourths at least of the Legislatures of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress:
Mr Madison did not see why Congress would not be as much bound to propose amendments applied for by two thirds of the States as to call a call a Convention on the like application. He saw no objection however against providing for a Convention for the purpose of amendments, except only that difficulties might arise as to the form, the quorum &c. which in Constitutional regulations ought to be as much as possible avoided.
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 5: Mason on Navigation Acts
Report of the Committee of Style - Article VII: Randolph for Amendments by State Conventions
Mr. Pinkney. These declarations from members so respectable at the close of this important scene, give a peculiar solemnity to the present moment. He descanted on the consequences of calling forth the deliberations & amendments of the different States on the subject of Government at large. Nothing but confusion & contrariety could spring from the experiment. The States will never agree in their plans— And the Deputies to a second Convention coming together under the discordant impressions of the
There is no Declaration of Rights, and the laws of the general government being paramount to the laws and constitution of the several States, the Declaration of Rights in the separate States are no security. Nor are the people secured even in the enjoyment of the benefit of the common law. In the House of Representatives there is not the substance but the shadow only of representation; which can never produce proper information in the legislature, or inspire confidence in the people; the laws
Docr. Franklin rose with a speech in his hand, which he had reduced to writing for his own conveniency, and which Mr. Wilson read in the words following. Mr. President I confess that there are several parts of this constitution which I do not at present approve, but I am not sure I shall never approve them: For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged by better information or fuller consideration, to change opinions even on important subjects, which I once thou
Constitution of the United States - Gorham's Motion for One Representative per Thirty Thousand
Mr Randolph then rose and with an allusion to the observations of Docr Franklin, apologized for his refusing to sign the Constitution, notwithstanding the vast majority & venerable names that would give sanction to its wisdom and its worth. He said however that he did not mean by this refusal to decide that he should oppose the Constitution without doors. He meant only to keep himself free to be governed by his duty as it should be prescribed by his future judgment — He refused to sign, because
Resolution that the President retain the Journal.
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: From Massachusetts.
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: From Massachusetts..
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: From Massachusetts..
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: From Massachusetts..
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Connec
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Conn
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Connec
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Penns
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Penns
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Penn
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Pennsy
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From Virgi
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'Congress of the United States, begun and held at the city of New York, on Wednesday, the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, pursuant to a resolution of the late Congress, made in conformity to the resolutions of the Federal Convention of the 17th September, 1787: being the first session of the Congress held under the Constitution aforesaid. On which day, the following members of the House of Representatives appeared and took their seats, to wit: [...] From South
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Thousand, House, United, Congress, Representatives, Hundred, Following, States, Constitution, Number, Fourth, First
'But a quorum of the whole number not being present, the House adjourned until to-morrow morning eleven o'clock.' [Editor's note: Beginning on 4 March 1789, members began to arrive at the First Congress. The assembled members met daily (barring Sundays) to ascertain whether enough delegates from enough states had arrived to form a quorum. If not, they adjourned. Though the delegates met almost daily from 4 March to 1 April before becoming quorate, only those days where new members arrived are
Also tagged as: Assembled, House, Congress, States, Number, First
Motion to Appoint a Rules Committee
Also tagged as: Rights, House, Rules
Motion to Appoint a Doorkeeper and Assistant Doorkeeper
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Rights, Others, Rules, Place, First, Service
'On motion, 'Resolved, That a doorkeeper and an assistant doorkeeper be appointed for the service of this House' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess. 2 April 1789). *** 'Resolved, That a door keeper and assistant doorkeeper be appointed for the service of this House' (Annals of Congress, 1st. Cong., 1st sess., 101).
Also tagged as: Congress, House, Service
Motion to Elect a Doorkeeper
Also tagged as: Senate, Congress
'James Mathews was elected door-keeper' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: Congress
'James Mathews was elected door-keeper' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: Congress
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
Motion to Appoint a Rules Committee
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'Messrs. ELLSWORTH, LEE, STRONG, MACLAY, and BASSETT, were appointed a committee to prepare rules for the government of the two Houses in cases of conference, and to take under consideration the manner of electing chaplains, and to confer thereupon with a committee of the House of Representatives. The same committee were also to prepare rules for conducting the business of the Senate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18).
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Government, Representatives, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: House, State, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: House, State, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: House, State, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
'On motion, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 106).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Resolved
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: Congress
'On motion of Mr. LEE, the committee rose and reported progress...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 120).
Also tagged as: Congress
'Several other members, viz: William Floyd, from New York, Thomas Sinnickson, from New Jersey, Joshua Seney, from Maryland, and Edanus Burke, Daniel Huger, and William Smith, from South Carolina, appeared to take their seats' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 13 April 1789). [Editor's note: As stated in both the House Journal and the Annals, Floyd arrived in Congress on 13 April 1789. However, as the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day, he is here represented as joining t
Also tagged as: Following, Take, House, First, Congress
'Several other members, viz: William Floyd, from New York, Thomas Sinnickson, from New Jersey, Joshua Seney, from Maryland, and Edanus Burke, Daniel Huger, and William Smith, from South Carolina, appeared to take their seats' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 13 April 1789). [Editor's note: As stated in both the House Journal and the Annals, Sinnickson arrived in Congress on 13 April 1789. However, as the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day, he is here represented as join
Also tagged as: Congress, Take, Following, First, House
'Several other members, viz: William Floyd, from New York, Thomas Sinnickson, from New Jersey, Joshua Seney, from Maryland, and Edanus Burke, Daniel Huger, and William Smith, from South Carolina, appeared to take their seats' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 13 April 1789). [Editor's note: As stated in both the House Journal and the Annals, Seney arrived in Congress on 13 April 1789. However, as the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day, he is here represented as joining t
Also tagged as: Following, Take, House, First, Congress
'Several other members, viz: William Floyd, from New York, Thomas Sinnickson, from New Jersey, Joshua Seney, from Maryland, and Edanus Burke, Daniel Huger, and William Smith, from South Carolina, appeared to take their seats' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 13 April 1789). [Editor's note: As stated in both the House Journal and the Annals, Burke arrived in Congress on 13 April 1789. However, as the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day, he is here represented as joining t
Also tagged as: Following, Take, House, First, Congress
'Several other members, viz: William Floyd, from New York, Thomas Sinnickson, from New Jersey, Joshua Seney, from Maryland, and Edanus Burke, Daniel Huger, and William Smith, from South Carolina, appeared to take their seats' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 13 April 1789). [Editor's note: As stated in both the House Journal and the Annals, Huger arrived in Congress on 13 April 1789. However, as the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day, he is here represented as joining t
Also tagged as: Following, Take, House, First, Congress
'Several other members, viz: William Floyd, from New York, Thomas Sinnickson, from New Jersey, Joshua Seney, from Maryland, and Edanus Burke, Daniel Huger, and William Smith, from South Carolina, appeared to take their seats' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 13 April 1789). [Editor's note: As stated in both the House Journal and the Annals, Smith arrived in Congress on 13 April 1789. However, as the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day, he is here represented as joining t
Also tagged as: Following, Take, House, First, Congress
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: Congress
'On motion of Mr. BLAND, the committee rose and reported progress' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 148).
Also tagged as: Congress
Conference Rules Committee Report
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, Resolved, State, Case, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases, Services, Amendment, Time
'The committee appointed the 7th of April, to prepare a system of rules to govern the two Houses in cases of conference, to take into consideration the manner electing chaplains, and to confer thereon with a committee of the House of Representatives, reported: That they had conferred on the business with a Committee of the House of Representatives for that purpose appointed. Whereupon, Resolved, That, in every case of an amendment to a bill agreed to in one House and dissented to in the other
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, Resolved, State, Case, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases, Services, Amendment, Time
Letter from the Senate - 16 April
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, Taken, Papers, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases, Respecting
'On motion, Resolved, That so much of the standing rules and orders of this House as prescribes the enacted style of bills, be rescinded.' [Editor's note: A Committee on Conveying Documents between the House and Senate produced a report on this topic that, upon being read in the House session, was recommitted to its originating committee. The editors have not represented this committee in the timelines, because its actions at this point in the Congressional Session do not have a direct bea
Also tagged as: Rights, House, Senate, Rules, Resolved
'On motion, Resolved, That this House will, on Friday next, proceed by ballot to the appointment of a Chaplain to Congress, on the part of this House.'
Also tagged as: House, Part, Congress, Resolved
Implied Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
'This being the day on which the President of the United States was inaugurated no other business, of course, was attended to' (Annals of Congress, 1st. Cong., 1st sess., 241).
Also tagged as: Congress, United, States
'Another member, to wit: John Hathorn, from New York, appeared and took his seat' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 23 April 1789). [Editor's note: As both the House Journal and the Annals state, Hathorn arrived in Congress on 23 April 1789. However, the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day or the several days following. As a result, he is here represented as joining the Committee on its first meeting following his arrival.]
Also tagged as: Several, House, Following, Congress, State
'Another member, to wit: Jonathan Grout, from Massachusetts, appeared and took his seat' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 30 April 1789). [Editor's note: As both the House Journal and the Annals state, Grout arrived in Congress on 30 April 1789. However, the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day. As a result, he is here represented as joining the Committee of the Whole on its first meeting following his arrival.]
Also tagged as: State, House, Following, First, Congress
Implied Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Resolved, Rights, Following, Adopting
Motion to Elect a Chaplain
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Representatives, Part, Order, According
'The House accordingly resolved itself into a Committee of the whole, Mr. PAGE in the chair. And after adopting the following resolution, the committee rose...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 242).
Also tagged as: Following, House, Adopting, Congress, Resolved
'On motion of Mr. Sherman, the house proceeded to the order of the day, viz. The appointment of a Chaplain to the house of Representatives...' (New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 2 May 1789, 430). *** 'The House then, according to the order of the day, proceeded by ballot to the appointment Of a Chaplain to Congress on the part of this House; and upon examining the ballots, a majority of the votes of the whole House was found in favor of the Rev. William Linn' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Representatives, Part, Order, Favor, According
'On motion of Mr. Sherman, the house proceeded to the order of the day, viz. The appointment of a Chaplain to the house of Representatives and on calling up the ballots it appears that the Rev. Mr. Wm. Lynn, had 27 votes. Rev. Mr. Rogers, 19. Wherefore the Rev. Mr. Lynn was declared to be duly appointed, and the Clerk was directed to notify the Senate thereof' (New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 2 May 1789, 430). *** 'The House then, according to the order of the day, proceeded by
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, Part, Order, Favor, According
James Madison's Notice
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, First, Part, States, Subject, Make, Constitution, Necessary, Fourth, Amendments, Fifth, Time
Motion to Assign a Date for the Discussion of Amendments
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, House, Congress, Following, States, Informed, Order, Powers, Fact, Constitution, Exercise, Amendments
'Ordered that the 4th Monday in May be assigned for the consideration of the exercise of the powers vested in Congress by the 5th article of the constitution, relative to amendments' (New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 5 May 1789). *** 'Mr. MADISON gave notice, that on the fourth Monday of the present month, he should introduce the subject of amendments to the Constitution, agreeably to the fifth article of the Constitution: He thought it necessary thus early to mention the business, as it
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, States, Subject, Powers, Constitution, Exercise, Fourth, Amendments, Fifth, Time, Necessary
Virginia's Address to the Congress
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Representatives, Following, State, States, Constitution, People, Obtaining, Amendments, Time
Motion to Refer Virginia's Address
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Committed, State, Taken, States, Nature, Thirds, Number, Due, Fourth, Amendments, Time
'Mr. BLAND observed, that this application was made with a view of obtaining amendments to the constitution in one of the two modes pointed out in the 5th article; that copies of the application with an address had been sent to the several states, but that few of them seemed to have coincided with Virginia in opinion, and whether the apprehensions of the people of that state were well or ill founded, time alone would determine. He wished that the paper might be referred to a committee of the who
Also tagged as: Taken, States, Informed, Take, Best, Due, Place, United, Prescribed, State, Nature, Order, Obtaining, Exercise, House, Congress, Liberty, Constitution, According, Amendments, Time, People, Several, Committed, Subject, Thirds, Number
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: House, Congress
'[Bland] moved the adjournment, and the House agreed to it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 276).
Also tagged as: House, Congress
New York's Address to the Congress
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Representatives, State, States
Motion to File New York's Address
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Preserved, States, Amendments, Original
'Ordered, That the said application be entered on the Journal, and carefully preserved by the Clerk of this House, among the files in his office' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 6 May 1789; Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 282). *** 'Mr. Lawrence presented the application of the Legislature of New York, dated 5th Feb. last, for calling a convention to consider amendments, which after being read over, was disposed of in the same manner which the application from Virginia
Also tagged as: House, Amendments, Congress, Preserved
'Another member, to wit, John Vining, from Delaware, appeared and took his seat' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 6 May 1789). [Editor's note: As both the House Journal and the Annals state, Vining arrived in Congress on 6 May 1789. However, the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that day. As a result, he is here represented as joining the Committee of the Whole on its first meeting following his arrival.]
Also tagged as: State, House, Following, First, Congress
'The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union. Mr. Speaker left the chair. Mr. Trumbull took the chair of the committee' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 19 May 1789). [Editor's note: Though the Committee of the Whole does not, on this day, discuss a topic relevant to the Bill of Rights, an important procedural event takes place that has some bearing on the Bill of Rights proceedings and reoccurs la
Also tagged as: Several, House, Congress, First, Resolved, Rights, State, Order, Rules, Place, According
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: Congress
'The motion being changed for the rising of the committee, it was agreed to' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 399).
Also tagged as: Congress
Motion to Postpone Consideration of Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Amendments, Subject, States, Make, Take, Constitution, Number, Fourth, According, Fifth, Time
'Another member, to wit: Michael Jenifer Stone, from Maryland, appeared, and took his seat; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to him by the Speaker, pursuant to a late act of Congress.'
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, Congress, Oath, States, Constitution
Madison's Motion to Consider Amendments in the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, State, Subject, States, Take, Constitution, Amendments, Fifth
Smith's Proposal for a Select Committee
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Public, Consent, Taken, State, States, Case, Subject, Take, Conventions, Necessary, Amendments, Time
'Mr. JACKSON.—I am of the opinion we ought not to be in a hurry with respect to altering the constitution. For my part, I have no idea of speculating in this serious manner on theory. If I agree to alterations in the mode of administering this Government, I shall like to stand on the sure ground of experience, and not be treading air. What experience have we had of the good or bad qualities of this constitution? Can any gentleman affirm to me one proposition that is a certain and absolute amend
Also tagged as: Senate, Taken, States, Take, Keep, Place, United, Jury, State, Answer, Congress, Government, Make, Certain, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, Respecting, Ground, Part, Subject, Put, Amendment, Deny
Jackson's Proposal to Postpone Discussion of Amendments to 1 March 1790
Also tagged as: United, Congress, First, Trial, Following, State, States, Subject, Ratified, Adopting, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Mr. GOODHUE observed, that though he considered it as being premature to take up the subject of amendments at the present time; yet he could not conceive the propriety of postponing the matter to so long a period—it certainly was the general idea that amendments should be considered, and a regard to the wishes of our constituents required that they should be attended to as soon as public interest permitted. Mr. BURKE made some objections of a similar import with those which fell from Mr. G
Also tagged as: Senate, States, Take, Place, United, Required, Public, Persons, First, Law, House, Congress, Make, Certain, Ratified, Constitution, According, Amendments, Respecting, People, Several, Necessary, Time, Rights, Subject, Ascertained, Thirds, Construed
'Mr. MADISON.—I am sorry to be accessary [sic] to the loss of a single moment of time by the House. If I had been indulged in my motion, and we had gone into a Committee of the whole, I think we might have rose and resumed the consideration of other businesses before this time; that is, so far as it depended upon what I proposed to bring forward. As that mode seems not to give satisfaction, I will withdraw the motion, and move you, sir, that a select committee be appointed to consider and report
Also tagged as: Several, House, Congress, Proposed, Second, Legislatures, States, Constitution, Amendments, Fifth, Original, Time
Madison's Motion to Appoint a Select Committee on Amendments
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Effects, Congress, Proposed, Legislatures, States, Put, Constitution, Amendments, Fifth, Speech, Time
Madison's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: Use, Prevent, State, Disparage, Exercise, Freedom, Representative, Confidence, Liberty, Respecting, Time, Proposed, Things, Violated, Fourth, Amendment, Others, States, Establishment, United, Public, Order, Favor, Arising, Abridging, Government, Ratified, Right, Rights, Articles, Number, Fifth, Senate, Taken, Take, Conventions, Value, America, Required, Houses, Persons, Danger, First, Answer, House, Case, Controversy, Certain, Make, Constitution, Amendments, People, Necessary, Ground, Representatives, Legislatures, Court, Subject, Secure, Suits, Thirty, Enumeration, Press, Defence, Criminal, Thousand, Delegated, Security, Compelled, Fact, Best, Common, Retained, Compensation, Place, Purposes, Jury, Trial, Nature, Proportion, Warrants, Obtaining, Cases, Added, Reserved, Law, Congress, Exceed, Effect, Powers, Service, Varying, Several, Part, Put
'Mr. JACKSON.—The more I consider the subject of amendments, the more I am convinced it is improper. I revere the rights of my constituents as much as any gentleman in Congress, yet I am against inserting a declaration of rights in the constitution, and that for some of the reasons referred to by the gentleman last up. If such an addition is not dangerous or improper, it is at least unnecessary: that is a sufficient reason for not entering into the subject at a time when there are urgent calls f
Also tagged as: Press, Senate, Defence, Life, Security, Taken, States, Supported, Conventions, Take, Establishment, Infringed, Prevent, Due, Best, Place, Speech, Person, United, America, Jury, Peace, Required, Public, Trial, State, Order, Houses, Persons, Favor, Cases, Exercise, Private, First, Danger, Freedom, Law, House, Government, Congress, Property, Confidence, Case, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Ratified, Constitution, Powers, Right, Third, Amendments, Respecting, Time, Necessary, People, Several, Proposed, War, Representatives, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Consent, Suits, Secure, Subject, Addition, Desire, Part, Adopting, Number, Amendment, Deny
Motion to Defer Consideration of Amendments Until 1 July 1789
Also tagged as: Order, Amendments, Congress
'Mr. SUMTER.—I consider the subject of amendments of such great importance to the Union, that I shall be glad to see it undertaken in any manner. I am not, Mr. Speaker disposed to sacrifice substance to form; therefore, whether the business shall originate in a Committee of the whole, or in the House, is a matter of indifference to me, so that it be put in train. Although I am seriously inclined to give this subject a full discussion, yet I do not wish it to be fully entered into at present, but
Also tagged as: States, Take, Conventions, Public, State, Obtaining, Exercise, House, Congress, Government, Confidence, Powers, Constitution, Amendments, People, Time, Respecting, Rights, Committed, Things, Subject, Put
'Mr. MADISON arose and withdrew his last motion for a select committee...' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 10 June 1789). *** 'Mr. MADISON found himself unfortunate in not satisfying gentlemen with respect to the mode of introducing the business; he thought from the dignity and peculiarity of the subject, that it ought to be referred to a Committee of the whole. He accordingly made that motion first, but finding himself not likely to succeed in that way, he had changed his groun
Also tagged as: United, House, Ground, Congress, Proposed, Following, States, Subject, Order, Amendment, Amendments, Original, Time
Motion to Adopt Madison's Proposed Amendments as Resolutions
Also tagged as: United, House, Ground, Congress, Proposed, States, Subject, Constitution, Number, Amendments
Motion to Refer the Motion to Adopt Madison's Proposed Amendments as Resolutions to the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Legislatures, State, Part, States, Certain, Ratified, Constitution, Amendments
'Mr. [BLAND] LEE thought it ought to be taken up in that committee; and hoped his colleague would bring the propositions before the committee, when on the state of the Union, as he had originally intended' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 467).
Also tagged as: State, Taken, Congress
Boudinot's Motion to Appoint a Select Committee on Amendments
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, State, States, Amendments
'At length Mr. LAWRENCE's motion was agreed to, and Mr. MADISON's propositions were ordered to be referred to a Committee of the whole' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 468). *** 'After a few more observations the motion of Mr. LAWRANCE being put was carried in the affirmative' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 10 June 1789). *** 'A motion was made and seconded, that the House do come to a resolution, stating certain specific amendments, proper to be proposed by Con
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Legislatures, State, Part, States, Put, Certain, Ratified, Constitution, Amendments
[Editor's note: Gerry's motion to postpone consideration of amendments to 1 July does not seem to have received a second and was not taken up for discussion or vote (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 466).]
Also tagged as: Second, Taken, Amendments, Congress
'Mr. BOUDINOT wished the appointment of a select committee, but afterwards withdrew his motion' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 468).
Also tagged as: Congress
'At length Mr. Lawrence's motion was agreed to, and Mr. Madison's propositions were ordered to be referred to a Committee of the whole' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong. 1st sess., 468). *** 'A motion was made and seconded, that the House do come to a resolution, stating certain specific amendments, proper to be proposed by Congress to the Legislatures of the States, to become, if ratified by three-fourths thereof, part of the Constitution of the United States: Whereupon, Ordered, That the
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Legislatures, State, Part, States, Certain, Ratified, Constitution, Amendments
'Another member, to wit: Michael Jenifer Stone, from Maryland, appeared, and took his seat...' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 8 June 1789). [Editor's note: As both the House Journal and the Annals state, Stone arrived at Congress on 8 June 1789. However, though Madison's amendments were referred to the Committee of the Whole on that day, the Committee did not hold a formal meeting. As a result, Stone is here represented as joining the Committee of the Whole on the following day –
Also tagged as: House, Congress, First, State, Following, Amendments
Madison's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, First, Legislatures, Following, Taken, States, State, Part, Certain, Ratified, Constitution, Amendments
Implied Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: House, Congress
'The committee then rose and reported progress, and the House adjourned' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 468).
Also tagged as: House, Congress
'Two other members, to wit: John Brown, from Virginia...appeared, and took their seats; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to them by the Speaker, pursuant to a late act of Congress.'
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, Congress, Oath, States, Constitution
'Two other members, to wit...Theodore Sedgwick, from Massachusetts, appeared, and took their seats; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to them by the Speaker, pursuant to a late act of Congress.'
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, Congress, Oath, States, Constitution
'Two other members, to wit: John Brown, from Virginia, and Theodore Sedgwick, from Massachusetts, appeared and took their seats; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to them by the Speaker; pursuant to a late act of Congress' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 15 June 1789). [Editor's note: As both the House Journal and the Annals state, Brown arrived at Congress on 15 June. However, the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that da
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, House, Congress, Oath, State, Following, States, Constitution, First
'Two other members, to wit: John Brown, from Virginia, and Theodore Sedgwick, from Massachusetts, appeared and took their seats; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to them by the Speaker; pursuant to a late act of Congress' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 15 June 1789). [Editor's note: As both the House Journal and the Annals state, Sedgwick arrived at Congress on 15 June. However, the Committee of the Whole did not meet on that
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, House, Congress, Oath, State, Following, States, Constitution, First
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: Congress
'On motion, the committee rose and reported progress' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 498).
Also tagged as: Congress
'Another Member, to wit: George Mathews, from Georgia, appeared and took his seat; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to him by the Speaker, pursuant to a late act of Congress.'
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, Congress, Oath, States, Constitution
'Another Member, to wit: George Mathews, from Georgia, appeared, and took his seat; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to him by the Speaker, pursuant to a late act of Congress.'
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, Congress, Oath, States, Constitution
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: Congress
'On motion, the committee then rose, and the Speaker resumed the chair' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 533).
Also tagged as: Congress
Madison's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
Madison's Motion to Go Into a Committee of the Whole on Amendments
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, State, States, Subject, Order, Take, Constitution, Amendments
Massachusetts Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
Ames' Motion to Refer Amendments to a Select Committee
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, First, State, States, Subject, Amendments
South Carolina Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Mr. SEDGWICK opposed the motion, for the reasons given by his colleague, observing that the members from the several States proposing amendments would no doubt drag the House through the consideration of every one, whatever their fate might be after they were discussed; now gentlemen had only to reflect on this, and conceive the length of time the business would take up, if managed in this way. Mr. WHITE thought no time would be saved by appointing a select committee. Every member would Iik
Also tagged as: Security, Taken, States, Supported, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Value, Trial, State, Houses, House, Congress, Government, Constitution, Witness, Amendments, Necessary, People, Several, Time, Proposed, Rights, Probable, Subject, Fifth
New Hampshire Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Mr. AMES proposed that the committee of the whole house should be discharged from their obligation to consider the motion of 8th of June on the subject of amendments, and that the said motion [Madison's proposals], and such other amendments as have been proposed by the several States be referred to a special committee—this being seconded by several members, occasioned a debate, which terminated in favor of the motion of Mr. AMES, by a large majority...' (Gazette of the United States, edition of
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, State, States, Subject, Favor, Amendments
Virginia Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
Gerry's Motion to Bring State Amendments Forward
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Proposed, State, Make, Conventions, Amendments
Amendments Proposed by the Virginia Convention
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Mr. PAGE replied, that such motion would be out of order, until the present question was determined. A desultory conversation ensued, and it was questioned whether the subject generally was to be before the Committee of the whole, or those specific propositions only which had already been introduced. Mr. GERRY said, that it was a matter of indifference how this question was understood, because no gentleman could pretend to deny another the privilege of bringing forward propositions conf
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Security, Taken, States, Take, Conventions, Keep, Fact, Prevent, Place, United, Required, Public, Less, State, Extending, Order, Houses, Added, Amendment, Danger, House, Government, Congress, Effect, Certain, Constitution, Amendments, Time, Respecting, People, Necessary, Several, Proposed, Rights, Part, Subject, Put, Thirds, Rules, Press, Deny
New York Form of Ratification
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'Ordered, That the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union be discharged from proceeding on a motion referred to the said committee, on the eighth day of June last, stating certain specific amendments proper to be proposed by Congress to the Legislatures of the States, to become, if ratified by three-fourths thereof, part of the Constitution of the United States; and that the said motion, together with the amendments to the said Constitution, as proposed by the several States, be
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Eighth, Congress, Proposed, Legislatures, State, Part, States, Subject, Certain, Take, Ratified, Adopting, Constitution, Amendments
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give ever
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
[Editor's note: At this point in the proceedings, Madison moves to go into the Committee of the Whole to consider amendments to the Constitution. Several delegates argued the expedience of this idea and either rejected it outright or suggested, rather, that a select committee be appointed to consider the states' objections to the Constitution. Page, for instance, expresses that '[h]e thought it would be very agreeable to the majority of the Union...to find that the Government meant to give every
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Rights, Security, State, States, Subject, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Constitution, Amendments, People
'On motion, Ordered, That the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union be discharged from proceeding on a motion referred to the said committee, on the eighth day of June last, stating certain specific amendments proper to be proposed by Congress to the Legislatures of the States, to become, if ratified by three-fourths thereof, part of the Constitution of the United States; and that the said motion, together with the amendments to the said Constitution, as proposed by the sever
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Eighth, Congress, Proposed, First, Legislatures, Following, State, States, Part, Subject, Certain, Take, Ratified, Constitution, Amendments
Implied Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Time, Resolved
'The House then resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House on the state of the Union, Mr. BOUDINOT in the chair; and, after some time spent therein, the committee rose and reported that they had had the state of the Union under consideration...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 691).
Also tagged as: State, House, Congress, Time, Resolved
Motion to Appoint the Committee for Enrolled Bills
Also tagged as: Congress
Motion to Make the Report of the Committee of Eleven the Order of the Day
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Subject, States, Order, Make, Take, Constitution, Amendments
'Resolved, That this House will, on Wednesday se'nnight [12 August], resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House to take into consideration the report from the committee of eleven, to whom it was referred to take the subject of amendments to the Constitution of the United States, generally, into their consideration, and to report thereupon' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 3 August 1789). *** 'The report of the committee on amendments to the constitution was, on motion of
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Subject, States, Order, Take, Constitution, Amendments
Motion for the House to Resolve Itself into the Committee of the Whole on Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, State, Subject, States, Order, Take, Constitution, Amendments
'Mr. PAGE hoped the House would agree to the motion of his colleague without hesitation, because he conceived it essentially necessary to proceed and finish the business as speedily as possible; for whatever might be the fact with respect to the security which the citizens of America had their rights and liberties under the new constitution, yet unless they saw it in that light, they would be uneasy, not to say dissatisfied. He thought, likewise, that the business would be expedited by the s
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Security, Taken, States, Informed, Supported, Take, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Keep, Best, Due, Fact, Place, Speech, Purposes, United, Peace, America, State, Nature, Proportion, Order, Favor, Added, Freedom, Danger, First, Law, House, Government, Congress, Land, Confidence, Effect, Certain, Make, Constitution, Amendments, Time, People, Necessary, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Consent, Crime, Desire, Subject, Secure, Part, Put, Number, Intervened, Press
'The question was now put, and carried in the affirmative. The House then resolved itself into a Committee of the whole, Mr. BOUDINOT in the chair, and took the amendments under consideration' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 734). *** 'The question being put on the motion of Mr. LEE, it passed in the affirmative. The House accordingly formed into a committee of the whole’ (Gazette of the United States, edition of 15 August 1789, 142).
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Resolved, States, Put, Amendments
'The question was now put, and carried in the affirmative. The House then resolved itself into a Committee of the whole, Mr. BOUDINOT in the chair, and took the amendments under consideration' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 734). *** 'The question being put on the motion of Mr. LEE, it passed in the affirmative. The House accordingly formed into a committee of the whole’ (Gazette of the United States, edition of 15 August 1789, 142).
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Resolved, States, Put, Amendments
Report of the Committee of Eleven
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Resolved, Subject, States, Put, Take, Constitution, Amendments
Report of the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Resolved, Amendments, States, Subject, Order, Take, Constitution, According
Report of the Committee of the Whole - First Proposition
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Resolved, First, Following, Establishment, Constitution, Amendments, People
Sherman's Amendment to the First Proposition
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Following, States, Supported, Valid, Place, Original, Purposes, United, State, First, Assembled, Law, House, Congress, Resolved, Case, Effect, Ratified, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Varying, People, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Intents, Legislatures, Part, Articles, Amendment
'Mr. MADISON—Form, sir, is always of less importance than the substance; but on this occasion, I admit that form is of some consequence, and it will be well for the House to pursue that which, upon reflection, shall appear the most eligible. Now it appears to me, that there is a neatness and propriety in incorporating the amendments into the constitution itself; in that case the system will remain uniform and entire; it will certainly be more simple, when the amendments are interwoven into thos
Also tagged as: States, Supported, Take, Place, Original, United, Less, State, Order, Added, Arising, Law, House, Congress, Case, Liberty, Ratified, Constitution, Right, According, Amendments, People, Several, Proposed, Addition, Legislatures, Part, Suits, Ascertained, Amendment
Point of Order
Also tagged as: Order, House, Amendments, Congress, Proposed
[Editor's note: Tucker's point of order – to get the sense of the House as to whether the Committee of the Whole was limited to consideration of the amendments proposed in the Committee of Eleven's report – apparently went unnoticed, as the debate continued on whether the amendments should be incorporated into the body of the Constitution or whether they should be annexed to the end of the body (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 736). It is accordingly represented here as dropped.]
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Proposed, Order, Constitution, Amendments
'Mr. LIVERMORE was clearly of opinion, that whatever amendments were made to the constitution, they ought to stand separate from the original instrument. We have no right, said he, to alter a clause, any otherwise than by a new proposition. We have well-established precedents for such a mode of procedure in the practice of the British Parliament and the State Legislatures throughout America. I do not mean, however, to assert that there has been no instance of a repeal of the whole law on enactin
Also tagged as: Defence, Senate, Others, Taken, States, Valid, Take, Conventions, Use, Fact, Best, Retained, Place, Original, Purposes, United, America, Public, Less, State, Order, Houses, Favor, Cases, Exercise, First, Assembled, Law, House, Government, Congress, Oath, Case, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Ratified, Constitution, Powers, Right, Amendments, Respecting, Necessary, People, Time, Ground, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Intents, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Consent, Secure, Subject, Addition, Desire, Preserved, Part, Put, Adopting, Number, Amendment, Fifth, Construed
'The question on Mr. Sherman's motion was now put and lost' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 744). *** 'The question at length was carried in the negative' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 14 August 1789). *** 'The question on Mr. Sherman's motion being taken, it passed in the negative' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 15 August 1789, 143).
Also tagged as: United, Taken, Congress, States, Put
Point of Order on Voting Procedure
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Required, States, Order, Thirds, Constitution, Amendments, Necessary
'Mr. HARTLEY mentioned, that in Pennsylvania, they had a council of censors who were authorized to call a convention to amend the constitution when it was thought necessary, but two-thirds were required for that purpose. He had been a member of that body, when they had examined the business in a committee of council; the majority made a report, which was lost for want of two-thirds to carry it through the council. Some desultory conversation took place on this subject...' (Annals of Congress,
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Required, Subject, States, Thirds, Constitution, Place, Amendments, Necessary
'Some desultory conversation took place on this subject, when it was decided by the chairman of the committee [Boudinot] that a majority of the committee were sufficient to form a report' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 744). *** 'This question of order being referred to the chair was determined in the negative, viz, that a majority of the committee was sufficient in order to report amendments to the house' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 14 August 1789). *** 'A do
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Subject, States, Order, Thirds, Constitution, Place, Amendments, Necessary
Appeal of Chairman's Decision
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States, Put, Order, Amendments
'...it was decided by the chairman of the committee that a majority of the committee were sufficient to form a report. An appeal being made from the opinion of the chair, it was, after some observations, confirmed by the committee' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 744). *** 'This question of order being referred to the chair was determined in the negative, viz, that a majority of the committee was sufficient in order to report amendments to the house. An appeal was then made f
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States, Put, Order, Amendments
Implied Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
'An appeal being made from the opinion of the chair, it was, after some observations, confirmed by the committee. After which the committee rose and reported progress' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 744). *** 'The committee rose and reported progress...' (New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 14 August 1789, 786; Gazette of the United States, edition of 15 August 1789, 143).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
'Another member, to wit: Abiel Foster, from New Hampshire, appeared and took his seat; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to him by the Speaker, pursuant to a late act of Congress.'
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, Congress, Oath, States, Constitution
'Another member, to wit: Abiel Foster, from New Hampshire, appeared and took his seat; the oath to support the Constitution of the United States having been first administered to him by the Speaker, pursuant to a late act of Congress.'
Also tagged as: Pursuant, United, Congress, Oath, States, Constitution
Smith's Amendment to the First Proposition
Also tagged as: Amendment, First, Congress
Gerry's Amendment to the First Propsition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Government, Fifty, States, Establishment, Constitution, Right, Expressed, Fact, Amendment, First, Purposes, People
Motion for the House to Again Resolve Itself into a Committee of the Whole on Amendments
Also tagged as: House, Congress, According, Resolved, Order, Amendments
'The question on inserting the words "of right" was put, and determined in the negative' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 745). *** 'The first article of the report being read, Mr. GERRY rose and objected to the sentence, "Government being intended for the benefit of the people"...He moved to amend this clause by inserting the words “of right.” This motion was negatived’ (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 146). *** '[Gerry] moved to alter the clause,
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Government, States, Put, Right, First, People
'Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Trumbull reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said report under consideration, and made a further progress therein. Resolved, That this House will, to-morrow, again resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the said report' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 14 August 1789). *** 'The committee then rose and reported progress, and the House adjourned' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 757). **
Also tagged as: Order, House, According, Congress, Resolved
Mr. TUCKER.—I presume these propositions are brought forward under the idea of being amendments to the constitution; but can this be esteemed an amendment of the constitution? If I understand what is meant by the introductory paragraph, it is the preamble to the constitution; but a preamble is no part of the constitution. It is, to say the best, a useless amendment. For my part, I should as soon think of amending the concluding part, consisting of General Washington's letter to the President of
Also tagged as: Others, Taken, States, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Fact, Best, Place, Original, United, America, State, Exercise, Added, House, Congress, Certain, Constitution, Right, Amendments, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Addition, Desire, Part, Amendment
'The question on the first paragraph of the report was put and carried in the affirmative, twenty-seven to twenty-three' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 746-47). *** 'Some progress was made in the discussion of the report of the select committee.—The question on the first paragraph, after a short debate, was put and carried in the affirmative' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 15 August 1789, 143). *** 'Mr. TUCKER observed, that the preamble is no part of the Const
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, Part, States, Put, Constitution, Right, People, Amendment, Amendments, Original, Necessary
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Second, Congress
Vining's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Congress, Representatives, Second, Hundred, State, Desire, Forty, Secure, Constitution, Number, Amendment
'[Vining's] motion was negatived without a division' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 747; see also Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 146). *** 'This was negatived without a division' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 15 August 1789).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
Ames's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Thousand, Security, States, Take, Expressed, Prevent, Place, Original, United, Public, Proportion, Nature, Forty, Persons, Added, First, Representative, House, Government, Congress, Certain, Make, Amendments, According, Time, Respecting, Necessary, People, Proposed, Rights, Second, Subject, Thirty, Number, Capital, Amendment
'Mr. MADISON.—l cannot concur in sentiment with the gentleman last up, that one representative for forty thousand inhabitants will conciliate the minds of those to the Government, who are desirous of amendments; because they have rather wished for an increase than confined themselves to a limitation. I believe, by this motion, we shall avoid no inconvenience that can be considered of much consequence, for one member for either thirty thousand or forty thousand inhabitants, will, in a few yea
Also tagged as: Thousand, Senate, Others, Security, States, Take, Establishment, Fact, Keep, Place, Original, Person, United, America, Required, Public, Less, State, Ninth, Proportion, Forty, Dollars, Order, Amount, Favor, Amendment, Representative, Law, House, Government, Congress, Hundred, Exceed, Certain, Ratified, Constitution, Amendments, Time, Necessary, People, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Second, Part, Secure, Subject, Thirty, Adopting, Number, Fourth
'Mr. Ames's motion was now put, and lost by a large majority' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 753). [Editor's note: Ames's motion stirred up an extended debate on the floor, with every speaker against the motion citing a variety of reasons. Ames was compelled at one point to interject a second time in defence of the motion. Among the most vocal opponents of the motion were his fellow members of the Massachusetts delegation. Sedgwick noted that Massachusetts had proposed an amend
Also tagged as: Security, Compelled, Expressed, America, Required, State, Proportion, Favor, Amendment, Representative, House, Congress, Constitution, Amendments, People, Time, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Second, Subject, Put, Number, Defence
Tucker's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: States, Take, Keep, Prevent, Place, United, Public, Less, Proportion, Amount, First, House, Congress, Hundred, Effect, According, People, Proposed, Representatives, Addition, Second, Thirty, Number, Enumeration, Amendment
'Mr. SHERMAN said, if they were now forming a constitution, he should be in favor of one representative for forty thousand, other than thirty thousand…So far was he from thinking a hundred and seventy-five insufficient, that he was about to move for a reduction, because he always considered that a small body deliberated to better purpose than a greater one. Mr. MADISON hoped gentlemen would not be influenced by what had been related to have passed in the convention; he expected the committee
Also tagged as: Thousand, Senate, Others, States, Expressed, Prevent, Best, Senators, United, Public, Less, Extending, Proportion, Insure, Forty, Favor, First, Representative, Answer, House, Government, Congress, Hundred, Case, Certain, Constitution, Amendments, People, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Addition, Consent, Legislatures, Thirty, Number, Enumeration, Amendment
Sedgwick's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Hundred, Second, States, Take, Amendment, Place
Livermore's Amendment to the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Congress, Proposed, Second, Hundred, Constitution, Prevent, Amendment
'Mr. SEDGWICK suspended his motion until [Livermore's motion] was determined...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 756).
Also tagged as: Congress
'Mr. SEDGWICK suspended his motion until this question was determined; whereupon [Livermore's motion] was put and lost, there being twenty-two in favor of, and twenty-seven against it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 756).
Also tagged as: Favor, Congress, Put
'Mr. SEDGWICK's motion was then put, and carried in the affirmative' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 756). *** 'On motion of Mr. SEDGWICK, the words "one hundred and seventy-five" were struck out, and "two hundred" inserted.—And then the paragraph as amended was agreed to' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 15 August 1789).
Also tagged as: Hundred, Congress, Put
'Mr. LIVERMORE wished to amend the clause of the report in such a manner as to prevent the power of Congress from deciding the rate of increase. He thought the constitution had better fix it, and let it be gradual until it arrived at two hundred. After which, if it was the sense of the committee, it might be stationary and liable to no other variation than that of being apportioned among the members of the Union. Mr. AMES suggested to the consideration of gentlemen, whether it would not be be
Also tagged as: Thousand, House, Congress, Second, Nature, Subject, Forty, Order, Make, Thirty, Constitution, Prevent, Number
'The question on the second proposition of the report, as amended, was now put and carried, being twenty-seven for, and twenty-two against it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 756).
Also tagged as: Second, Congress, Put
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Third Proposition
Also tagged as: Amendment, Third, Congress, Proposed
'Mr. SEDGWICK thought much inconvenience and but very little good would result from this amendment; it might serve as a tool for designing men; they might reduce the wages very low, much lower than it was possible for any gentleman to serve without injury to his private affairs, in order to procure popularity at home, provided a diminution of pay was looked upon as a desirable thing. It might also be done in order to prevent men of shining and disinterested abilities, but of indigent circumstanc
Also tagged as: House, America, Congress, Consent, Part, Secure, Order, Make, Amendment, Excessive, Services, Prevent, People, Number, Favor, Private, Place, Danger, Value, Necessary
'The question being put on the [third] proposition, it was carried in the affirmative, twenty-seven for, and twenty against it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 757). *** 'Third amendment. Art. 1. Sec. 2. par. 3. [sic] Strike out all between the words "direct" and "and until such;" and instead thereof, insert, "but no law, varying the compensation, shall take effect until an election of representatives shall have intervened. The members." This amendment was agreed to' (New-Yor
Also tagged as: Law, United, Cases, Election, Congress, Proposed, Representatives, Second, Wherein, States, Effect, Papers, Put, Take, Amendment, Common, Intervened, Compensation, Third, Varying
Implied Motion to Rise and Report
Also tagged as: Congress
'The committee then rose and reported progress...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 757). *** 'Committee rose...' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 15 August 1789).
Also tagged as: Congress
Motion for the House to Resolve Itself into a Committee of the Whole on Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Resolved, Amendments, States, Subject, Order, Take, Constitution, According
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, First Clause
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Religion, Congress, Proposed, Rights, States, Fourth, Infringed, Constitution, Amendment, Amendments
'The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the report from the committee of eleven, to whom it was referred to take the subject of amendments to the Constitution of the United States, generally, into their consideration, and to report thereupon' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 15 August 1789). *** 'The House again went into a Committee of the whole on the proposed amendments to the constitution, Mr. BOUDINOT in the chair
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Resolved, Amendments, States, Subject, Order, Take, Constitution, According
'Mr. SYLVESTER [Silvester] had some doubts of the propriety of the mode of expression used in this paragraph. He apprehended that it was liable to a construction different from what had been made by the committee. He feared it might be thought to have a tendency to abolish religion altogether. Mr. VINING suggested the propriety of transposing the two members of the sentence. Mr. GERRY said it would read better if it was, that no religious doctrine shall be established by law' (Annals of Co
Also tagged as: Law, Religion, Congress
Motion to Discharge the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: House, Congress, First, Required, Second, Make, Constitution, Number, Amendments, Time
Sherman's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Delegated, States, Fourth, Make, Constitution, Amendment
'Mr. SMITH, of South Carolina, was in favor of [Ames's] motion. Mr. GERRY thought that the object of the motion was to prevent such a thorough discussion of the business as the nature of it demanded. He called upon gentlemen to recollect the consistency of his honorable colleague, who had proposed to refer the subject to a select committee, lest an open and full examination should lay bare the muscles and sinews of the constitution. He had succeeded on that occasion, and the business was put
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Proposed, Less, Legislatures, State, Nature, Subject, Put, Houses, Constitution, Prevent, Favor
'Mr. CARROLL.—As the rights of conscience are, in their nature, of peculiar delicacy, and will little bear the gentlest touch of governmental hand; and as many sects have concurred in opinion that they are not well secured under the present constitution, he said he was much in favor of adopting the words. He thought it would tend more towards conciliating the minds of the people to the Government than almost any other amendment he had heard proposed. He would not contend with gentlemen about the
Also tagged as: Effects, Others, Taken, Free, States, Compelled, Supported, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Prevent, Place, Person, Religion, Required, State, Nature, Cases, Favor, Exercise, First, Freedom, Law, Government, Congress, Make, Constitution, Necessary, People, Several, Proposed, Rights, Things, Court, Part, Subject, Secure, Put, Adopting, Regulated, Amendment, Construed
Motion to Call the Yeas and Nays on Ames' Motion
Also tagged as: Congress
[Editor's note: Roger Sherman's proposal to strike out the provision does not seem to have received a second, and, after Daniel Carroll's statements in support of the provision, the discussion on the floor proceeded to other considerations. Consequently, Sherman's proposal was implicitly dropped (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 757-59).]
Also tagged as: Second, Congress
'Mr. PAGE begged gentlemen to consider that the motion tended to deprive the members of that freedom of debate which they had heretofore been indulged in, and prevented the Speaker from giving his sentiments. He was sorry to see this hurry, and hoped the subject would be fairly treated, otherwise the people might think they were unjustly dealt by. They would have a right to suppose, with the honorable gentleman from Carolina, (Mr. BURKE,) that we meant nothing more than to throw out a tub to the
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Public, Consent, State, Desire, Subject, Case, Freedom, Common, Certain, Constitution, Prevent, Right, People, Private, Amendments, Time
Madison's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Religion, Congress, Others, Fourth, Prevent, Amendment, People
'Mr. AMES withdrew his motion [to discharge the Committee of the Whole], and laid another on the table...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 778).
Also tagged as: Congress
'Mr. GERRY did not like the term national, proposed by the gentleman from Virginia, and he hoped it would not be adopted by the House. It brought to his mind some observations that had taken place in the conventions at the time they were considering the present constitution. It had been insisted upon by those who were called antifederalists, that this form of Government consolidated the Union; the honorable gentleman’s motion shows that he considers it in the same light. Those who were called an
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Others, Taken, Conventions, Constitution, Favor, Place, Amendments, Time
[Elbridge Gerry's motion (seconded by Aedanus Burke) to record the yeas and nays on Fisher Ames's motion to discharge the Committee of the Whole from consideration of amendments was dropped upon Ames's withdrawal of that motion (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 777-78).]
Also tagged as: Amendments, Congress
Livermore's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Religion, Congress, Proposed, Misconstruction, Rights, Following, States, Subject, Fourth, Make, Amendment
Motion to Require a Two-Thirds Majority
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Subject, States, Thirds, Amendments
'Mr. MADISON withdrew his motion, but observed that the words “no national religion shall be established by law,” did not imply that the Government was a national one...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 759). [Editor's note: In response to Livermore's and Gerry's opposition to his proposed amendment, Madison withdrew it, but Gerry's jibe about Madison's choice of the word 'national' seems to have impacted Madison, who was compelled to clarify his choice of language.]
Also tagged as: Law, Religion, Congress, Government, Proposed, Compelled, Amendment
'Mr. AMES withdrew his motion, and laid another on the table, requiring two-thirds of the committee to carry a question; and, after some desultory conversation...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 778).
Also tagged as: Congress
'[T]he question was then taken on Mr. Livermore's motion, and passed in the affirmative, thirty-one for, and twenty against it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 759). *** 'Mr[.] LIVERMORE moved to strike out this clause and to substitute one to the following effect —"The Congress shall make no laws touching religion or the rights of conscience." [...] The question on this motion was carried' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 17 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition
Also tagged as: United, Religion, Congress, Rights, Following, Taken, States, Effect, Make
[Editor's note: With the passage of Samuel Livermore's amendment, the Committee adopted this amendment in its entirety. The sources do not indicate further discussion or a separate vote. Discussion proceeded to the next of the Committee of Eleven's proposed amendments (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 759; Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147; New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 17 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 18 August 1789, 798).]
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, States, Amendment, Amendments
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: Assemble, United, Congress, Government, Redress, Second, Taken, States, Grievances, Fourth, Infringed, Right, Common, Press, Freedom, Speech, People
Sedgwick's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Assemble, United, House, Congress, Things, States, Secure, Effect, Subject, Make, Fourth, Retained, Constitution, Right, Necessary, People, Amendment, Freedom, Speech, Time
'Mr. BENSON.—The committee who framed this report proceeded on the principle that these rights belonged to the people; they conceived them to be inherent; and all that they meant to provide against was their being infringed by the Government. Mr. SEDGWICK replied, that if the committee were governed by that general principle, they might have gone into a very lengthy enumeration of rights; they might have declared that a man should have a right to wear his hat if he pleased; that he might get
Also tagged as: States, Use, Infringed, Common, Deprived, Retained, Required, Nature, Assemble, Congress, Government, Confidence, Effect, Powers, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Necessary, People, Several, Ground, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Part, Secure, Enumeration
'The question was now put upon Mr. SEDGWICK’s motion, and lost by a considerable majority' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 761). *** 'Mr. SEDGWICK moved to strike out the words "assemble and"...This motion was opposed by Mr. GERRY, Mr[.] PAGE, Mr. VINING and Mr. HARTLY [sic]; and the question being taken it was negatived (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147).
Also tagged as: Assemble, United, Congress, Taken, States, Put
Tucker's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Assemble, United, Congress, Representatives, Proposed, Part, States, Fourth, Right, Common, Amendment, People
'Mr. TUCKER then moved to insert these words, “to instruct their Representatives.” Mr. HARTLEY wished the motion had not been made, for gentlemen acquainted with the circumstances of this country, and the history of the country from which we separated, differed exceedingly on this point. The members of the House of Representatives, said he, are chosen for two years, the members of the Senate for six. According to the principles laid down in the Constitution, it is presumable that the pers
Also tagged as: Defence, Effects, Senate, Press, Life, Others, Free, Taken, States, Informed, Grievances, Wherein, Valid, Use, Take, Expressed, Prevent, Due, Best, Common, Purposes, Speech, United, America, Required, Public, Less, State, Nature, Proportion, Order, Persons, Favor, Cases, Exercise, Obtaining, Arising, Danger, Petition, Freedom, Representative, Assemble, Answer, Assembled, House, Tried, Law, Government, Congress, Oath, Hundred, Redress, Confidence, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Constitution, Right, According, Amendments, Time, Necessary, People, District, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Probable, Legislatures, Consent, Part, Secure, Subject, Adopting, Number, Enumeration, Services, Amendment, Election
Motion to Call the Question
Also tagged as: Several, Congress, Put
[Editor's note: The Annals indicate that no vote was taken on the motion at this time, as Elbridge Gerry took the floor immediately, calling to continue the debate (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 768).]
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress, Time
'Mr. GERRY.—Gentlemen seem in a great hurry to get this business through. I think, Mr. Chairman, it requires a further discusion [sic]; for my part, I had rather do less business and do it well, then precipitate measures before they are fully understood. The honorable gentleman from Virginia (Mr. MADISON) stated, that if the proposed amendments are defeated, it will be by the delay attending the discussion of doubtful propositions; and he declares this to partake of that quality. It is natur
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Security, States, Take, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Common, Place, Purposes, Public, Less, State, Nature, Order, Cases, Exercise, Private, Freedom, Representative, House, Government, Congress, Oath, Case, Effect, Make, Constitution, Right, Amendments, According, Time, People, Necessary, Several, Ground, District, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Part, Subject, Number, Amendment
Motion to Call the Question
Also tagged as: Congress
[Editor's note: The Annals indicate that no vote was taken on the motion at this time, as John Page took the floor immediately, calling to continue the debate (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 772).]
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress, Time
'Mr. PAGE was sorry to see gentlemen so impatient; the more so, as he saw there was very little attention paid to any thing that was said; but he would express his sentiments if he was only heard by the Chair. He discovered clearly, notwithstanding what had been observed by the most ingenious supporters of the opposition, that there was an absolute necessity for adopting the amendment. It was strictly compatible with the spirit and the nature of the Government; all power vests in the people of t
Also tagged as: States, Grievances, Take, Conventions, Place, United, Peace, America, State, Nature, Favor, Exercise, Private, Added, Amendment, Representative, Law, House, Government, Congress, Redress, Case, Make, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, Necessary, People, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Part, Secure, Subject, Adopting, Number, Press
Point of Order
Also tagged as: Order, Congress
[Editor's note: Sinnickson's point of order -– to clarify the question and refocus debate – apparently went unnoticed, as the debate continued in a desultory and seemingly contentious manner (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 774).]
Also tagged as: Order, Congress
'Mr. LAWRENCE was averse to entering on the business at first; but since they had proceeded so far, he hoped they would finish it. He said, if gentlemen would confine themselves to the question when they were speaking, that the business might be done in a more agreeable manner. He was against the amendment proposed by the gentleman from South Carolina, (Mr. TUCKER,) because every member on this floor ought to consider himself the representative of the whole Union, and not of the particular dis
Also tagged as: Security, States, Take, Conventions, Fact, Speech, Jury, Required, Trial, State, Nature, Order, Houses, Obtaining, Amendment, Danger, Freedom, Representative, Government, Congress, Liberty, Make, Constitution, Amendments, Time, People, District, Proposed, Rights, Consent, Legislatures, Jeopardy, Press
'The question was now called for from several parts of the House; but a desultory conversation took place before the question was put. At length, the call becoming general, it was stated from the chair, and determined in the negative, 10 rising in favor of it, and 41 against it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 776). *** 'The debate was continued much longer, but in a desultory way, as the speakers appeared to take it for granted, that they might touch upon collateral circumstanc
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Taken, States, Put, Take, Amendment, Favor, Place, Original
'The question was now taken on the second clause of the fourth proposition, as originally reported and agreed to' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 776). *** 'The question on the amendment was then put, and carried in the affirmative' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 17 August 1789). *** 'The question on [Tucker's] motion being at length taken, it was negatived by a large majority; and then the committee agreed to the amendment in its original form' (Gazette of the Uni
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Second, Taken, States, Put, Fourth, Amendment, Original
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
'Mr. AMES moved the committee to rise and report progress; which being agreed to, Mr. SPEAKER having resumed the chair...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 776). *** 'The committee rose and the chairman reported progress' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147). *** 'Committee rose' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 17 August 1789).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Third Clause
Also tagged as: Security, Free, Taken, Militia, Compelled, Use, Infringed, Keep, Best, Person, State, Arms, House, Congress, Resolved, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Third, People, Time, Proposed, Regulated, Fourth
Mr. GERRY.—This declaration of rights, I take it, is intended to secure the people against the mal-administration of the Government; if we could suppose that, in all cases, the rights of the people would be attended to, the occasion for guards of this kind would be removed. Now, I am apprehensive, sir, that this clause would give an opportunity to the people in power to destroy the constitution itself. They can declare who are those religiously scrupulous, and prevent them from bearing arms.
Also tagged as: Cases, Arms, Congress, Government, Rights, Militia, Secure, Order, Liberty, Use, Take, Establishment, Make, Prevent, Constitution, Powers, People, Necessary
Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Arms, Congress, Militia, Make, Amendment, Persons, Fourth
Jackson's Amendment to the Fourth Resolution
Also tagged as: Law, United, Congress, Part, States, Case, Fourth, Constitution, Amendment, People
Smith's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Person, Arms, Congress, Proposed, Second, Compelled, Fourth, Conventions, Amendment, Service, Respecting
'Mr. SHERMAN conceived it difficult to modify the clause and make it better. It is well known that those who are religiously scrupulous of bearing arms, are equally scrupulous of getting substitutes or paying an equivalent. Many of them would rather die than do either one or the other; but he did not see an absolute necessity for a clause of this kind. We do not live under an arbitrary Government, said he, and the States, respectively, will have the government of the militia, unless when call
Also tagged as: Person, Arms, Congress, Government, States, Militia, Make, Use, Prevent, Actual, Exercise, Service
[Editor's note: No source directly indicates that Jackson's proposal, as amended by Smith of South Carolina, was adopted at this point. The record seems to indicate that after the comments in opposition offered by Sherman and Vining, the motion was superseded by discussion of subsequent proposals on the floor, and was accordingly dropped (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 779-80). The amendment's phrasing, however, appears verbatim in the enumeration of articles of amendment as accepted
Also tagged as: House, Arms, Congress, Less, Second, State, Following, Articles, Certain, Amendment, Fact, Enumeration, Place, Time
Stone's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Fourth, Arms, Amendment, Expressed, Congress
[Editor's note: It does not seem that Stone offered his proposal as a formal motion. It was not taken up for further discussion, and further debate on the floor was overtaken by Egbert Benson's subsequent motion (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 779-80).]
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress
Benson's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Person, United, Arms, Congress, Government, Part, States, Compelled, Militia, Fourth, Make, Constitution, Right, Amendment
'Mr. BENSON moved that the words "but no person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms," be struck out. [...] The motion was negatived, and the amendment agreed to' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). *** 'The motion for striking out the whole clause being seconded, was put, and decided in the negative—22 members voting for it, and 24 against it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 7
Also tagged as: Person, United, Arms, Congress, Compelled, States, Put, Amendment
Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Arms, Congress, Government, Security, Free, State, Militia, Case, Part, Amendment, Expressed, Regulated, Best, Fourth, First
'Mr. GERRY's motion not being seconded, the question was put on the clause as reported [by the Committee of Eleven]...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 780).
Also tagged as: Congress, Put
'Mr. GERRY's motion not being seconded, the question was put on the clause as reported; which being adopted...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 780). *** 'The 6th and 7th amendments were agreed to without alteration' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147).
Also tagged as: United, Amendments, Congress, States, Put
Burke's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, House, Peace, Congress, Proposed, Security, Public, Following, Consent, States, Supported, Effect, Liberty, Put, Houses, Thirds, Fourth, People, Cases, Amendment, Time
'Mr. BURKE proposed to add to the clause just agreed to, an amendment to the following effect: "A standing army of regular troops in time of peace is dangerous to public liberty, and such shall not be raised or kept up in time of peace but from necessity, and for the security of the people, nor then without the consent of two-thirds of the members present of both Houses; and in all the cases the military shall be subordinate to the civil authority." This being seconded, Mr. VINING asked wheth
Also tagged as: Cases, Peace, House, Congress, Proposed, Required, Addition, Security, Public, Following, Consent, Effect, Put, Liberty, Order, Houses, People, Rules, Amendment, Time
'The question on Mr. BURKE's motion was put, and lost by a majority of thirteen' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 781). *** ''Mr. BURKE moved to add a clause to the last paragraph... This amendment was negatived' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789). *** 'This amendment was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149)[.]
Also tagged as: United, Amendment, Congress, States, Put
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Fourth Clause
Also tagged as: Law, Soldier, House, United, Congress, Peace, Prescribed, War, Quartered, Consent, Taken, Owner, States, Amendment, Fourth, Time
Sumter's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, House, Soldier, Congress, Peace, War, Property, Quartered, Consent, Owner, States, Fourth, Cases, Amendment, Time
'Mr. SHERMAN observed that it was absolutely necessary that marching troops should have quarters, whether in time of peace or war, and that it ought not to be put in the power of an individual to obstruct the public service; if quarters were not to be obtained in public barracks, they must be procured elsewhere. In England, where they paid considerable attention to private rights, they billeted the troops upon the keepers of public houses, and upon private houses also, with the consent of the ma
Also tagged as: United, Peace, Congress, War, Rights, Public, Consent, States, Case, Put, Houses, Private, Service, Time, Necessary
'Mr. SUMTER's motion being put, was lost by a majority of sixteen' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 781). *** 'Mr. SUMPTER moved to strike out the words "in time of peace" and also the last words of the paragraph from the word "owner." This was negatived...' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789). *** "Mr. Sumpter moved to strike out the words "in time of peace" and also the last words of the paragraph from the word "owner." This was negatived' (New-York
Also tagged as: Peace, United, Congress, States, Put, Owner, Time
Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Government, Rights, Following, Part, States, Fourth, Take, Prevent, Exercise, Amendment, Amendments, People
'Mr. HARTLEY said those things ought to be entrusted to the Legislature; that cases might arise where the public safety would be endangered by putting it in the power of one person to keep a division of troops standing in the inclemency of the weather for many hours; therefore he was against inserting the words. Mr. GERRY said either his amendment was essential, or the whole clause was unnecessary' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 781).
Also tagged as: Person, Congress, Public, Things, Keep, Cases, Amendment
'Mr. GERRY then moved to insert between the words "but" and "in a manner," the words "by a civil magistrate"—Negatived' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789). *** 'Negatived' (New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802). *** 'Negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). *** ''On putting the question, thirteen rose in favor of [Gerry's] motion, thirty-five against it...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 781).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Favor
'On putting the question [of Gerry's amendment], thirteen rose in favor of the motion, thirty-five against it; and then the clause was carried as reported' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 781). *** 'The 6th and 7th amendments were agreed to without alteration' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147). *** 'The amendment was agreed to' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802; Gazette
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Favor, Amendment, Amendments
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Fifth Clause
Also tagged as: Life, Taken, States, Compelled, Fourth, Use, Due, Deprived, Compensation, Person, United, Process, Public, Trial, Cases, Prohibiting, Private, Law, Congress, Property, Case, Liberty, Witness, Proposed, Jeopardy, Subject, Amendment, Fifth
Benson's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Person, Tried, United, Congress, Life, Trial, States, Jeopardy, Put, Fourth, Fact, Constitution, Prevent, Right, Amendment
'Mr. SHERMAN approved of the motion. He said, that as the clause now stood, a person found guilty could not arrest the judgment, and obtain a second trial in his own favor. He thought that the courts of justice would never think of trying and punishing twice for the same offence. If the person was acquitted on the first trial, he ought not to be tried a second time; but if he was convicted on the first, and any thing should appear to set the judgment aside, he was entitled to a second, which wa
Also tagged as: Law, Person, Tried, United, Congress, Danger, Trial, Second, Taken, States, Subject, Liberty, Declaratory, Persons, Cases, Favor, Place, First, Abridging, Time
'The question on Mr. BENSON's motion being put, was lost by a considerable majority' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 782). *** 'Mr. BENSON moved to strike out the words "One trial or" [sic] This was negatived' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789). *** 'Mr. Benson moved to strike out the words "one trial or." This was negatived' (New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802). *** 'This was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edi
Also tagged as: Trial, United, Congress, States, Put
Partridge's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Law, United, Congress, States, Fourth, Amendment
'Mr. PARTRIDGE moved to insert...the words "by any law of the United States." This amendment was lost also' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 782). *** 'Resolved in the negative' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802). *** 'Negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149).
Also tagged as: Law, United, Amendment, Congress, States
Laurance's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Person, Congress, Part, States, Case, Compelled, Fourth, Cases, Amendment, Criminal
'Mr. LAWRANCE moved to insert after the words "nor shall" these words "in any criminal case." This amendment was agreed to' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802). *** 'In the 8th [amendment], on motion of Mr. LAURANCE, after the words "nor shall" these words were inserted, in any criminal cases' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147)[.] *** 'Mr. LAURANCE moved to insert after the words
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Case, Cases, Amendment, Criminal
'[T]he clause as amended was unanimously agreed to by the committee, who then proceeded to the sixth clause of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 782).
Also tagged as: Fourth, Congress
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Sixth Clause
Also tagged as: United, Imposed, Congress, Required, Inflicted, States, Fourth, Amendment, Cruel, Excessive, Unusual, Bail, Punishments, Fines
Smith's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Congress, Fourth, Cruel, Unusual, Amendment, Punishments
Mr. LIVERMORE.—The clause seems to express a great deal of humanity, on which account I have no objection to it; but as it seems to have no meaning in it, I do not think it necessary. What is meant by terms excessive bail? Who are to be the judges? What is understood by excessive fines? It lies with the court to determine. No cruel and unusual punishment is to be inflicted; it is sometimes necessary to hang a man, villains often deserve whipping, and perhaps having their ears cut off; but are we
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Life, Others, Security, Inflicted, Things, States, Court, Nature, Excessive, Cruel, Unusual, Bail, Punishments, Fines, Necessary
[Editor's note: Smith's proposal, or that of Livermore, who opposed the entirety of the clause, does not seem to have received much, if any, support from the Committee of the Whole, as the Committee proceeded to a vote on the clause as reported by the Committee of Eleven (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 782-783).]
Also tagged as: Congress
'The question was put on the clause, and it was agreed to by a considerable majority' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783). *** 'The 9th [amendment] was adopted without alteration' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147). *** 'This amendment was adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). *** 'This amendment was adopted' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 Au
Also tagged as: United, Amendment, Congress, States, Put
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Seventh Clause
Also tagged as: Effects, States, Supported, Fourth, Place, Seventh, United, Warrants, Houses, Persons, Congress, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Seized, People, Rights, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
Benson's/Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Effects, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Following, States, Papers, Secure, Order, Fourth, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, Right, Issue, Amendment, People
'Mr. GERRY said that he presumed there was a mistake in the wording of this clause; it ought to be "the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable seizures and searches," and therefore moved that amendment. This was adopted by the committee' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783). *** 'Mr. BENSON moved to insert after the words "and effects," these words "against unreasonable searches and seizures." This was carried' (Ne
Also tagged as: United, Effects, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Following, States, Papers, Secure, Order, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, Right, Issue, Amendment, People
Benson's/Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Second, State, States, Warrants, Amendment, Declaratory, Issue, Fourth
'The question was put on this motion, and lost by a considerable majority' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783). *** 'This was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). [Editor’s note: The sources differ on who proposed this amendment and the one immediately preceding it, with the sources interchanging Elbridge Gerry and Egbert Benson. The Gazette of the United States reports that Egbert Benson made this motion to alter the amendment's wordin
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Searches, Proposed, Probable, Seizures, Second, State, States, Put, Issue, Amendment
Livermore's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Congress, Order, Make, Fourth, Affirmation, Amendment
'Mr. LIVERMORE objected to the words "and not"...He moved to strike them out, in order to make it an affirmative proposition. But the motion passed in the negative' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783).
Also tagged as: Order, Make, Congress
'The question was then put on the amendment and carried' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802; Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). *** 'The clause as amended being now agreed to...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783).
Also tagged as: United, Amendment, Congress, States, Put
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fourth Proposition, Eighth Clause
Also tagged as: United, Eighth, Congress, Rights, Others, Taken, States, Fourth, Certain, Disparage, Retained, Constitution, People, Enumeration, Amendment, Deny, Construed
Gerry's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition
Also tagged as: Congress, Fourth, Make, Disparage, Amendment, Deny
'Mr. GERRY said, it ought to be "deny or impair," for the word "disparage" was not of plain import; he therefore moved to make that alteration, but not being seconded, the question was taken on the clause...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 783).
Also tagged as: Make, Disparage, Taken, Congress, Deny
'...the question was taken on the clause, and it passed in the affirmative...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess, 783). *** 'This was agreed to without amendment' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802; Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). *** '11th, 12th, 13th and 14th [amendments], were agreed to in their original form' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 14
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Taken, States, Amendment, Amendments, Original
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Fifth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Jury, Congress, Rights, Trial, Second, State, States, Freedom, Amendment, Right, Cases, Press, First, Fifth, Speech, Criminal
Tucker's Amendment to the Fifth Proposition
Also tagged as: Several, United, Congress, State, States, Constitution, Amendment, Fifth
'Mr. MADISON conceived this to be the most valuable amendment in the whole list. If there was any reason to restrain the Government of the United States from infringing upon these essential rights, it was equally necessary that they should be secured against the State Governments. He thought that if they provided against the one, it was as necessary to provide against the other, and was satisfied that it would be equally grateful to the people' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 784).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Government, Rights, State, States, Take, Amendment, Retained, Necessary, Place, People
Livermore's Amendment to the Fifth Proposition
Also tagged as: Jury, Congress, Rights, Trial, State, Make, Amendment, Infringed, Expressed, Right, Cases, Press, Freedom, Fifth, Speech, Criminal
'The words on motion of Mr. LIVERMORE were then transposed, and the amendment agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). *** 'Mr. LIVERMORE...wished to make it an affirmative proposition...This transposition being agreed to...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 784).
Also tagged as: Make, United, Amendment, Congress, States
'Mr. TUCKER's motion was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 149). *** 'This transposition being agreed to, and Mr. TUCKER's motion being rejected, the clause was adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 784).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
'This amendment was accepted' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802). *** 'This transposition being agreed to, and Mr. TUCKER's motion being rejected, the clause was adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 784). *** '11th, 12th, 13th and 14th [amendments], were agreed to in their original form' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147). [Editor's note: The 19 August edition of
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Fact, Enumeration, Amendment, Amendments, Original
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: Law, United, Jury, Congress, Second, Court, Dollars, States, Controversy, Fact, Amount, Rules, Common, Amendment, According, Value
Benson's Amendment to the Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Part, Dollars, States, Controversy, Amount, Amendment, First, Respecting
'Mr. MADISON.—If the gentleman will propose any restriction to answer his purpose, and for avoiding the inconvenience he apprehends, I am willing to agree to it; but it will be improper to strike out the clause without a substitute. There is little danger that any court in the United States will admit an appeal where the matter in dispute does not amount to a thousand dollars; but as the possibility of such an event has excited in the minds of many citizens the greatest apprehension that pers
Also tagged as: Answer, Best, United, Congress, Proposed, Court, States, Amount, Prevent, Due, People, Persons, Dollars, Danger, Value, Necessary
Sedgwick's Amendment to the Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: Thousand, United, Congress, Proposed, First, Second, Dollars, States, Case, Supported, Controversy, Fact, Amount, Favor, Intervened, Amendment, Third
'Mr. BENSON moved to strike out the first part of the paragraph...This motion was negatived' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789; Gazette of the United States, edition 22 August 1789, 149-50). [Editor's note: Neither the Annals nor the Congressional Register records a vote on Benson's proposal, and the three newspaper sources appear to rely upon repetition of the initial report that appeared in the Daily Advertiser. This ma
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, State, Part, States, Amendment, First, Original
'Mr. SEDGWICK moved to insert three thousand dollars, instead of one thousand; but on the question, this motion was rejected, and the proposition accepted in its original form' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 784). *** 'Mr. SEDGWICK moved to strike out the words "one thousand" and insert "three thousand." Negatived' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802). *** 'Mr. SEDGWICK, to strengthen the clause, m
Also tagged as: United, Thousand, Congress, States, Supported, Dollars, Original
'Mr. SEDGWICK moved to insert three thousand dollars, instead of one thousand; but on the question, this motion was rejected, and the proposition accepted in its original form' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 784). *** 'The amendment was accepted' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789). *** '11th, 12th, 13th and 14th [amendments], were agreed to in their original form' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147). *** 'Mr. SEDGWICK,
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Dollars, States, Supported, Amendment, Amendments, Original
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Seventh Proposition, First Clause
Also tagged as: Prosecutions, Following, States, Informed, Common, Accusation, Compulsory, Seventh, United, Process, Public, Assistance, Trial, Nature, Obtaining, Favor, Amendment, Congress, Speedy, Witnesses, Counsel, Accused, Constitution, Right, Third, Enjoy, Confronted, Defence, Criminal
Burke's Amendment to the Seventh Proposition
Also tagged as: Seventh, Congress, Process, Trial, Court, Witnesses, Put, Amendment, Accused, Defence
'Mr. HARTLEY said, that in securing him the right of compulsory process, the Government did all it could; the remainder must lie in the discretion of the court. Mr. SMITH, of South Carolina, thought the regulation would come properly in, as part of the judicial system' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 785).
Also tagged as: Compulsory, Congress, Government, Process, Court, Part, Right
'The question on Mr. BURKE's motion was taken and lost; ayes 9, noes 41' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 785).
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress
Livermore's Amendment to the Seventh Proposition
Also tagged as: Seventh, Tried, Congress, Committed, State, Secure, Right, Amendment, Criminal
'Mr. STONE observed that full provision was made on the subject in the subsequent clause' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 785).
Also tagged as: Subject, Congress
'On the question, Mr. LIVERMORE's motion was adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 785). *** 'Several amendments to this article were proposed, some of them were withdrawn and others negatived; and one only obtained, which respected the place of trial, which was to be in the State where the supposed crime was committed' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, Committed, Others, Trial, State, Crime, States, Place, Amendments
Burke's Amendment to the Seventh Proposition
Also tagged as: Seventh, Amendment, Congress, Proposed, Criminal
'Mr. HARTLEY only requested the gentleman to look to the clause, and he would see the impropriety of inserting it in this place. A desultory conversation arose, respecting the foregoing motion...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 785).
Also tagged as: Place, Congress, Respecting
'A desultory conversation arose, respecting the foregoing motion, and after some time, Mr. BURKE withdrew it for the present' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 785).
Also tagged as: Congress, Respecting, Time
'The amendment passed' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802). *** '11th, 12th, 13th and 14th [amendments] were agreed to in their original form' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147). [Editor's note: The 19 August edition of the Gazette of the United States reports that the 14th Amendment was adopted in its original form. As indicated before, Samuel Livermore's proposal to ensure that any
Also tagged as: Others, Prosecutions, Following, States, Fact, Place, Original, Seventh, United, Trial, State, Cases, Arising, First, House, Congress, Accused, Constitution, Clauses, According, Amendments, Respecting, Proposed, Rights, Committed, Second, Crime, Amendment, Criminal
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States
'The committee then rose and reported progress, after which the House adjourned' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 785). *** 'The committee then rose, and the house adjourned' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147; New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 18 August 1789; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 19 August 1789, 802; Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789).
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: Grand, Following, States, Militia, Place, Seventh, United, Person, Presentment, Jury, Public, Trial, State, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Answer, Law, House, Congress, Indictment, Resolved, Land, Infamous, Impartial, Amendments, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Crime, Subject, Actual, Capital, Amendment
Motion to Refer the States' Amendments to a Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: Several, House, Congress, Proposed, Following, States, Order, Constitution, Amendments
Burke's Amendment to the Seventh Proposition
Also tagged as: Seventh, United, District, Congress, Committed, Others, Hundred, State, Security, States, Trial, Part, Constitution, Amendment
‘Mr. TUCKER remarked, that many citizens expected that the amendments proposed by the conventions would be attended to by the House, and that several members conceived it to be their duty to bring them forward. If the House should decline taking them into consideration, it might tend to destroy that harmony which had hitherto existed, and which did great honour to their proceedings; it might affect all their future measures, and promote such feuds as might embarrass the Government exceedingly.
Also tagged as: States, Take, Conventions, Expressed, Best, Required, Order, Obtaining, Favor, Danger, Answer, House, Congress, Government, Confidence, Constitution, Amendments, People, Time, Several, Proposed, Rights, Preserved, Amendment
'Mr. LEE thought the word "vicinage" was more applicable than that of "district, or county," it being a term well understood by every gentleman of legal knowledge' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 789). *** 'Mr. GERRY objected to the word "district" as too indefinite. Mr. SEDGWICK said, that he conceived that the proposed amendment is not so adequate for the gentleman's object as the word "vicinage"—the latter part of the clause is sufficient for the gentleman's purpose' (Gaze
Also tagged as: United, District, Congress, Proposed, Part, States, Amendment
Motion to Put the Previous Question
Also tagged as: Order, House, Supported, Congress, Put
'The question on Mr. BURKE's motion being put was negatived' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 789). *** 'The motion was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Put
'The yeas and nays being demanded by one-fifth of the members present, on this last motion, they were taken as follows: YEAS.—Messrs. Burke, Coles, Floyd, Gerry, Griffin, Grout, Hathorn, Livermore, Page, Parker, Van Rensselaer, Sherman, Stone, Sturgis, Sumter, and Tucker.—16. NAYS.—Messrs. Ames, Baldwin, Benson, Boudinot, Brown, Cadwalader, Carroll, Clymer, Fitzsimons, Foster, Gilman, Goodhue, Hartley, Heister, Huntington, Lawrence, Lee, Madison, Moore, Muhlenberg, Partridge, Schureman, Sc
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress
Burke's Amendment to the Seventh Proposition
Also tagged as: Seventh, Jury, Grand, United, Presentment, Proposed, Congress, Prosecutions, Things, States, Take, Prevent, Amendment
'Mr. VINING moved the previous question...and the question was Shall the main question, to agree to the motion, be now put?... YEAS.—...16 NAYS.—...34 So the motion was lost' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 788). [Editor's note: The loss of a vote moving the main question defeated the principle motion by terminating further consideration of that motion. Thus, the loss of the vote on Vining's motion defeated Gerry's motion in tandem.]
Also tagged as: Congress, Put
'Mr. BURKE then revived his motion for preventing prosecutions upon information, but on the question this was also lost' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 789). *** 'This motion was lost' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: Prosecutions, United, Congress, States
Motion for the House to Resolve Itself into a Committee of the Whole on Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Resolved, According, States, Subject, Order, Take, Constitution, Amendments
'The clause was now adopted without amendment' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 789). *** 'And then the paragraph was adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Amendment, Congress, States
'The House, according to the order of the day, resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on the report from the committee of eleven, to whom it was referred to take the subject of amendments to the Constitution of the United States, generally, into their consideration, and to report thereupon. Mr. Speaker left the chair. Mr. Boudinot took the chair of the committee' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18 August 1789). *** 'The House again resolved itself into a Commi
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Resolved, According, States, Subject, Order, Take, Constitution, Amendments
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Seventh Proposition, Third Clause
Also tagged as: Seventh, Law, United, Jury, Congress, Trial, Preserved, States, Suits, Right, Common, Amendment, Third
Report of the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, According, States, Order, Amendments
'The 3d clause of the 7th proposition, as follows, "In suits at common law, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved," was considered and adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 789). *** 'This amendment was adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: Law, Jury, United, Congress, Trial, Preserved, States, Suits, Right, Common, Amendment
Tucker's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Following, States, Papers, Certain, Constitution, Number, Amendment, Amendments
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Eighth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Eighth, Congress, Government, Delegated, Following, States, Powers, Constitution, Exercise, Amendment
‘On the question, Shall the said propositions of amendment be referred to the consideration of a Committee of the Whole House? It was determined in the negative’ (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18 August 1789; Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 702). *** 'Mr. TUCKER presented a number of papers containing seventeen proposed amendments to the constitution; which were read and laid on the table' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147; New-York Dai
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, States, Papers, Certain, Constitution, Number, Amendment, Amendments
'Mr. SHERMAN conceived this amendment to be altogether unnecessary, inasmuch as the constitution assigned the business of each branch of the Government to a separate department. Mr. MADISON supposed the people would be gratified with the amendment, as it was admitted that the powers ought to be separate and distinct; it might also tend to an explanation of some doubts that might arise respecting the construction of the constitution. Mr. LIVERMORE, thinking the clause subversive of the cons
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Government, States, Respecting, Powers, Constitution, Cases, Favor, Amendment, People
'On the motion being put, the proposition was carried' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 790). *** 'Mr. SEDGWICK, Mr. BENSON, and Mr. GERRY were in favor of this amendment, which was finally carried' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Put, Favor, Amendment
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Ninth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Delegated, Following, Ninth, States, Prohibited, Powers, Constitution, Amendment, Reserved
Tucker's Amendment to the Ninth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Delegated, Proposed, Ninth, States, Make, Amendment, Powers, Constitution, Place, People
'Mr. MADISON objected to this amendment, because it was impossible to confine a Government to the exercise of express powers; there must necessarily be admitted powers by implication, unless the constitution descended to recount every minutia. He remembered the word "expressly" had been moved in the convention of Virginia, by the opponents to the ratification, and, after full and fair discussion, was given up by them, and the system allowed to retain its present form. Mr. SHERMAN coincided w
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Government, States, Powers, Expressed, Constitution, Exercise, Amendment
'Mr. TUCKER's motion being negatived...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 790). *** 'This motion was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
Gerry's/Carroll's Amendment to the Ninth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Addition, Legislatures, Ninth, States, Tenth, Constitution, Amendment, People
'Mr. GERRY then proposed to add, after the word "States," and people thereof... The motion was negatived, and the amendment agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'Mr. CARROLL proposed to add to the end of the proposition, "or to the people;" this was agreed to' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 790). [Editor's note: For further discussion of this phrase's addition and the discrepancies in the reporting, see commentary, 'Roger Sherman'
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Addition, States, Amendment, People
Report of the Committee of the Whole - Tenth Proposition
Also tagged as: Tenth, United, Amendment, Congress, States
'The 10th proposition, "Art. 7 to be made Art. 8," agreed to' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 790). *** 'The five remaining amendments were agreed to by the committee, with some little variation' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 19 August 1789, 147; New-York Daily Gazette, edition of 20 August 1789, 807 [The Tenth Proposition, also called the Nineteenth Amendment, was included in the five amendments summarily reported as being passed by these sources]).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Tenth, Amendment, Amendments
Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, According, States, Order, Amendments
'Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Boudinot reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said report under consideration, and gone through the same, and made several amendments thereto...' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18 August 1789). *** 'The committee then rose, and reported the amendments as amended by the committee' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 790). *** 'The committee then rose and reported the amendments, which were laid on the t
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, According, States, Order, Amendments
'Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Boudinot reported that the committee had, according to order, had the said report under consideration, and gone through the same, and made several amendments thereto...' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 18 August 1789). *** 'The committee then rose, and reported the amendments as amended by the committee' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 790). *** 'The committee then rose and reported the amendments, which were laid on the t
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, According, States, Order, Amendments
Motion to Consider Amendments
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Taken, Subject, States, Take, Constitution, Amendments
'The House proceeded to consider the amendments made by the Committee of the Whole House to the report from the Committee of eleven, to whom it was referred to take the subject of amendments to the Constitution of the United States, generally, into their consideration...' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 19 August 1789). *** 'The House took into consideration the amendments to the constitution, as reported by the Committee of the whole' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess.,
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Taken, Subject, States, Take, Constitution, Amendments
House Report Following the Committee of the Whole Report
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Following, Taken, States, Subject, Take, Constitution, Amendments
Sherman's Amendment to the House Report
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, States, Amendment, Constitution, Place, Amendments, People
'Hereupon ensued a debates similar to what took place in the Committee of the whole...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 795).
Also tagged as: Place, Congress
'Mr. SHERMAN's motion was carried by two-thirds of the House; in consequence it was agreed to' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess, 795). *** 'Mr. SHERMAN bro't forward his motion for adding the amendments by way of supplement to the constitution; which was agreed to, by more than three fourths of the members present' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150. [Note that the section reporting the day's proceedings is mislabelled, 'WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20'; the correct
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Fourths, States, Constitution, Amendments
'The first proposition of amendment...was rejected, because two-thirds of the members present did not support it' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 795). *** 'The first amendment being taken up, on the question to agree to the same, it was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150. [Note that the section reporting the day's proceedings is mislabelled, 'WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20'; the correct date is Wednesday, 19 August 1789]). *** 'The first amendm
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Taken, States, Amendment, First
Ames's Amendment the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Thousand, Following, Taken, States, Prevent, United, Fifty, Forty, Amount, First, Representative, House, Congress, Effect, Time, Respecting, Representatives, Second, Thirty, Number, Enumeration, Amendment
'A desultory conversation took place, and several amendments of [Ames'] motion were attempted; but the House adjourned without coming to any determination' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 795). *** 'The house spent the remainder of the day in discussing a variety of amendments proposed to this motion when at length they adjourned without coming to a decision' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 20 August 1789)[.] *** 'The house spent the remainder of the day in discussi
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, States, Place, Amendments
Motion to Put Off Consideration of Amendments
Also tagged as: Several, House, Congress, Put, Place, Amendments
'Ordered, That the further consideration of the said amendments be put off until tomorrow' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 19 August 1789). *** 'A desultory conversation took place, and several amendments of [Ames's] motion were attempted; but the House adjourned without coming to any determination' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 795).
Also tagged as: Several, House, Congress, Put, Place, Amendments
'Mr. AMES's proposition was taken up. Five or six other members introduced propositions on the same point, and the whole were, by mutual consent, laid on the table' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 795-96; Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: On 19 August, Fisher Ames introduced a proposed amendment to the second provision in the Committee of the Whole's report (termed 'the second amendment' in the newspaper accounts), dealing with the ratio
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, Consent, Taken, Second, States, Amendment, Amendments
'Mr. AMES's proposition was taken up. Five or six other members introduced propositions on the same point, and the whole were, by mutual consent, laid on the table' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 795-96; Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: In the previous session on 19 August, Fisher Ames introduced a proposed amendment to the second provision in the Committee of the Whole's report (termed 'the second amendment' in the newspaper accounts)
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, Consent, Taken, Second, States, Amendment, Amendments
Report of the House - Third Proposition
Also tagged as: Law, Several, House, Compensation, Congress, Representatives, Election, Second, Taken, Effect, Fourth, Take, Intervened, Amendment, Third, Varying
'Mr. AMES's proposition was taken up... After which, the House proceeded to the third amendment, and agreed to the same' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 795-96).
Also tagged as: Amendment, House, Taken, Third, Congress
Ames's Amendment to the Fourth Proposition, First Clause
Also tagged as: Law, United, Religion, Congress, Rights, Free, States, Fourth, Make, Prevent, Exercise, Amendment, First
'On motion of Mr. AMES, the fourth amendment was altered so as to read "Congress shall make no law establishing religion, or to prevent the free exercise thereof, or to infringe the rights of conscience." This being adopted...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The fourth amendment, on motion of Mr. AMES, was altered so as to read, "Congress shall make no law establishing religion, or to prevent the free exercise thereof; or to infringe the rights of conscience." This w
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Religion, Congress, Rights, Free, States, Fourth, Make, Infringed, Prevent, Exercise, Amendment, First
'The first proposition was agreed to' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). [Editor's note: The Annals reports that 'The first proposition was agreed to', but then does not record the acceptance of the provision that could be variously termed the 'second proposition' of the fourth amendment or the 'fifth amendment'. Thus, the statement in the Annals could be read to refer to the provision 'Congress shall make no law...' or to the provision 'The freedom of speech...' depending upon
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Religion, Congress, Amendments, Rights, Second, Part, States, Freedom, Fourth, Make, Infringed, Amendment, First, Speech, Time
'The fifth amendment was agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision reading, 'The freedom of speech, and of the press, and the right of the people peaceably to assemble and consult for their common good, and to apply to the government for redress of grievances, shall not be infringed' – alternately termed, the second clause of the fourth proposition or the fifth amendment. The Annals reports that 'The first proposition
Also tagged as: Press, States, Grievances, Infringed, Common, Speech, United, Amendment, Freedom, First, Assemble, Law, Government, Congress, Redress, Make, Right, People, Second, Part, Fourth, Fifth
Report of the House - Fourth Proposition, Third Clause
Also tagged as: United, Arms, House, Congress, Person, Security, Free, State, States, Compelled, Militia, Amendment, Infringed, Keep, Right, Best, Regulated, Fourth, Third, People
'Mr. SCOTT objected to the clause in the sixth amendment, "No person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms." He observed that if this becomes part of the constitution, such persons can neither be called upon for their services, nor can an equivalent be demanded; it is also attended with still further difficulties, for a militia can never be depended upon. This would lead to the violation of another article in the constitution, which secures to the people the right of keeping
Also tagged as: Taken, States, Militia, Compelled, Use, Take, Person, United, Religion, Persons, Favor, Amendment, Law, Arms, Congress, Government, Case, Constitution, Right, According, Necessary, People, Several, Time, War, Part, Services, Defence
Amendment to the Fourth Proposition, Third Clause
Also tagged as: United, Arms, Person, Congress, Security, Free, State, Compelled, States, Militia, Amendment, Infringed, Keep, Right, Best, Regulated, Added, Fourth, Third, People
'Some further desultory conversation arose, and it was agreed to insert the words "in person" to the end of the clause; after which, it was adopted...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The words in person were added after the word "arms," and the amendment was adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision reading, 'A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, being the best security of
Also tagged as: United, Arms, Person, Congress, Security, Free, State, Compelled, States, Militia, Amendment, Infringed, Keep, Right, Best, Regulated, Added, Fourth, Third, People
'Some further desultory conversation arose, and it was agreed to insert the words "in person" to the end of the clause; after which, it was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The words in person were added after the word "arms," and the amendment was adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision reading, '
Also tagged as: Security, Free, States, Militia, Compelled, Infringed, Keep, Best, Seventh, Person, United, State, Added, Amendment, Arms, Congress, Right, Clauses, Third, People, Eighth, Regulated, Fourth, Fifth
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations'
Also tagged as: Seventh, Law, Soldier, House, United, Congress, Eighth, Amendments, Prescribed, War, Peace, Quartered, Owner, States, Consent, Amendment, Clauses, Fourth, Third, Fifth, Time
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations'
Also tagged as: Life, Taken, States, Compelled, Use, Due, Deprived, Compensation, Seventh, Person, United, Process, Public, Trial, Private, Amendment, Law, Congress, Property, Case, Liberty, Witness, Clauses, Amendments, Third, Eighth, Subject, Fourth, Fifth, Criminal
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations'
Also tagged as: Seventh, United, Eighth, Bail, Imposed, Congress, Amendments, Required, Inflicted, Fifth, Ninth, States, Amendment, Cruel, Excessive, Punishments, Unusual, Clauses, Fourth, Third, Fines
Report of the House - Fourth Proposition, Seventh Clause
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, House, Congress, Searches, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Issue, Seized, Amendments, People, Time, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
Amendment to the Fourth Proposition, Seventh Clause
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, House, Congress, Searches, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Issue, Seized, Amendments, People, Time, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
[Editor's note: The tenth amendment came under the House's consideration at this point. None of the available sources specifically record the House taking up discussion, nor do any record debate on this provision. The sources, however, record that the provision was adopted. A comparison between the Committee of the Whole report and the report with amendments presented to the House reveals a few significant alterations introduced into this amendment. The Committee of the Whole report uses the phr
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, House, Congress, Searches, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Issue, Seized, Amendments, People, Time, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations'
Also tagged as: Effects, Seizures, States, Supported, Tenth, Fourth, Seventh, United, Warrants, Houses, Unreasonable, Persons, Searches, Congress, Oath, Papers, Searched, Describing, Right, Seized, Clauses, Third, Amendments, People, Eighth, Probable, Things, Secure, Affirmation, Violated, Amendment, Fifth
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations'
Also tagged as: Seventh, United, Eighth, Congress, Amendments, Rights, Others, Fifth, Construed, States, Fourth, Certain, Disparage, Retained, Constitution, Enumeration, Clauses, Amendment, Third, Deny, People
Report of the House - Fifth Proposition
Also tagged as: Jury, House, Speech, Congress, Rights, Trial, State, States, Freedom, Amendment, Infringed, Twelfth, Right, Cases, Clauses, Press, Amendments, Fifth, Original, Criminal
Amendment to the Fifth Proposition
Also tagged as: Jury, House, Speech, Congress, Rights, Trial, State, States, Freedom, Amendment, Infringed, Twelfth, Right, Cases, Clauses, Press, Amendments, Fifth, Original, Criminal
[Editor's note: The twelfth amendment came under the House's consideration at this point. None of the available sources specifically record the House taking up discussion, nor do any record debate on this provision. The sources, however, record that the provision was adopted. A comparison between the Committee of the Whole report and the report with amendments presented to the House reveals some interesting alterations in the text that must have been undertaken at this point. The provision's
Also tagged as: Jury, House, Speech, Congress, Rights, Trial, State, States, Freedom, Amendment, Infringed, Twelfth, Right, Cases, Clauses, Press, Amendments, Fifth, Original, Criminal
'[T]hen the fifth, sixth, and seventh propositions were agreed to...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 22 August 1789)
Also tagged as: Seventh, United, Jury, Congress, Rights, Trial, State, States, Freedom, Amendment, Infringed, Twelfth, Right, Cases, Press, Amendments, Fifth, Speech, Criminal
Report of the House - Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Law, Jury, House, Congress, According, Rights, Court, Dollars, Put, Controversy, Amendment, Fact, Constitution, Amount, Common, Rules, Place, Amendments, Value, Time
Amendment to the Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Law, Jury, House, Congress, According, Rights, Court, Dollars, Put, Controversy, Amendment, Fact, Constitution, Amount, Common, Rules, Place, Amendments, Value, Time
[Editor's note: The thirteenth amendment came under the House's consideration at this point. None of the available sources specifically record the House taking up discussion, nor do any record debate on this provision. The sources, however, record that the provision was adopted. A comparison between the Committee of the Whole report and the report with amendments presented to the House reveals a key alteration in the text that must have been undertaken at this point. The Committee of the Who
Also tagged as: Pursuant, Law, Jury, House, Congress, According, Rights, Court, Dollars, Put, Controversy, Amendment, Fact, Constitution, Amount, Common, Rules, Place, Amendments, Value, Time
'[T]hen the fifth, sixth, and seventh propositions were agreed to...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 22 August 1789)
Also tagged as: Seventh, Law, United, Jury, Congress, According, Fifth, Court, Dollars, States, Controversy, Fact, Amount, Rules, Common, Amendment, Amendments, Value
Report of the House - Seventh Proposition, First Clause
Also tagged as: Prosecutions, Following, States, Informed, Fact, Accusation, Compulsory, Seventh, United, Process, Public, Trial, State, Assistance, Nature, Obtaining, Favor, Amendment, First, House, Congress, Speedy, Witnesses, Counsel, Accused, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Enjoy, Confronted, Committed, Crime, Defence, Criminal
Amendment to the Seventh Proposition, First Clause
Also tagged as: Prosecutions, Following, States, Informed, Fact, Accusation, Compulsory, Seventh, United, Process, Public, Trial, State, Assistance, Nature, Obtaining, Favor, Amendment, First, House, Congress, Speedy, Witnesses, Counsel, Accused, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Enjoy, Confronted, Committed, Crime, Defence, Criminal
[Editor's note: The fourteenth amendment came under the House's consideration at this point. None of the available sources specifically record the House taking up discussion, nor do any record debate on this provision. The sources, however, record that the provision was adopted. A comparison between the Committee of the Whole report and the report with amendments presented to the House reveals a key alteration in the text that must have been undertaken at this point. The text adopted by the H
Also tagged as: Prosecutions, Following, States, Informed, Fact, Accusation, Compulsory, Seventh, United, Process, Public, Trial, State, Assistance, Nature, Obtaining, Favor, Amendment, First, House, Congress, Speedy, Witnesses, Counsel, Accused, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Enjoy, Confronted, Committed, Crime, Defence, Criminal
'[The third clause] was adopted, as was the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, and eight clauses of the fourth proposition...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 796). *** 'The 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th amendments without any material alterations were agreed to' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). *** 'The 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th amendments were agreed to with some small alterations' (
Also tagged as: Prosecutions, States, Informed, Fourth, Accusation, Compulsory, Seventh, United, Process, Public, Assistance, State, Trial, Nature, Obtaining, Favor, Amendment, First, Congress, Speedy, Witnesses, Counsel, Accused, Right, Clauses, Third, Amendments, Enjoy, Confronted, Committed, Defence, Fifth, Criminal
Report of the House - Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Order, Forces, Cases, Arising, Amendment, Danger, House, Congress, Land, Constitution, Impartial, Amendments, Service, Time, War, Second, Actual, Fourth
Gerry's Amendment to the Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, Proposed, War, Second, Actual, Amendment
'Mr. GERRY then proposed to amend it by striking out these words, "public danger;" this being negatived...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1s sess., 797). *** 'Mr. GERRY moved to strike out these words "public danger" to insert foreign invasion. This was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision beginning, 'The trial of all crimes (except in cases of impeachment, and in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, Proposed, War, Second, Actual, Amendment
Motion to Strike Out Final Clause of the Seventh Proposition, Second Clause
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Actual, Amendment
'[I]t was then moved to strike out the last clause, "and if it be committed." &c. to the end. This motion was carried, and the amendment was adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** 'It was then moved to strike out the last clause "and if it be committed, &c." to the end. This motion obtained, and the amendment as it then stood adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision beginning, 'The trial
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Actual, Amendment
'[I]t was then moved to strike out the last clause, "and if it be committed." &c. to the end. This motion was carried, and the amendment was adopted' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** 'It was then moved to strike out the last clause "and if it be committed, &c." to the end. This motion obtained, and the amendment as it then stood adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision beginning, 'The trial
Also tagged as: States, Militia, Seventh, United, Jury, Public, Trial, Naval, Forces, Cases, Arising, Danger, Congress, Land, Impartial, Service, Time, War, Committed, Second, Actual, Amendment
Report of the House - Seventh Proposition, Third Clause
Also tagged as: Seventh, Law, Jury, House, Congress, Trial, Preserved, Suits, Right, Common, Amendment, Third
The House then took into consideration the third clause of the seventh proposition, which was adopted without debate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** '16th and 17th amendments were accepted, without alteration' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: This is the provision that reads, 'In suits at common law, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved' – alternately called the third clause of the seventh proposition or the s
Also tagged as: Seventh, Law, United, House, Jury, Congress, Amendments, Trial, Preserved, States, Suits, Right, Common, Amendment, Third
Report of the House - Eighth Proposition
Also tagged as: Seventh, United, House, Eighth, Government, Delegated, Congress, States, Third, Powers, Constitution, Amendment, Amendments
'The House then took into consideration the third clause of the seventh proposition, which was adopted without debate. The eighth proposition was agreed to in the same manner' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). [Editor's note: This is the provision that reads, 'The powers delegated by this Constitution to the government of the United States, shall be exercised as therein appropriated... – alternately called the eighth proposition or the seventeenth amendment.]
Also tagged as: Seventh, United, House, Eighth, Government, Delegated, Congress, States, Powers, Constitution, Amendment, Third
Report of the House - Ninth Proposition
Also tagged as: House, Ninth, Congress
Gerry's Amendment to the Ninth Proposition
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Delegated, Proposed, Prohibited, States, Ninth, Powers, Constitution, Amendment, Reserved, People
Motion to Record the Yeas and Nays
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, Taken, Ninth, States, Powers, Amendment
'[Gerry] requested the yeas and nays might be taken. He was supported in this by one-fifth of the members present; whereupon they were taken...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** '18th Amendment: In this Mr. GERRY proposed to insert the word expressly after the word "powers"—this being objected to the Ayes and Noes were called for on the question, and are as follows...' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, Taken, States, Supported, Powers, Amendment
'The ninth amendment Mr. GERRY proposed to amend by inserting the word "expressly,"...As he thought this an amendment of great importance, he requested the yeas and nays might be taken' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** '18th Amendment: In this Mr. GERRY proposed to insert the word expressly after the word "powers"—this being objected to the Ayes and Noes were called for on the question...' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, Taken, Ninth, States, Powers, Amendment
Sherman's Amendment to the Ninth Proposition
Also tagged as: Senate, Delegated, Taken, States, Supported, Original, United, Process, Prohibited, Ninth, Reserved, House, Congress, Government, Make, Powers, Constitution, Amendments, People, Several, Proposed, Addition, Second, Articles, Amendment
'Mr. SHERMAN moved to alter the last clause... [...] This motion was adopted without debate' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 797). *** 'This motion was acceded to, and the clause was then adopted' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150). [Editor's note: Neither the House Journal's list nor the Senate's printed copy of the amendments adopted by the House includes Roger Sherman's purported amendment to the Seventeenth Article (U.S. House Journal, 1st C
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Senate, Congress, Proposed, Process, Addition, Second, Taken, States, Supported, Articles, Amendment, Amendments, Original
Burke's Addition to the Articles of Amendment
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Government, Representatives, Addition, State, Following, Articles, Make, Senators, Amendment, Election
‘Mr. AMES thought this one of the most justifiable of all the powers of Congress; it was essential to a body representing the whole community, that they should have power to regulate their own elections, in order to secure a representation from every part, and prevent any improper regulations, calculated to answer party purposes only. It is a solecism in politics to let others judge for them, and is a departure from the principles upon which the constitution was founded. Mr. LIVERMORE said, t
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, Taken, States, Expressed, Prevent, Place, Purposes, Person, United, Prescribed, State, Nature, Order, Cases, Favor, Exercise, Amendment, First, Representative, Answer, Law, House, Government, Congress, Case, Make, Powers, Constitution, Amendments, Time, Necessary, People, Ground, Proposed, Representatives, Rights, Things, Desire, Legislatures, Consent, Subject, Secure, Part, Defence, Election
Sedgwick's Amendment to Burke's Motion
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States, Make, Use, Powers, Amendment
‘Mr. AMES said, that inadequate regulations were equally injurious as having none, and that such an amendment as was now proposed would alter the constitution; it would vest the supreme authority in places where it was never contemplated. Mr. SHERMAN observed, that the Convention were very unanimous in passing this clause; that it was an important provision, and if it was resigned it would tend to subvert the Government. Mr. MADISON was willing to make very amendment that was required by t
Also tagged as: Others, States, Take, Prevent, Senators, United, America, Required, Public, Less, State, Prohibited, Order, Danger, First, Law, House, Government, Congress, Effect, Certain, Make, Powers, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Legislatures, Secure, Subject, Number, Amendment, Election
'The question on Mr. SEDGWICK's motion for amending Mr. BURKE's proposition was put and lost' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 802).
Also tagged as: Congress, Put
Motion to Record Yeas and Nays
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress, Number, Put
'The question was then put on Mr. BURKE's motion, and the yeas and nays being demanded by the constitutional number, they were taken...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 802).
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress, Number, Put
'The question was then put on Mr. BURKE's motion, and the yeas and nays being demanded by the constitutional number, they were taken as follows: YEAS.—Messrs. Burke, Coles, Floyd, Gerry, Griffin, Grout, Hathorn, Heister, Jackson, Livermore, Matthews, Moore, Page, Parker, Partridge, Van Rensselaer, Seney, Sylvester, Smith, (of South Carolina,) Stone, Sumter, Thatcher, and Tucker.—23. NAYS.—Messrs. Ames, Benson, Boudinot, Brown, Cadwalader, Carroll, Clymer, Fitzsimons, Foster, Gale, Gilman,
Also tagged as: Taken, Congress, Number, Put
Smith's Amendment to Ames's Motion on the Second Proposition
Also tagged as: Thousand, Following, States, United, Required, Fifty, Less, Proportion, Forty, Amount, Persons, First, Representative, House, Congress, Hundred, Certain, Constitution, Respecting, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Second, Thirty, Number, Regulated, Enumeration, Amendment
'When, after some desultory conversation, it was agreed to...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 802). *** 'The following in substance, introduced by Mr. SMITH, of S.C. was adopted...' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 22 August 1789, 150).
Also tagged as: United, Following, Congress, States
Amendments Accepted by the House to the Committee of the Whole Report
Also tagged as: Seventh, Eleventh, House, Eighth, Congress, Amendments, Second, Ninth, States, Articles, Tenth, Put, Concurring, Fourth, Twelfth, Amendment, Third, Fifth, Original
'Ordered...that Mr. Benson, Mr. Sherman, and Mr. Sedgwick, be of the said committee’ (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'This resolution was referred to a committee consisting of Messrs. BENSON, SHERMAN, and SEDGWICK, who were directed to arrange the said amendments and make a report thereof' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 808). *** 'This resolution was referred to a committee, consisting of Mr. BENSON, Mr. SHERMAN, and Mr. SEDGWICK, who were
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States, Make, Amendments
'Ordered...that Mr. Benson, Mr. Sherman, and Mr. Sedgwick, be of the said committee’ (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'This resolution was referred to a committee consisting of Messrs. BENSON, SHERMAN, and SEDGWICK, who were directed to arrange the said amendments and make a report thereof' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 808). *** 'This resolution was referred to a committee, consisting of Mr. BENSON, Mr. SHERMAN, and Mr. SEDGWICK, who were
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States, Make, Amendments
'The House, according to the order of the day, resumed the consideration of amendments to the Constitution of the United States...' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'The House resumed the consideration of the amendments to the constitution' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 803).
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, According, States, Order, Constitution, Amendments
'Ordered...that Mr. Benson, Mr. Sherman, and Mr. Sedgwick, be of the said committee’ (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'This resolution was referred to a committee consisting of Messrs. BENSON, SHERMAN, and SEDGWICK, who were directed to arrange the said amendments and make a report thereof' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 808). *** 'This resolution was referred to a committee, consisting of Mr. BENSON, Mr. SHERMAN, and Mr. SEDGWICK, who were
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States, Make, Amendments
Tucker's Addition to the Articles of Amendment
Also tagged as: Pursuant, House, Congress, Prescribed, Addition, Public, Arising, Following, State, States, Case, Proportion, Articles, Added, Amendment, Amendments, Time
Amendments Accepted by the House to the Committee of the Whole Report
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, States, Articles, Make, Constitution, Amendment, Amendments
‘Mr. PAGE said, that he hoped every amendment to the constitution would be considered separately in the manner this was proposed, but he wished them considered fully; it ought to have been referred to the Committee of eleven, reported upon, and then to the Committee of the whole. This was the manner in which the House had decided upon all those already agreed to; and this ought to be the manner in which this should be decided; he should be sorry to delay what was so nearly completed on any accou
Also tagged as: Senate, Others, States, Prevent, Common, Value, United, Required, Less, State, Added, Danger, House, Congress, Government, Case, Liberty, Powers, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, Several, Proposed, War, Rights, Preserved, Subject, Secure, Amendment
Motion that Tucker's Proposed Amendment be Referred to the Committee of Eleven
Also tagged as: Law, United, House, Congress, Government, Proposed, Danger, Others, Public, Consent, Part, States, Subject, Certain, Best, Amendment, Amendments, Time
‘Mr. SUMTER felt himself so sensibly impressed with the importance of the subject, that if he apprehended the proposition would not have a fair discussion at this time, he would second the motion of commitment, and had not a doubt but the House would acquiesce in it. Gentlemen had said that the States had this business much at heart. Yes, he would venture to say more, that if the power was not relinquished by the General Government, the State Governments would be annihilated. If every resou
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Government, Second, State, Taken, States, Subject, Time
[Editor's note: John Page's motion to recommit Tucker's proposed amendment to the Committee of Eleven does not seem to have received a second, despite Thomas Sumter's threat to do so. The motion was superseded by Elbridge Gerry's subsequent motion to refer Tucker's amendment to a Committee of the Whole (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 805-07).]
Also tagged as: Second, Amendment, Congress, Proposed
Motion to Commit Tucker's Proposition to the Committee of the Whole
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Arms, Congress, Government, Proposed, War, Taken, State, States, Secure, Take, Ratified, Conventions, Constitution, People, Amendment, Amendments, Original, Necessary
‘Mr. TUCKER.—I do not see the arguments in favor of giving Congress this power in so forcible a light as some gentlemen do. It will be to erect an imperium in imperio, which is generally considered to be subversive of all Government. At any time that Congress shall exercise this power, it will raise commotions in the States; whereas, the mode of requisitions will operate in so easy a way, by being consonant to the habits of the people, that the supplies will be sooner realized in the treasury
Also tagged as: Several, United, Congress, Government, Proposed, States, Subject, Favor, Exercise, Amendment, Amendments, Time, People
[Editor's note: Elbridge Gerry's motion to refer Tucker's proposed amendment to the Committee of Whole does not seem to have received a second, with Tucker taking the floor to object immediately, and it was superseded by Michael Jenifer Stone's and George Partridge's subsequent motions (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 805-07).]
Also tagged as: Second, Amendment, Congress, Proposed
Motion to Table Mr. Tucker's Amendment
Also tagged as: United, Congress, Proposed, States, Put, Amendment
'Mr. Stone made [a] motion, that this proposition should lie on the table; this was negatived' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 24 August 1789). *** 'Several methods were proposed for disposing of this question for the present; but the motion for its lying on the table being put and negatived...' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 807; Gazette of the United States, edition of 26 August 1789, 154).
Also tagged as: States, United, Congress, Proposed, Put
Motion to Reconsider Postponing the Question
Also tagged as: Amendment, Congress
‘Mr. PARTRIDGE, referring to his instructions, was solicitous that this amendment should not be too precipitately decided upon, and moved the previous question, which was negatived’ (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 807). *** 'Mr. PARTRIDGE, referring to his instructions, was solicitous that this amendment should not be too suddenly decided upon, moved the previous question, which was negatived' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 26 August 1789, 154). *** 'Mr. Partrid
Also tagged as: United, Amendment, Congress, States
‘Mr. SEDGWICK said, that he believed his mind was as strongly impressed with the force of the instructions he had received from his constituents, as that of other gentlemen. But, sir, a Government entrusted with the freedom and the very existence of the people, ought surely to possess, in a most ample degree, the means of supporting its own existence; and as we do not know what circumstances we may be in, or how necessary it may be for Congress to exercise this power, I should deem it a violatio
Also tagged as: Several, Congress, Government, Representatives, Taken, States, Constitution, Necessary, Exercise, Amendment, Freedom, People
'The ayes and noes being demanded by one-fifth of the members present...' (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'On the main question to agree to the proposition, the yeas and nays were called by Mr. Livermore, who being supported by a constitutional number they were taken...' (New-York Daily Advertiser, edition of 24 August 1789). *** 'The question upon the paragraph being called for from every part of the House, the yeas and nays were taken' (Annals of Con
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Taken, Part, States, Supported, Number
‘And on the question, That the House do agree to the said proposed article, It passed in the negative, Aye. . . . . .9, Noes. . . . .39 (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'The question upon the paragraph being called for from every part of the House, the yeas and nays were taken. YEAS.—Messrs. Burke, Coles, Floyd, Grout, Hathorn, Livermore, Van Rensselaer, Sumter, and Tucker.—9 NAYS.—Messrs. Ames, Benson, Brown, Cadwalader, Carroll, Clymer, Fitzs
Also tagged as: Taken, House, Congress, Proposed, Part
Tucker's Second Addition to the Articles of Amendment
Also tagged as: United, House, Congress, Proposed, Addition, Second, State, Following, States, Court, Articles, Constitution, Amendment, Amendments
‘And, on the question, that the House do agree to the said amendment, It passed in the negative’ (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'And on the question being put, it passed in the negative' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 807).
Also tagged as: Amendment, House, Congress, Put
Tucker's Third Addition to the Articles of Amendment
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Addition, Articles, Constitution, Amendment, Third
'And on the question that the House do agree to the said amendment, it passed in the negative' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 807).
Also tagged as: Amendment, House, Congress
Gerry's Addition to the Articles of Amendment
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Addition, Following, Articles, Amendment, Amendments
'And, on the question, that the House do agree to the said proposed article, It passed in the negative’ (U.S. House Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 22 August 1789). *** 'And on the question that the House do agree to the said proposed article, it passed in the negative' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 808).
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Proposed
Gerry's Second Addition to the Articles of Amendment
Also tagged as: United, Person, House, Congress, Addition,