Search Results (3632)

Motion to Elect a President
Also tagged as: Elected, President
It was moved by the honorable Robert Morris Esquire, One of the Deputies from Pennsylvania, that a President be elected by ballot, which was agreed to
Also tagged as: Elected, President
Nomination of George Washington
Also tagged as: President, State, Elected, Made, Members, Particular, Proper
It was moved by the honorable Robert Morris Esquire, One of the Deputies from Pennsylvania, that a President be elected by ballot, which was agreed to — and thereupon he nominated, on the part of the said State, His Excellency George Washington Esquire The Members then proceeded to ballot on behalf of their respective States
Also tagged as: Members, Respective, States, Elected, President, State
It was moved by the honorable Robert Morris Esquire, One of the Deputies from Pennsylvania, that a President be elected by ballot, which was agreed to — and thereupon he nominated, on the part of the said State, His Excellency George Washington Esquire The Members then proceeded to ballot on behalf of their respective States — and, the ballots being taken, it appeared that the said George Washington was unanimously elected — and he was conducted to the chair by The honorable Robert Morr
Also tagged as: Elected, President, Members, Respective, States, State
The President then proposed to the House that they should proceed to the election of a Secretary
Also tagged as: President, House
The President then proposed to the House that they should proceed to the election of a Secretary
Also tagged as: President, House
The President then proposed to the House that they should proceed to the election of a Secretary — and, the ballots being taken, it appeared that William Jackson Esquire was elected. Editors' note: Madison's notes say that 'Mr. Wilson moved that a Secretary be appointed, and nominated Mr. Temple Franklin. Col. Hamilton nominated Major Jackson.'
Also tagged as: President, Elected, Appointed, House
It was moved by the honorable Robert Morris Esquire, One of the Deputies from Pennsylvania, that a President be elected by ballot, which was agreed to.
Motion that a President be elected by ballot
Additional rules and standing orders for the Convention
Also tagged as: Committee of Rules, President
Mr President left the chair. Mr Gorham, chosen by ballot, took the chair of the Committee.
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: Whole, House, Day, Journal, President, Union, Time, According, Majority, State, Directed, Elected, Made
The House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House to consider of the state of the American union Mr President left the chair. Mr Gorham, chosen by ballot, took the chair of the Committee. Editors' note: In a footnote to his 1911 edition of the Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 (specifically, the Journal entry for this day), Farrand quotes a loose page from the Detail of Ayes and Noes, which includes a tally of a vote between Gorham and Rutledge: 'Mr. Gorham | | | | | | |
Also tagged as: Day, Whole, President, State, Chosen, Union, Vote, House, Journal
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: House, Whole, President, Directed, Union, Made, State
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair. Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: Made, Whole, Directed, House, President
CXVIII. William Pierce: Anecdote. When the Convention first opened at Philadelphia, there were a number of propositions brought forward as great leading principles for the new Government to be established for the United States. A copy of these propositions was given to each Member with the injunction to keep everything a profound secret. One morning, by accident, one of the Members dropt his copy of the propositions, which being luckily picked up by General Mifflin was presented to General Was
Also tagged as: Day, States, Public, Proceedings, Least, Members, New, Member, United, House, Adjournment, Government, Days, Number, Take, Presented, Given, President, question, Time, Rules, State, Person, First
Seventh Resolution - Third Clause (Presidential Terms)
Also tagged as: States, Appointment, Amendments, Executive
On the question for seven years, Massts. dividd. Cont. no. N. Y. ay. N. J. ay. Pena. ay. Del. ay. Virga. ay. N. C. no. S. C. no. Georg. no [Ayes — 5; noes — 4; divided — 1.] There being 5. ays, 4 noes, 1 divd. a question was asked whether a majority had voted in the affirmative? The President decided that it was an affirmative vote.
Also tagged as: President, Vote, Majority, question, Years
There being 5. ays, 4 noes, 1 divd. a question was asked whether a majority had voted in the affirmative? The President decided that it was an affirmative vote. Editors note: The answer is that the previous vote should not be voided, and for this reason a Drop Proposal vote has been used.
Motion to Clarify Vote
Also tagged as: States, Majority, President, Whole, question, State, Vote, Years, Votes, Case
There being 5. ays, 4 noes, 1 divd. a question was asked whether a majority had voted in the affirmative? The President decided that it was an affirmative vote.
Also tagged as: President, Vote, Majority, question
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
The House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House to consider of the State of the American union. Mr President left the Chair Mr. Gorham took the Chair of the Committee.
Also tagged as: Union, State, House, Whole, President
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House on Monday
Also tagged as: President, Directed, House, Made, Whole
Seventh Resolution - Fourth Clause (Presidential Compensation)
Also tagged as: Compensation
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee.
Also tagged as: President
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: Made, Whole, Directed, House, President
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
The Order of the day being read The House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House to consider of the State of the American union. Mr President left the chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: House, President, Union, Day, State, Whole
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: Made, Whole, Directed, House, President
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
The Order of the day being read. The House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House to consider of the State of the American Union Mr President left the Chair. Mr. Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: Day, Whole, President, State, Union, House
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: Made, Whole, Directed, House, President
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
The House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House to consider of the state of the American Union Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee.
Also tagged as: House, President, Union, State, Whole
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: Made, Whole, Directed, House, President
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
The House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House to consider of the State of the American union Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: House, President, Union, State, Whole
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: President, Directed, House, Made, Whole
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee.
Also tagged as: President
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House On Monday
Also tagged as: President, Directed, House, Made, Whole
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Mr President left the chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: President, Directed, House, Made, Whole
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: President, Directed, House, Made, Whole
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee
Also tagged as: Virginia Plan
Virginia Plan as Reported by the Committee of the Whole House
Also tagged as: House, Whole, President, Made, Directed
Virginia Plan as Reported by the Committee of the Whole House
Also tagged as: Made, States, Different, President, Representatives, Whole, State, House, Amendments
The Virginia Plan as reported by the Committee
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Mr. President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
Mr. Hamilton, had been hitherto silent on the business before the Convention, partly from respect to others whose superior abilities age & experience rendered him unwilling to bring forward ideas dissimilar to theirs, and partly from his delicate situation with respect to his own State, to whose sentiments as expressed by his Colleagues, he could by no means accede. The crisis however which now marked our affairs, was too serious to permit any scruples whatever to prevail over the duty imposed o
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Virginia Plan, New Jersey Plan, Democracy, Corruption, Tyranny, National Executive, National Legislature, National Judiciary, Federalism, Monarchy, Term Limits, Negative, Veto, Executive Pardon, Mode of Appointment, Lifetime Appointment, Good Behavior, The States, Tribunal, Lower Courts, Compensation
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Resolve into Committee of the Whole House Tomorrow
Also tagged as: President, Directed, House, Made, Whole
Mr. Hamilton. — To deliver my sentiments on so important a subject, when the first characters in the union have gone before me, inspires me with the greatest diffidence, especially when my own ideas are so materially dissimilar to the plans now before the committee — My situation is disagreeable, but it would be criminal not to come forward on a question of such magnitude. I have well considered the subject, and am convinced that no amendment of the confederation can answer the purpose of a good
Also tagged as: States, Exercise, Powers, Executive, Public, electors, Present, Give, Years, Law, Establish, Peace, Members, Different, Officers, United, Power, Subject, Laws, Office, Case, Propose, Made, Become, Respective, Foreign, Government, Receive, Take, Senate, Legislature, Necessary, Make, Congress, Revenue, Elected, War, Whole, Time, question, State, Chosen, Appointed, Union, Militia, Appoint, Several, First
Hamilton's Plan
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Proper, Executive, Public, electors, Least, Present, Give, Years, Law, Holding, Senator, Different, United, Officers, Power, Removal, Resignation, Consist, Land, Subject, Vested, Laws, Office, Amendments, Enumeration, Propose, Made, Entered, Supreme, Foreign, Constitution, Senators, Government, Treaties, Appointment, Behaviour, Profit, Senate, Legislature, Citizens, Offices, Persons, Court, According, War, Elected, President, Offences, Place, Time, State, Chosen, Appointed, Union, Militia, Trust, Nations, Jurisdiction, Appointments
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Also tagged as: President
Report of the Committee of the Whole House
Also tagged as: Directed, Whole, Time, House, President
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee
Also tagged as: National Government, Virginia Plan, Three-Fifths Compromise, Bicameral Legislature, Supreme Executive, Supreme Legislative, Supreme Judiciary, New Jersey Plan, Republican, Guarantee, Indians, Amendment, State Legislatures, The People, Single Executive, National Executive, National Treasury, National Legislature, National Judiciary, Committee of the Whole, Admission of States, Compensation, First Branch of National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Suffrage, Union, United States, Harmony, Congress, Term of Office, Impeachment, Separation of Powers, Inferior Tribunals, Revenue
Proposed rules and standing orders for the Convention - Franklin's Proposal for Prayers
Also tagged as: Ancient World, Religion, Republic
Franklin's Proposal for Prayer
Also tagged as: Different, Several, States, War, House, Labour, Made, Peace, Service, Become, President, Time, Presented, question, Government
Motion to write to New Hampshire
President to Write to New Hampshire
Also tagged as: State, President, New, Require, Executive, States, Subject, Appointed, Supreme
The discussion of yesterday resumed. Mr. Wilson. The question now before us is of so much consequence, that I cannot give it a silent vote — Gentlemen have said, that if this amendment is not agreed to, a separation to the north of Pennsylvania may be the consequence. — This neither staggers me in my sentiments or my duty. If a minority should refuse their assent to the new plan of a general government, and if they will have their own will, and without it, separate the union, let it be done;
Also tagged as: The Revolutionary War, Aristocracy, Articles of Confederation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, Interests, Large State, Legislative Branch, Monarchy, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Slavery, Small State, Suffrage, The People, The States, Virginia Plan
Reconsider the Vote on Ellsworth's Amendment to the Eighth Resolution
Also tagged as: question, President, Vote, State, Present, Votes
Editors' note: This motion is reported only in Luther Martin's 'Genuine Information'. The motion request seems likely to have been rejected without a vote, either by decision of the President or by the strong opposition from the other delegates. Martin describes it as follows: 'On this question, Mr. Martin was the only delegate for Maryland present, which circumstance secured the State a negative. Immediately after the question had been taken, and the President had declared the votes, Mr. Jenif
Also tagged as: President, question, State, Present, Vote, Votes
Editors' note: In his State of Facts (1788), included in a letter from 21 January 1788 to the Vice President of the Convention of Massachusetts, Elbridge Gerry recollects the debate on this report in the First Committee on Representation. The relevant section of which is as follows: 'The number of forty thousand inhabitants to every member in the House of Representatives, was not a subject of much debate, or an object insisted on, as some of the Committee were opposed to it. Accordingly, on the
Also tagged as: States, Exercise, Powers, Public, Representatives, Least, Provided, Concurrence, Holding, Members, New, Member, Officers, Power, Subject, Vote, House, Amendments, Attained, Propose, Made, Removed, Tax, Constitution, Government, Number, Take, Ten, Senate, Legislature, Treasury, Offices, Revenue, Money, According, Bill, President, Bills, Time, State, Consent, Votes, Equal, Appointments, First
Mr. Governr. Morris was opposed to a restriction of this right in either branch, considered merely in itself and as unconnected with the point of representation in the 2d. branch. It will disable the 2d. branch from proposing its own money plans, and giving the people an opportunity of judging by comparison of the merits of those proposed by the 1st. branch. Mr. Wilson could see nothing like a concession here on the part of the smaller States. If both branches were to say yes or no, it was of
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Congress, Democracy, Divided sovereignty, Excess of Democracy, Executive, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Lords, House of Representatives, Large State, National Treasury, Negative, Originating Money Bills, Parliament, Power of the Purse, Proportional Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Separation of Powers, Small State, The People, Veto
Mr. Governr. Morris was opposed to a restriction of this right in either branch, considered merely in itself and as unconnected with the point of representation in the 2d. branch. It will disable the 2d. branch from proposing its own money plans, and giving the people an opportunity of judging by comparison of the merits of those proposed by the 1st. branch. Mr. Wilson could see nothing like a concession here on the part of the smaller States. If both branches were to say yes or no, it was o
Also tagged as: Houses, States, Proper, Executive, Representatives, Public, Least, Give, Law, Power, Consequence, Office, Case, Services, Use, Made, Constitution, Take, Senate, Necessary, Make, Money, Bill, Whole, Bills, First
Letter from the Secretary to the Library Company of Philadelphia
Letter from the Library Company of Philadelphia
Also tagged as: President, Use, Members
Resolved that the Secretary, by letter, present the thanks of the Convention to the Directors of the Library Company for their polite attention. Editors' note: James Hutson's Supplement to the Records of the Federal Convention contains a copy of the letter sent in reply: 'Philadelphia July 7 1787 Sir, In obedience to a vote of the Convention, I do myself the honour to request that you will be pleased to communicate the thanks of that honourable Body to the Directors of the Library Company o
Also tagged as: Present, President, Vote
Morris's Amendment for Presidential Election by Citizens
Also tagged as: Citizens, Second, House, Whole, Legislature, States, United
L. Martin's Amendment for Presidential Election by Electors
Also tagged as: electors, Second, Legislatures, House, Appointed, Whole, States, Several, Chosen
McClurg's Amendment for Presidential Terms based on Good Conduct
Also tagged as: Executive, Behaviour, Legislature, Years, Journal, Holding
Reconsider Presidential Re-eligibility
Also tagged as: Executive
Wilson's Amendment for Presidential Appointment to the Supreme Court
Also tagged as: Supreme, Court, Executive, Appointment, Second, Legislature
Gorham's Amendment for Presidential Nomination to the Supreme Court
Also tagged as: Made, Supreme, Court, Executive, Least, Appointment, Consent, Days, Judges, Years, Journal, Legislature
Madison's Amendment for Presidential Nomination and Senate Ratification to the Supreme Court
Also tagged as: Supreme, Become, Court, Executive, Appointment, Second, Days, Judges, Senate, Legislature
On reconsideration of the vote rendering the Executive re-eligible a 2d. time, Mr. Martin moved to reinstate the words “to be ineligible a 2d. time”. Mr. Governeur Morris. It is necessary to take into one view all that relates to the establishment of the Executive; on the due formation of which must depend the efficacy & utility of the Union among the present and future States. It has been a maxim in political Science that Republican Government is not adapted to a large extent of Country,
Also tagged as: Executive, Legislature, States, Time, Appointment, Appointed, Public, Make, electors, Power, Officers, Constitution, Office, Elected, Powers, Give, Chosen, Subject, War, Justice, Appoint, Whole, Case, State, Vote, Union, Necessary, Objections, Provide, Court, Duty, Years, Take, Money, Think, Exercise, Present
Mr. Governeur Morris. It is necessary to take into one view all that relates to the establishment of the Executive; on the due formation of which must depend the efficacy & utility of the Union among the present and future States. It has been a maxim in political Science that Republican Government is not adapted to a large extent of Country, because the energy of the Executive Magistracy can not reach the extreme parts of it. Our Country is an extensive one. We must either then renounce the bles
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Executive, Executive Appointment, Executive Branch, Executive Corruption, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Impeachment, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Length of Term, Lifetime Appointment, Mode of Election, National Legislature, Northern States, Republican, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate, Separation of Powers, Slavery, Southern States, Term Limits, Union
Ellsworth's Amendment for Presidential Electors
Also tagged as: electors, Legislatures, Appointed, According, States, State, Chosen, Person
President to be Chosen by Electors
Also tagged as: electors, President, Appointed, question, Executive, Chosen
Ellsworth's Amendment for Six Year Presidential Terms
Also tagged as: question, Years, Term
Mr. Pinkney & Mr Govr. Morris moved to strike out this part of the Resolution. Mr P. observd. he ought not to be impeachable whilst in office Mr. Davie. If he be not impeachable whilst in office, he will spare no efforts or means whatever to get himself re-elected. He considered this as an essential security for the good behaviour of the Executive. Mr Wilson concurred in the necessity of making the Executive impeachable whilst in office. Mr. Govr. Morris. He can do no criminal act witho
Also tagged as: Check on Power, Checks on Power, Corruption, Crime, Electors, Good Behavior, Impeachment, Judicial Branch, Length of Term, Lifetime Appointment, Magistracy, Military, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, National Treasury, Parties, President, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate, Separation of Powers, Term Limits, Tyranny, Treason, War, War Powers
Ninth Resolution - Eighth Clause (Presidential Compensation)
Also tagged as: Public, Service, Time, Receive, Compensation
Houstoun's Amendment for Presidential Election by Legislature
Also tagged as: electors, Legislature, Appointed, States, Legislatures, Executive, According, Service, Supreme, State
Gerry's Amendment for Presidential Election by Ballot
Also tagged as: Executive, Votes, Legislatures, Case, Majority, electors, Legislature, States, Journal, Vote, Person
Mr. Gerry. We seem to be entirely at a loss on this head. He would suggest whether it would not be advisable to refer the clause relating to the Executive to the Committee of detail to be appointed. Perhaps they will be able to hit on something that may unite the various opinions which have been thrown out. Mr. Wilson. As the great difficulty seems to spring from the mode of election, he wd. suggest a mode which had not been mentioned. It was that the Executive be elected for 6 years by a sma
Also tagged as: Powers, Executive, Public, Give, Provided, Years, Different, Office, Objections, Made, Use, Constitution, Appointment, Number, Impeachment, Legislature, Make, Elected, War, President, Bill, Time, Trust, Appointed, Period, Appoint, Equal, First
Wilson's Amendment to Presidential Terms and Elections
Also tagged as: Made, Supreme, Executive, Whole, electors, Consist, Chosen, Second, Number, Years, Legislature
Mr. Gerry. We seem to be entirely at a loss on this head. He would suggest whether it would not be advisable to refer the clause relating to the Executive to the Committee of detail to be appointed. Perhaps they will be able to hit on something that may unite the various opinions which have been thrown out. Mr. Wilson. As the great difficulty seems to spring from the mode of election, he wd. suggest a mode which had not been mentioned. It was that the Executive be elected for 6 years by a sma
Ellsworth's Amendment to Presidential Elections
Also tagged as: Chosen, Appointed, Office, Legislatures, Legislature, Term, Case, Whole, Executive, electors, States, Several, Supreme
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Ninth Resolution (Working Version): Gerry for Appointment by the State Executives
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Legislative Appointment, Mode of Election, National Executive, National Legislature, Separation of Powers, State Legislatures
Gerry's Amendment for Presidential Election by the States
Also tagged as: States, Executive, electors, Fill, Chosen, Appointed, Vote, Legislatures, Journal, New, Legislature, First
Mr. Elseworth. By this means a deserving Magistrate may be reelected without making him dependent on the Legislature. Mr. Gerry repeated his remark that an election at all by the Natl. Legislature was radically and incurably wrong; and moved that the Executive be appointed by the Governours & Presidents of the States, with advice of their Councils, and when there are no Councils by Electors chosen by the Legislatures. The executives to vote in the following proportions: viz -- Mr. Madison.
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Large State, Legislative Appointment, Magistracy, Mode of Election, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Separation of Powers, State Constitutions, State Executive, State Legislature
Pinckney's Motion on Presidential Ineligibility
Also tagged as: Provided, Office, Years, Term, Holding, Supreme, Executive, Person
Postpone Pinckney's Motion on Presidential Ineligibility
Also tagged as: Make
Document VI: Committee of Detail's Rough Draft
Also tagged as: First, Constitution, President, Number, Place, Powers, Court, Second, Congress, Supreme
Document VII: Excerpts from the New Jersey and Pinckney Plans
Also tagged as: New, First, Legislature, Supreme, Powers, President, Congress, Court, Consist, Constitution
Mr. Sherman. This will restrain the operation of the clause too much. It will particularly exclude a mutual negative in the case of ballots, which he hoped would take place. Mr. Ghorum contended that elections ought to be made by joint ballot. If separate ballots should be made for the President, and the two branches should be each attached to a favorite, great delay, contention & confusion may ensue. These inconveniences have been felt in Masts. in the election of officers of little importan
Also tagged as: Negative, President, Senate
Mr. Sherman. This will restrain the operation of the clause too much. It will particularly exclude a mutual negative in the case of ballots, which he hoped would take place. Mr. Ghorum contended that elections ought to be made by joint ballot. If separate ballots should be made for the President, and the two branches should be each attached to a favorite, great delay, contention & confusion may ensue. These inconveniences have been felt in Masts. in the election of officers of little importan
Also tagged as: Made, President, Houses, Laws, Treaties, Senate, Cases, Executive, Public, Case, Least, States, Several, Officers, Take, Place, Thing
Read's Amendment to Strengthen Presidential Veto
Also tagged as: Make, Duty, Constitution, Executive, Public, Subject, Give, Senate
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 2 - Pinckney's Proposal on Property Qualifications
Also tagged as: First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Property, Qualifications for Office, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr. Pinkney — The Committee as he had conceived were instructed to report the proper qualifications of property for the members of the Natl. Legislature; instead of which they have referred the task to the Natl. Legislature itself. Should it be left on this footing, the first Legislature will meet without any particular qualifications of property; and if it should happen to consist of rich men they might fix such such qualifications as may be too favorable to the rich; if of poor men, an opposit
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Eastern States, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Northern States, Propertied, Property, Qualifications for Office, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Southern States
Mr. Pinkney — The Committee as he had conceived were instructed to report the proper qualifications of property for the members of the Natl. Legislature; instead of which they have referred the task to the Natl. Legislature itself. Should it be left on this footing, the first Legislature will meet without any particular qualifications of property; and if it should happen to consist of rich men they might fix such such qualifications as may be too favorable to the rich; if of poor men, an opposit
Also tagged as: Legislature, President, Judges, Members, States, Executive, Powers, First, Think, Happen, Make, Consist, Case, Particular, State, Constitution
Mr. Elseworth was opposed to it. It would be a pleasing ground of confidence to the people that no law or burden could be imposed on them, by a few men. He reminded the movers that the Constitution proposed to give such a discretion with regard to the number of Representatives that a very inconvenient number was not to be apprehended. The inconveniency of secessions may be guarded agst by giving to each House an authority to require the attendance of absent members. Mr. Wilson concurred in th
Mr. Elseworth was opposed to it. It would be a pleasing ground of confidence to the people that no law or burden could be imposed on them, by a few men. He reminded the movers that the Constitution proposed to give such a discretion with regard to the number of Representatives that a very inconvenient number was not to be apprehended. The inconveniency of secessions may be guarded agst by giving to each House an authority to require the attendance of absent members. Mr. Wilson concurred in th
Also tagged as: Number, Legislature, House, States, Concurrence, Necessary, Members, Authority, Representatives, Give, Majority, Law, Senate, Think, Require, President, Constitution
Mr. Randolph would not repeat his reasons, but barely remind the members from the smaller States of the compromise by which the larger States were entitled to this privilege. Col. Mason. This amendment removes all the objections urged agst. the section as it stood at first. By specifying purposes of revenue, it obviated the objection that the Section extended to all bills under which money might incidentally arise. By authorizing amendments in the Senate it got rid of the objections that the
Also tagged as: British Constitution, British Model, Commerce, Executive, General Government, House of Commons, House of Lords, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Money Bills, National Government, National Legislature, National Treasury, Negative, Parliament, Qualifications for Office, Representation, Republic, Republican, Revenue, Senate, Small State, Taxation, War
Mr. Randolph moved that the clause be altered so as to read — “Bills for raising money for the purpose of revenue 〈or for appropriating the same shall originate in the House of Representatives〉 and shall not be 〈so〉 amended or altered by the Senate as to increase or diminish the sum to be raised, or change the mode of levying it, or the object of its appropriation.” — He would not repeat his reasons, but barely remind the members from the smaller States of the compromise by which the larger Stat
Also tagged as: Houses, States, Proper, Executive, Representatives, Trial, Least, Present, Particular, Years, Law, Entitled, Majority, Different, Compensation, Regulations, Power, Consequence, Subject, House, Vested, Amendments, Case, Objections, Cases, Tax, Constitution, Foreign, Thing, Government, Senate, Necessary, Make, Revenue, Money, Bill, War, Elected, Bills, Time, question, Chosen, Votes, New, First
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Madison's Amendment
Also tagged as: Congress, Judicial Branch, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Supreme Court, Veto
Article VI: Section 13 (Presidential Approval)
Madison's Amendment for Supreme Court Ratification
Also tagged as: House, Objections, Law, President, Judges, Become, Bill, Supreme, Court, Presented, States, Houses, Majority, Enter, United, Sect, Journal, Case
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendmt of the 13th sect. of the 6 article, “Every bill which shall have passed the two Houses, shall, before it become a law, be severally presented to the President of the United States and to the Judges of the supreme court, for the revision of each — If, upon such revision, they shall approve of it, they shall respectively signify their approbation by signing it — But, if upon such revision, it shall appear improper to either or both to
Mr. Govr. Morris regretted that something like the proposed check could not be agreed to. He dwelt on the importance of public Credit, and the difficulty of supporting it without some strong barrier against the instability of legislative Assemblies. He suggested the idea of requiring three fourths of each house to repeal laws where the President should not concur. He had no great reliance on the revisionary power as the Executive was now to be constituted (elected by the Congress). The legislatu
Also tagged as: Credit, Executive, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Legislative Branch, National Judiciary, National Legislature, President, Veto, War
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendmt of the 13th sect. of the 6 article. “Every bill which shall have passed the two Houses, shall, before it become a law, be severally presented to the President of the United States and to the Judges of the supreme court, for the revision of each — If, upon such revision, they shall approve of it, they shall respectively signify their approbation by signing it — But, if upon such revision, it shall appear improper to either or both to
Also tagged as: Supreme, Houses, Become, States, Enter, Majority, Court, Sect, Bill, United, President, Judges, Journal, Law, House, Case, Presented, Objections
Mr. Govr. Morris regretted that something like the proposed check could not be agreed to. He dwelt on the importance of public Credit, and the difficulty of supporting it without some strong barrier against the instability of legislative Assemblies. He suggested the idea of requiring three fourths of each house to repeal laws where the President should not concur. He had no great reliance on the revisionary power as the Executive was now to be constituted (elected by the Congress). The legislatu
Also tagged as: Executive, Public, Legislature, Power, President, Laws, Law, Constitution, Elected, Term, War, Authority, Years, Judges, Party, Different, Time, Citizens, Direct, House, State, Congress, Government, Credit, Members, Consequence
Postpone Article VI: Section 13 (Presidential Approval)
Also tagged as: Sect, Executive
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Williamson for Three Quarters, Not Two Thirds
Also tagged as: Executive, Judicial Branch, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, President, Veto
Williamson's Amendment for Three-Quarters Majority to Overturn Presidential Veto
Also tagged as: Majority, Sect, President, Power, Judges, House
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Madison to Insert "Or Resolve"
Also tagged as: House of Representatives, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, President, Senate
It was moved and seconded to amend the first clause of the 13 sect. of the 6 article as follows, “No Bill or resolve of the Senate and House of representatives shall become a Law, or have force until it shall have been presented to the President of the United States for his revision” which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 3; noes — 8.] Editors' note: Madison writes curtly, "After a short and rather confused conversation on the subject, the question was put & rejected."
Madison's Amendment for Presidential Veto of Congressional Resolutions
Also tagged as: President, Votes, Sect, Presented, States, Become, Subject, question, Representatives, Bills, House, United, Law, Bill, Senate, Adjournment, Acts
It was moved and seconded to amend the first clause of the 13 sect. of the 6 article as follows “No Bill or resolve of the Senate and House of representatives shall become a Law, or have force until it shall have been presented to the President of the United States for his revision” which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 3; noes — 8.]
Also tagged as: President, Presented, House, United, Law, Sect, Bill, States, Become, Senate, Representatives
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - "Ten (Sundays Excepted)"
Also tagged as: Executive Branch, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, President
Amendment to Increase Time for Presidential Deliberation
Also tagged as: Sect, Ten, Time
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 14 (Newly Created)
Also tagged as: Adjournment, Executive, Executive Authority, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Veto
Randolph's Motion for Presidential Veto of Congressional Resolutions
Also tagged as: Cases, Necessary, Day, Adjournment, According, Bill, President, Representatives, Rules, question, Prescribed, Vote, House, Concurrence, Case, Presented, Senate
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following as the 14 section of the 6. article. “every order, resolution or vote, to which the concurrence of the Senate and House of representatives may be necessary (except on a question of adjournment, and in the cases hereinafter mentioned) shall be presented to the President for his revision; and before the same shall have force, shall be approved by him, or, being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by the Senate and House of representatives, a
Read's Amendment for Presidential Appointment of Treasurer
Also tagged as: Appointment, Executive, Officers, Legislatures, Legislature, Appointments, State, Make
Mr Pinkney opposed the vesting this power in the Legislature. Its proceedings were too slow. It wd. meet but once a year. The Hs. of Reps. would be too numerous for such deliberations. The Senate would be the best depositary, being more acquainted with foreign affairs, and most capable of proper resolutions. If the States are equally represented in Senate, so as to give no advantage to large States, the power will notwithstanding be safe, as the small have their all at stake in such cases as wel
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive, Executive Power, First Branch of National Legislature, Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr Pinkney opposed the vesting this power in the Legislature. Its proceedings were too slow. It wd. meet but once a year. The Hs. of Reps. would be too numerous for such deliberations. The Senate would be the best depositary, being more acquainted with foreign affairs, and most capable of proper resolutions. If the States are equally represented in Senate, so as to give no advantage to large States, the power will notwithstanding be safe, as the small have their all at stake in such cases as wel
Also tagged as: States, Senate, Power, Legislature, War, Make, President, Proceedings, Peace, Authority, Objections, Give, Proper, Cases, Foreign
Proposed rules and standing orders for the Convention - Rutledge's August/September Timetable
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following resolution, namely, Resolved That this Convention will meet punctually at 10 o’clock every morning (Sundays excepted) and sit till four o’clock in the afternoon, at which time the President shall adjourn the Convention and that no motion for adjournment be allowed. which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 9; noes — 2.]
Rutledge's Motion for Extending Sessions of the Convention
Also tagged as: Adjourn, President, Time, House, Rules, Public, Members, Adjournment
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following resolution, namely Resolved That this Convention will meet punctually at 10 o’clock every morning (Sundays excepted) and sit till four o’clock in the afternoon, at which time the President shall adjourn the Convention and that no motion for adjournment be allowed. which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 9; noes — 2.]
Also tagged as: Adjourn, President, Time, Adjournment
Mr. Elseworth observed that a Council had not yet been provided for the President. He conceived there ought to be one. His proposition was that it should be composed of the President of the Senate- the Chief-Justice, and the Ministers as they might be estabd. for the departments of foreign & domestic affairs, war finance, and marine, who should advise but not conclude the President. Mr Pinkney wished the proposition to lie over, as notice had been given for a like purpose by Mr. Govr. Morris
Also tagged as: President, Made, Executive, Provided, Foreign, Legislature, Subject, Lay, Ministers, Appointments, War, Justice, Duties, Give, Consent, House, Given, Thing, Proper, Case
Adjournment
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Adjournment, President, Rules, Place, House, Take
And then the House adjourned till monday next at 10 o’clock A. M. Editors' note: As a result of adopting Rutledge's change of rules regarding sessions of the Convention, only the President could call for an adjournment. The decision to adjourn, which had to take place at 4pm, had to be the president's alone. This motion is therefore represented as a procedure decided on by the Chair.
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Adjournment, President, Rules, Place, House, Take
Gerry's Further Powers Proposed for the Legislature of the United States
Also tagged as: Cases, States, Different, Powers, United, Proper, President, Judges, Journal, Impeachment, Legislature
Adjournment
Also tagged as: President, Adjournment, House, Take, Rules, Place, question, Adjourn
Before a question was taken on the last motion The House adjourned.
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Adjournment, President, Rules, Place, question, House, Take
Further Propositions for the Committee of Detail - Gerry on Qualifications for the President and Impeachment of Supreme Court Justices
Mr. Madison observed that the Senate represented the States alone, and that for this as well as other obvious reasons it was proper that the President should be an agent in Treaties. Mr. Govr. Morris did not know that he should agree to refer the making of Treaties to the Senate at all, but for the present wd. move to add as an amendment to the section, after “Treaties” — “but no Treaty shall be binding on the U. S. which is not ratified by a law.”
Also tagged as: Diplomacy, Executive, Executive Power, Foreign Affairs, Legislative Power, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Treaties
Mr. 〈Madison〉 observed that the Senate represented the States alone, and that for this as well as other obvious reasons it was proper that the President should be an agent in Treaties.
Also tagged as: President, States, Treaties, Senate
Mr. Madison hinted for consideration, whether a distinction might not be made between different sorts of Treaties — Allowing the President & Senate to make Treaties eventual and of Alliance for limited terms — and requiring the concurrence of the whole Legislature in other Treaties.
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive, Executive Power, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr. Madison hinted for consideration, whether a distinction might not be made between different sorts of Treaties — Allowing the President & Senate to make Treaties eventual and of Alliance for limited terms — and requiring the concurrence of the whole Legislature in other Treaties.
Also tagged as: Made, Make, Different, President, Whole, Treaties, Concurrence, Senate, Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 1
Article X: Section 1 (President)
Also tagged as: Sect, Vote
Article X: Section 1 - Clause 2 (Presidential Style)
Article X: Section 1 - Clause 3 (Presidential Title)
Mr. Sherman objected to it as depriving the States represented in the Senate of the negative intended them in that house, Mr. Ghorum said it was wrong to be considering, at every turn whom the Senate would represent. The public good was the true object to be kept in view— Great delay and confusion would ensue if the two Houses shd vote separately, each having a negative on the choice of the other. Mr. Dayton. It might be well for those not to consider how the Senate was constituted, whose
Rutledge's Amendment for Presidential Election by Joint Ballot
Mr Brearly was opposed to the motion for inserting the word “joint”. The argument that the small States should not put their hands into the pockets of the large ones did not apply in this case. Mr. Wilson urged the reasonableness of giving the larger States a larger share of the appointment, and the danger of delay from a disagreement of the two Houses. He remarked also that the Senate had peculiar powers balancing the advantage given by a joint balot in this case to the other branch of the L
Mr. Sherman objected to it as depriving the States represented in the Senate of the negative intended them in that house, Mr. Ghorum said it was wrong to be considering, at every turn whom the Senate would represent. The public good was the true object to be kept in view— Great delay and confusion would ensue if the two Houses shd vote separately, each having a negative on the choice of the other. Mr. Dayton. It might be well for those not to consider how the Senate was constituted, whose
Also tagged as: Senate, Houses, House, Public, President, Case, States, Vote, Give, Appointment, Person
Carroll's Amendment for Presidential Election by the People
Also tagged as: Legislature
Mr Brearly was opposed to the motion for inserting the word “joint”. The argument that the small States should not put their hands into the pockets of the large ones did not apply in this case. Mr. Wilson urged the reasonableness of giving the larger States a larger share of the appointment, and the danger of delay from a disagreement of the two Houses. He remarked also that the Senate had peculiar powers balancing the advantage given by a joint balot in this case to the other branch of the L
Also tagged as: Cases, Law, Houses, Necessary, States, Given, Make, Officer, Powers, Elected, President, Appointment, State, Act, Give, Concurrence, Votes, Case, Senate, Legislature
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 1 - Final Two Clauses: Read on the Casting Vote
On the question to agree to the following clause “and in case the numbers for the two highest in votes should be equal, then the President of the Senate shall have an additional casting voice” it passed in the negative. Editors' note: Madison writes that the motion "was disagreed to by a general negative."
Pinckney's Amendment for Presidential Election by Majority Present
Also tagged as: Majority, Present, Sect, Votes, Legislature, Members
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 1 - Final Two Clauses: Morris for Electors Chosen by People
Read's Amendment for Senate President to have Tie-breaking Vote
Also tagged as: President, Senate, Vote, Case, Journal, Equal, Votes
On the question to agree to the following clause “and in case the numbers for the two highest in votes should be equal, then the President of the Senate shall have an additional casting voice” it passed in the negative. Editors' note: Madison writes that the motion 'was disagreed to by a general negative.'
Also tagged as: President, question, Case, Vote, Votes, Equal, Senate
Morris's Amendment for Presidential Election by Electors
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Executive, electors, Give, Peace, Service, Officers, Power, Second, Subject, Office, Constitution, Several, Legislature, Acts, President, Whole, Time, Place, Chosen, Period, Expiration, Appointments
Morris's Renewed Amendment for Presidential Election by Electors
Also tagged as: electors, Chosen, Vote, question, First
Article X: Section 2 (Presidential Powers and Regulations)
Also tagged as: Sect
Morris's Amendment for Presidential Recommendations to Congress
Also tagged as: Congress, Duty, Make, President
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 2 - Morris's Amendment
Sherman's Amendment to Limit Presidential Appointments
Also tagged as: Cases, Herein, Lay, Constitution, Proper, Executive, War, Officers, Government, Time, Appointed, Provided, Law, Appoint, Peace, Appointments
Madison's Amendment to Prevent Presidential Creation of Offices
Also tagged as: Sect, Officers, President, Appoint, Legislature, Offices
Dickinson's Amendment to Limit Presidential Appointments
Also tagged as: Offices, Provided, Appoint, Cases, Constitution, Appointments, Herein
On The question now taken on Mr. Dickinson motion of yesterday, allowing appointments to offices, to be referred by the Genl. Legislature to the Executives of the several States” as a farther amendment to sect. 2. art. X., the votes were N. H. no Mas. no. Ct ay. Pa. no— Del. no. Md divided— Va. ay— N— C— no— S. C. no. Geo. ay— [Ayes— 3; noes — 6; divided — 1.] Editors' note: New Jersey was either absent or had dropped below quorum for this vote. Jackson confuses this motion in the Journal. F
Also tagged as: Cases, States, According, Constitution, Sect, Officers, President, Several, question, Appointments, Second, Vote, House, Provided, Journal, Votes, New, Legislature, Offices
Amendment for President to Receive Public Ministers
Also tagged as: Sect, President, Public, Ambassadors, Ministers, Receive
Morris's Amendment on Presidential Powers of Correspondence
Also tagged as: Powers, Supreme, States, Several
Article X: Section 2 (Presidential Powers and Regulations)
Also tagged as: Take, Place
Amendment to Clarify Limit of Presidential Power to Pardon Impeachments
Also tagged as: Sect, Cases, Impeachment, Power
It was moved and seconded to postpone the consideration of the following clause. 2 section. 10 article “He shall be removed from his office on impeachment by the House of representatives, and conviction in the supreme Court, of treason, bribery, or corruption” which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes, "The clause for removing the President on impeachment by the House of Reps and conviction in the supreme Court, of Treason, Bribery or corruption, was postponed nem:
Mr. Govr. Morris objected also to the President of the Senate being provisional successor to the President, and suggested a designation of the Chief Justice. Mr. Madison added as a ground of objection that the Senate might retard the appointment of a President in order to carry points whilst the revisionary power was in the President of their own body, but suggested that the Executive powers during a vacancy, be administered by the persons composing the Council to the President.
The clause for removing the President on impeachment by the House of Reps and conviction in the supreme Court, of Treason, Bribery or corruption, was postponed nem: con: at the instance of Mr. Govr. Morris, who thought the Tribunal an improper one, particularly, if the first judge was to be of the privy Council. The clause for removing the President on impeachment by the House of Reps and conviction in the supreme Court, of Treason, Bribery or corruption, was postponed nem: con: at the instan
Also tagged as: Treason, Supreme, Justice, Court, Powers, Executive, President, Power, Appointment, House, Impeachment, Persons, Senate, First
It was moved and seconded to postpone the consideration of the following clause. 2 section. 10 article “He shall be removed from his office on impeachment by the House of representatives, and conviction in the supreme Court, of treason, bribery, or corruption” which passed in the affirmative Editors' note: Madison writes, 'The clause for removing the President on impeachment by the House of Reps and conviction in the supreme Court, of Treason, Bribery or corruption, was postponed nem: con: at
Also tagged as: House, Impeachment, Supreme, Court, Treason, President, Office, First, Removed, Representatives
It was moved and seconded to postpone the last clause of the 2 section, 10 article. which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes, "Mr Williamson suggested that the Legislature ought to have power to provide for occasional successors. & moved that the last clause (of 2 sect. X art:) relating to a provisional successor to the President be postponed. "Mr Dickinson 2ded. the postponement. remarking that it was too vague. What is the extent of the term “disability” & who is
Article X: Section 2 - Clause 13 (Acting Presidents)
Mr Williamson suggested that the Legislature ought to have power to provide for occasional successors. & moved that the last clause (of 2 sect. X art:) 〈relating to a provisional successor to the President〉 be postponed. Mr Dickinson 2ded. the postponement. remarking that it was too vague. What is the extent of the term “disability” & who is to be the judge of it?
Also tagged as: Legislature, Provide, Term, Sect, Power
Mason's Amendment for President to Defend the Constitution
Also tagged as: Places, Supreme, States, Constitution, Executive, United, President, Power, Judgment, Second, Office
Mr. Pinkney...remarked that there were five distinct commercial interests— 1. the fisheries & W. India trade, which belonged to the N. England States. 2. the interest of N. York lay in a free trade. 3. Wheat & flour the Staples of the two Middle States, (N. J. & Penna.)— 4 Tobo. the staple of Maryd. & Virginia & partly of N. Carolina. 5. Rice & Indigo, the staples of S. Carolina & Georgia. These different interests would be a source of oppressive regulations if no check to a bare majority should
Genl. Pinkney said it was the true interest of the S. States to have no regulation of commerce; but considering the loss brought on the commerce of the Eastern States by the revolution, their liberal conduct towards the views* of South Carolina, and the interest the weak Southn. States had in being united with the strong Eastern States, he thought it proper that no fetters should be imposed on the power of making commercial regulations; and that his constituents though prejudiced against the Eas
Also tagged as: States, Powers, Think, Public, Present, Particular, Give, Majority, Different, United, Regulations, Power, Bound, Navy, Removal, Subject, Vote, House, Case, Objections, Enumeration, Made, Cases, Use, Foreign, Constitution, Take, Stated, Require, Necessary, Congress, Acts, Place, Act, Union, Votes, Nations
Morris's Amendment to Remove Choice of President by Congress
Also tagged as: President, Choose, Congress, Choosing, question
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXIII: Remaining Part - Morris to Strike Out "Choose the President"
It was moved and seconded to strike the words “choose the President of the United States and” out of the 23rd article which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 8; noes — 2; divided — 1.]
Also tagged as: United, President, Choose, States
It was moved and seconded to strike the words “choose the President of the United States and” out of the 23rd article which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 8; noes — 2; divided — 1.]
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Time, Proceedings, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
To adjourn Ayes — 2; noes — 8. Editors' note: This motion may have been out of order, though the Convention clearly allowed it. On 18 August Rutledge's motion to regulate the meeting times and adjournments of the Convention passed, setting a new rule for the Convention's proceedings. This rule barred any motion for adjournment and left that power for the Convention president to utilize at 4 pm. However, on 24 August, the Journal notes that this rule was amended, and the time for adjournment wa
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Place, Time, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Time, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
To adjourn Ayes — 4; noes — 6. Editors' note: This motion may have been out of order, though the Convention clearly allowed it. On 18 August Rutledge's motion to regulate the meeting times and adjournments of the Convention passed, setting a new rule for the Convention's proceedings. This rule barred any motion for adjournment and left that power for the Convention president to utilize at 4 pm. However, on 24 August, the Journal notes that this rule was amended, and the time for adjournment wa
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Time, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Third Proposition
Also tagged as: President
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause
Mr. Gorham disapproved of making the next highest after the President, the vice-President, without referring the decision to the Senate in case the next highest should have less than a majority of votes. as the regulation stands a very obscure man with very few votes may arrive at that appointment Mr Sherman said the object of this clause of the report of the Committee was to get rid of the ineligibility, which was attached to the mode of election by the Legislature, & to render the Executive
Mr. Gorham disapproved of making the next highest after the President, the vice-President, without referring the decision to the Senate in case the next highest should have less than a majority of votes. as the regulation stands a very obscure man with very few votes may arrive at that appointment Mr Sherman said the object of this clause of the report of the Committee was to get rid of the ineligibility, which was attached to the mode of election by the Legislature, & to render the Executive
Also tagged as: States, Proper, Executive, Regulation, electors, Trial, Public, Least, Give, Majority, Subject, Vote, House, Vice-President, Case, Objections, Made, Supreme, Government, Appointment, Number, Judges, Stated, Impeachment, Senate, Legislature, Given, Necessary, Court, President, Whole, Time, Chosen, Union, Appointed, List, Votes, First
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Adjournment, Time, President, Meeting, Vote, Proceedings, Times, New, Place, Journal, Make
To adjourn Ayes — 11; noes — 0. Editors' note: Is is likely that this motion was proposed before the usual adjournment time called by the President. This motion may have been out of order, though the Convention clearly allowed it. On 18 August Rutledge's motion to regulate the meeting times and adjournments of the Convention passed, setting a new rule for the Convention's proceedings. This rule barred any motion for adjournment and left that power for the Convention president to utilize at 4 pm
Also tagged as: Adjourn, Make, Adjournment, Times, President, Proceedings, Time, Place, Vote, Journal, Meeting, New
The Report made yesterday as to the appointment of the Executive being then taken up. Mr. Pinkney renewed his opposition to the mode, arguing 1. that the electors will not have sufficient knowledge of the fittest men, & will be swayed by an attachment to the eminent men of their respective States — Hence 2dly the dispersion of the votes would leave the appointment with the Senate, and as the President’s reappointment will thus depend on the Senate he will be the mere creature of that body. 3. He
Col. Mason admitted that there were objections to an appointment by the Legislature as originally planned. He had not yet made up his mind; but would state his objections to the mode proposed by the Committee. 1. It puts the appointment in fact into the hands of the Senate, as it will rarely happen that a majority of the whole votes will fall on any one candidate: and as the Existing President will always be one of the 5 highest, his re-appointment will of course depend on the Senate. 2. Conside
Mr Madison considered it as a primary object to render an eventual resort to any part of the Legislature improbable. He was apprehensive that the proposed alteration would turn the attention of the large States too much to the appointment of candidates, instead of aiming at an effectual appointment of the officer, as the large States would predominate in the Legislature which would have the final choice out of the Candidates. Whereas if the Senate in which the small States predominate should hav
The Report made yesterday as to the appointment of the Executive being then taken up. Mr. Pinkney renewed his opposition to the mode, arguing 1. that the electors will not have sufficient knowledge of the fittest men, & will be swayed by an attachment to the eminent men of their respective States — Hence 2dly the dispersion of the votes would leave the appointment with the Senate, and as the President’s reappointment will thus depend on the Senate he will be the mere creature of that body. 3. He
Also tagged as: Senate, President, Executive, Appointment, Time, electors, States, Become, Vote, Powers, Votes, Second, Representatives, House, Given, Respective, Made
Rutledge's Amendment for Presidential Election by the Legislature
Also tagged as: Members, Majority, Term, Elected, Whole, Power, Time, Appointment, Present, Office, Second, Take, Journal, Years, Votes, Senate, Legislature
Mason's Amendment for President Chosen by Highest Vote of Electors
Also tagged as: Senate, President, Majority, Appointment, electors, Votes, Objections, Number, Legislature, Vote, Powers, Made, Removed, Happen, Whole, State, Constitution, Chosen
Mr. Govr Morris thought the point of less consequence than it was supposed on both sides. It is probable that a majority of the votes will fall on the same man, As each elector is to give two votes, more than ¼ will give a majority. Besides as one vote is to be given to a man out of the State, and as this vote will not be thrown away, ½ the votes will fall on characters eminent & generally known. Again if the President shall have given satisfaction, the votes will turn on him of course, and a ma
Also tagged as: Given, States, Majority, New, Think, President, State, Consequence, Vote, Give, Take, Votes, Person, Senate, First
Wilson's Amendment for Presidential Election by Legislature in Case of a Tie
Also tagged as: Case, Senate, Legislature
Mr Madison considered it as a primary object to render an eventual resort to any part of the Legislature improbable. He was apprehensive that the proposed alteration would turn the attention of the large States too much to the appointment of candidates, instead of aiming at an effectual appointment of the officer, as the large States would predominate in the Legislature which would have the final choice out of the Candidates. Whereas if the Senate in which the small States predominate should hav
Also tagged as: States, Legislature, Appointment, Senate, President, Powers, First, Make, Made, Officer
Madison's Amendment for Presidential Election to Require a Third of Votes
Also tagged as: Majority, electors, Power, Vote, Votes, Require
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - King/Gerry to Insert Federal Qualifications of Electors
Mr. Gerry proposed, as the President was to be elected by the Senate out of the five highest candidates, that if he should not at the end of his term be re-elected by a majority of the Electors, and no other candidate should have a majority, the eventual election should be made by the Legislature — This he said would relieve the President from his particular dependence on the Senate for his continuance in office. Mr. King liked the idea, as calculated to satisfy particular members & promote u
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Spaight/Williamson for Seven Year Presidential Term
Mr. Gerry proposed, as the President was to be elected by the Senate out of the five highest candidates, that if he should not at the end of his term be re-elected by a majority of the Electors, and no other candidate should have a majority, the eventual election should be made by the Legislature — This he said would relieve the President from his particular dependence on the Senate for his continuance in office. Mr. King liked the idea, as calculated to satisfy particular members & promote u
Also tagged as: Senate, President, Make, Power, Appointment, States, Powers, Appoint, Executive, Treaties, Offices, Office, Different, Votes, Take, Appointments, Legislature, Years, electors, Act, Number, Case, Whole, New, Made, Officers, Majority, Elected, Use, Give, Exercise, Present, Amendments, Judges, Judicial, Government, Vote, Particular, House, Members, Officer, First, Objections, Appointed, Persons, Land, Holding, Promote, Constitution, Foreign
Spaight's Amendment for Seven Year Presidential Terms
Also tagged as: President, Vote, Years, Term
Spaight's Amendment for Six Year Presidential Terms
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Question on Vice President
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Fourth Proposition - Second Clause
Also tagged as: President, electors, question, Appointment, Second, Vote, Provide, Journal, Legislature
Amendment for Senate to Break a Tied President Vote Immediately
Also tagged as: Senate, Choose, Vote, President
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Fourth Proposition - Seventh Clause
Also tagged as: President, Choosing
Amendment to Clarify the Role of Electors in Choosing the Vice President
Also tagged as: electors, President, Choosing, Votes
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause Referring the Eventual Appointment of the President to the Senate Removed
From Madison's Notes: "Question on the clause referring the eventual appointment of the President to the Senate." Editors' note: Since this clause is already part of the text of the Remaining Parts amendment, the vote to approve it will be represented by an amendment to remove the text, a vote to approve its being removed, an amendment to reinsert the text, and a vote to approve the reinsertion.
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause Referring the Eventual Appointment of the President to the Senate Reinserted
On a question on the clause referring the eventual appointment of the President to the Senate N— H— ay. Mas. ay. Ct. ay. N. J. ay. Pa ay. Del— ay— Va ay. N. C. no Here the call ceased. Editors' note: Farrand suspects that this stand-alone vote in the Journal, "[ Ayes — 10; noes — 1]", belongs to this question. Therefore, this account of the vote will be followed here.
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Madison/Pinckney for Two-Thirds of Senators Present
Mr. Gorham thought it a wrong principle to require more than a majority in any case. In the present case it might prevent for a long time any choice of a President.
On a question on the clause referring the eventual appointment of the President to the Senate N— H— ay. Mas. ay. Ct. ay. N. J. ay. Pa ay. Del— ay— Va ay. N. C. no Here the call ceased. Editors' note: The editors have referred to this clause as the fifth clause of the Fourth Proposition. Madison writes that 'the call [for votes] ceased'. However, Farrand notes that one of the votes Jackson records on the Detail of Ayes and Noes is likely the same vote, though Jackson records a full vote count. F
Also tagged as: Vote, President, Senate, Journal, Appointment, question
Madison's Amendment For Two Thirds of Senate to be Present When Counting Votes
Also tagged as: Senate, Present, Journal, House, Least, Made, Whole, Provided, Number, Representatives, Senators, Votes
Mr. Williamson suggested as better than an eventual choice by the Senate, that this choice should be made by the Legislature, voting by States and not per capita. Mr. Sherman suggested the House of Reps. as preferable to “the Legislature”, and moved, accordingly, To strike out the words “The Senate shall immediately choose &c.” and insert “The House of Representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President, the members from each State having one vote.”
Mr. Gorham thought it a wrong principle to require more than a majority in any case. In the present case it might prevent for a long time any choice of a President
Also tagged as: Case, President, Require, Majority, Time, Present
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Sherman to Replace Senate with House of Representatives
It was moved and seconded to strike out the words “The Senate shall immediately choose by ballot” &ca and to insert the words “The House of representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President, the Members from each State having one vote” which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 10; noes — 1.] Editors' note: Massachusetts has returned, bringing the number of voting delegations to eleven.
Sherman's Amendment for the House of Representatives to Decide on President in Case of a Tie
Also tagged as: House, President, Choose, Representatives, Case, Senate, Legislature, Members, Journal, State
Mr. Govr Morris suggested the idea of providing that in all cases, the President in office, should not be one of the five Candidates; but be only re-eligible in case a majority of the electors should vote for him— (This was another expedient for rendering the President independent of the Legislative body for his continuance in office) Mr. Madison remarked that as a majority of members wd. make a quorum in the H— of Reps. it would follow from the amendment of Mr Sherman giving the election to
It was moved and seconded to strike out the words “The Senate shall immediately choose by ballot” &ca and to insert the words “The House of representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President, the Members from each State having one vote” which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 10; noes — 1.]
Also tagged as: Choose, President, Vote, House, State, Senate, Members, Representatives
Mr. Govr Morris suggested the idea of providing that in all cases, the President in office, should not be one of the five Candidates; but be only re-eligible in case a majority of the electors should vote for him— (This was another expedient for rendering the President independent of the Legislative body for his continuance in office) Mr. Madison remarked that as a majority of members wd. make a quorum in the H— of Reps. it would follow from the amendment of Mr Sherman giving the election to
Also tagged as: Members, Cases, Make, States, Majority, Elected, President, electors, Present, Vote, Office, Case
Amendment for House of Representatives to Decide on Inconclusive Presidential Vote by Electors
Also tagged as: House, Vote, electors, Made, Senate, President, Votes, Case, Cases, Representatives, Make, Majority, Journal, Removed, Different, Amendments, Day, First, Use, Present, Time, Second, Whole, Presented
King's Amendment for Two Thirds of States and a Majority of the House of Representatives to be a Quorum When Choosing a President
Also tagged as: Members, States, Majority, Member, President, Representatives, Whole, Consist, House, Choosing, Number
King's Amendment for Members from Two Thirds of States to be a Quorum When Choosing a President
Also tagged as: States, Members, President, Choosing, Member, Consist
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause on Vice President Removed
King's Amendment for a Majority of the House of Representatives to be a Quorum When Choosing a President
Also tagged as: House, Majority, Representatives, President, question, Choosing, Number, Whole
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause on Vice President Reinserted
Secretary's Redraft
Also tagged as: Made, Day, Congress, Times, Sect, President, electors, Representatives, Direct, Present, Amendments, Take, Journal, House, Choosing, Senate, Several, First
The several amendments being agreed to, on separate questions, The first sect. of the report is as follows. Editors' note: At the end of the session, the Journal and Madison record the Fourth Proposition as it then stood. Both versions differ in both minor and significant ways from the document as amended during the session. One way of accounting for these changes is the possibility that Jackson had been tasked to draw up a fair copy, following the, at times, confusing series of amendments mad
Also tagged as: Made, Day, Times, Sect, President, Representatives, Vote, House, Journal, Amendments, Choosing, Take, Several, First
The several amendments being agreed to, on separate questions, The first sect. of the report is as follows. “He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and together with the Vice President, chosen for the same term, be elected in the following manner. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as it’s legislature may direct, a number of Electors equal to the whole number of Senators and Members of the House of representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Legislat
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Randolph on Acting Presidents
Randolph's Amendment for Congress to Have Power to Choose Acting President
Also tagged as: President, Journal, Act, Officer, Time, Case, Legislature, First, Choose, Congress, Vice-President, Resignation, Law, Made, Executive, Power
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Randolph on Acting Presidents: Madison's Amendment
Madison's Amendment Lessening Periods of Acting Presidents
Also tagged as: Elected, Removed, President
Mr. Madison observed that this, as worded, would prevent a supply of the vacancy by an intermediate election of the President, and moved to substitute — “until such disability be removed, or a President shall be elected —” Mr. Governr. Morris 2ded. the motion, which was agreed to. Editors' note: No vote count is provided.
Mr. Madison observed that this, as worded, would prevent a supply of the vacancy by an intermediate election of the President, and moved to substitute — “until such disability be removed, or a President shall be elected —” Mr. Governr. Morris 2ded. the motion, which was agreed to. Editors' note: None of the sources provides a vote count.
Also tagged as: President, Elected, Removed, Vote
It was moved and seconded to insert the following clause after the words “throughout the United States” in the first sect. of the report. “The Legislature may declare by law what officer of the United States shall act as President in case of the death, resignation, or disability of the President and Vice President; and such Officer shall act accordingly, until such disability be removed, or a President shall be elected” which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 4; divided — 1.]
It was moved and seconded to insert the following clause after the words “throughout the United States” in the first sect. of the report. “The Legislature may declare by law what officer of the United States shall act as President in case of the death, resignation, or disability of the President and Vice President; and such Officer shall act accordingly, until such disability be removed, or a President shall be elected” which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 4; divided — 1.]
Also tagged as: Removed, States, Officer, Sect, United, President, Elected, Resignation, Act, Law, Case, Legislature, First
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Gerry's Amendment on Attendance for Election by the House
Gerry's Amendment on Quorum Required for House of Representatives to Break Tied Presidential Vote
Also tagged as: Members, Necessary, Made, Make, States, Majority, Senators, Representatives, President, State, Vote, House, Number, Concurrence
Gerry's Amendment for a Majority of States in the House of Representatives to Choose a President in a Tie Break
Also tagged as: Members, Necessary, Make, States, Majority, Member, Sect, President, Representatives, Second, Choose, House, Journal, Concurrence, First
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Qualifications of President
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Vice President to be President of Senate
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Sixth Proposition
Also tagged as: President, Senate, First, Journal
Mr. Gerry opposed this regulation. We might as well put the President himself at the head of the Legislature. The close intimacy that must subsist between the President & vice-president makes it absolutely improper. He was agst. having any vice President. Mr Govr Morris. The vice president then will be the first heir apparent that ever loved his father — If there should be no vice president, the President of the Senate would be temporary successor, which would amount to the same thing. Mr
Mr. Gerry opposed this regulation. We might as well put the President himself at the head of the Legislature. The close intimacy that must subsist between the President & vice-president makes it absolutely improper. He was agst. having any vice President. Mr Govr Morris. The vice president then will be the first heir apparent that ever loved his father — If there should be no vice president, the President of the Senate would be temporary successor, which would amount to the same thing. Mr
Also tagged as: President, Senate, Vice-President, Legislature, Chosen, Power, Office, Time, Regulation, Vote, Union, Votes, Member, Years, Case, Thing, Appointment, Make, Made, Appointments, Concurrence, Equal, Happen, Officers, Members, Treaties, Second, Ambassadors, Executive, Officer
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Role of the Vice President
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Sixth Proposition - Second Clause
Also tagged as: Officer, Sect, President, Second, Vote, Journal, Impeachment, Several
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Treaties
Separate questions having been taken on the several clauses of the 3rd sect. of the report They passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Neither the Journal nor Madison stipulates how these clauses were separated. Madison writes that 'the other parts of the same 〈Section〉 (3) were then agreed to.' Without further guidance, the editors have suggested that there were three clauses, the first detailing the presiding officer during impeachment trials, the second describing the selection of a Pres
Also tagged as: Officer, Sect, President, Second, Vote, Journal, Impeachment, Several
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Treaties - Wilson for Advice and Consent of House
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Sixth Proposition - Third Clause
Also tagged as: Officer, Sect, President, Second, Vote, Journal, Impeachment, Several
Separate questions having been taken on the several clauses of the 3rd sect. of the report They passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Neither the Journal nor Madison stipulates how these clauses were separated. Madison writes that 'the other parts of the same 〈Section〉 (3) were then agreed to.' Without further guidance, the editors have suggested that there were three clauses, the first detailing the presiding officer during impeachment trials, the second describing the selection of a Pres
Also tagged as: Vote, President, Journal, Second, Officer, Sect, Impeachment, Several
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Sixth Proposition - Fourth Clause
Also tagged as: Officer, Sect, President, Second, Vote, Journal, Impeachment, Several
Separate questions having been taken on the several clauses of the 3rd sect. of the report They passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Neither the Journal nor Madison stipulates how these clauses were separated. Madison writes that 'the other parts of the same 〈Section〉 (3) were then agreed to.' Without further guidance, the editors have suggested that there were three clauses, the first detailing the presiding officer during impeachment trials, the second describing the selection of a Pres
Also tagged as: Vote, President, Journal, Second, Officer, Sect, Impeachment, Several
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Ambassadors and Public Ministers
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Ambassadors and Foreign Ministers
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Seventh Proposition
Also tagged as: President, Consent, Senate, First, Treaties, Make, Journal, Power
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Seventh Proposition - First Clause
Also tagged as: President, Consent, Senate, First, Treaties, Make, Journal, Power
Mr. Wilson objected to the mode of appointing, as blending a branch of the Legislature with the Executive. Good laws are of no effect without a good Executive; and there can be no good Executive without a responsible appointment of officers to execute. Responsibility is in a manner destroyed by such an agency of the Senate — He would prefer the Council proposed by Col: Mason, provided its advice should not be made obligatory on the President Mr. Pinkney was against joining the Senate in these
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Ambassadors and Public Ministers
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Supreme Court Judges
Mr. Wilson objected to the mode of appointing, as blending a branch of the Legislature with the Executive. Good laws are of no effect without a good Executive; and there can be no good Executive without a responsible appointment of officers to execute. Responsibility is in a manner destroyed by such an agency of the Senate — He would prefer the Council proposed by Col: Mason, provided its advice should not be made obligatory on the President Mr. Pinkney was against joining the Senate in these
Also tagged as: Senate, President, Officers, Executive, Appointments, Appointed, Provided, Congress, Offices, Legislature, New, Government, Laws, Appointment, Make, Made, Ambassadors
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Other Officers
Col: Mason said that in rejecting a Council to the President we were about to try an experiment on which the most despotic Governments had never ventured— The Grand Signor himself had his Divan. He moved to postpone the consideration of the clause in order to take up the following “That it be an instruction to the Committee of the States to prepare a clause or clauses for establishing an Executive Council, as a Council of State for the President of the U. States, to consist of six members, tw
Motion to postpone in order to create an executive council.
Mr. Govr. Morris. The question of a Council was considered in the Committee, where it was judged that the Presidt. by persuading his Council— to concur in his wrong measures, would acquire their protection for them— Mr. Wilson approved of a Council, in preference to making the Senate a party to appointmts. Mr. Dickinson was for a Council. It wd. be a singular thing if the measures of the Executive were not to undergo some previous discussion before the President Mr Madison was in favor
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Spaight's Motion on Vacancies
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following clause That the President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of the next session of the Senate. which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes "nem. con.".
Instruction to Devise a Proposition for an Executive Council
Also tagged as: Members, States, Sect, Executive, President, United, State, Consist, Appointed, Take, Journal, Office, Senate, Legislature
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties
Spaight's Amendment for Presidential Power on Interim Appointments
Also tagged as: Happen, President, Power, Vacancies, Fill, Journal, Senate, Appointments
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Madison to Insert "Except Treaties of Peace"
On motion of Mr. Spaight — “that the President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate by granting Commissions which shall expire at the end of the next Session of the Senate” It was agreed to nem: con:
Also tagged as: Senate, President, Happen, Vacancies, Fill, Power
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Seventh Proposition - Fifth Clause
Also tagged as: Consent, President, Treaties, House, Senate, Make, Present, Made, Members, Power
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Madison on Peace Treaties
Mr Gorham thought the precaution unnecessary as the means of carrying on the war would not be in the hands of the President, but of the Legislature. Mr. Govr Morris thought the power of the President in this case harmless; and that no peace ought to be made without the concurrence of the President, who was the general Guardian of the National interests. Mr. Butler was strenuous for the motion, as a necessary security against ambitious & corrupt Presidents. He mentioned the late perfidious
Madison's Amendment for Two Thirds of the Senate to Make Peace Without the Consent of the President
Also tagged as: Make, War, President, Power, Treaties, State, Consent, Provide, Journal, Concurrence, Peace, Senate
To agree to the last question Ayes — 11; noes — 0. Editors' note: Madison writes, "On the question, “authorizing the President to call for the opinions of the Heads of Departments, in writing:” it passed in the affirmative, N. H. only being no. The clause was then unanimously agreed to." New Hampshire's vote will be recorded as uncertain, it being unclear whether two votes were taken.
Mr Gorham thought the precaution unnecessary as the means of carrying on the war would not be in the hands of the President, but of the Legislature. Mr. Govr Morris thought the power of the President in this case harmless; and that no peace ought to be made without the concurrence of the President, who was the general Guardian of the National interests. Mr. Butler was strenuous for the motion, as a necessary security against ambitious & corrupt Presidents. He mentioned the late perfidious
Also tagged as: Made, Necessary, War, President, Power, Least, Treaties, Concurrence, Votes, Case, Peace, Legislature
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Williamson/Spaight on Territorial Rights
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Williamson/Spaight on Territorial Rights: King's Amendment
Instruction to Devise a Proposition for an Executive Council
Also tagged as: President, States, Appointed, Senate, Executive, Legislature, Number, Persons, Appointment, Appointments, Office, State, Consist, Members, Take
Mr. Govr. Morris. The question of a Council was considered in the Committee, where it was judged that the Presidt. by persuading his Council— to concur in his wrong measures, would acquire their protection for them— Mr. Wilson approved of a Council, in preference to making the Senate a party to appointmts. Mr. Dickinson was for a Council. It wd. be a singular thing if the measures of the Executive were not to undergo some previous discussion before the President Mr Madison was in favor
Also tagged as: Executive, Senate, Thing, Party, question, President
It was moved and seconded to postpone the consideration of the 4 sect. of the report in order to take up the following. That it be an instruction to the Committee of the States to prepare a clause or clauses for establishing an Executive Council, as a Council of State, for the President of the United States, to consist of six Members, two of which from the Eastern, two from the middle, and two from the southern States with a rotation and duration of office similar to that of the Senate; such Co
Also tagged as: Members, States, Sect, Executive, United, President, question, State, Consist, Appointed, Vote, Take, Journal, Office, Senate, Legislature
On the question, “authorizing the President to call for the opinions of the Heads of Departments, in writing:” it passed in the affirmative, N. H. only being no.* 〈The clause was then unanimously agreed to.〉 *〈Not so stated in the Printed Journal; but comformable to the result afterwards appearing. passed in the〉 Editors' note: The Journal records a unanimous final vote of the day, 'To agree to the last question'. Madison's notes present an unclear picture of this event, but it is probable tha
Also tagged as: Vote, Journal, question, President, Stated, Present, New, Day
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - King's Motion to Strike Out "Except Treaties of Peace"
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Rutledge and Gerry's Amendment
Mr. Ghorum. There is a difference in the case, as the President’s consent will also be necessary in the new Govt.
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Sherman for Majority of Senate
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Madison's Amendment
Mr. Ghorum. There is a difference in the case, as the President’s consent will also be necessary in the new Govt.
Also tagged as: New, Consent, President, Necessary, Case
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties: Gerry/Williamson Amendment
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Second Amendment to Section 2
Gerry's Amendment Prohibiting the President from Filling Offices not Created by Law
Also tagged as: Made, Constitution, President, Appointment, Law, Offices
Mr. Madison, objected to a trial of the President by the Senate, especially as he was to be impeached by the other branch of the Legislature, and for any act which might be called a misdemesnor. The President under these circumstances was made improperly dependent. He would prefer the supreme Court for the trial of impeachments, or rather a tribunal of which that should form a part. Mr Govr Morris thought no other tribunal than the Senate could be trusted. The Supreme Court were too few in nu
Second Report of the Committee on Postponed Matters: Ninth Proposition
Also tagged as: President, Trial, Treason, Senate
Mason's Amendment for Presidential Impeachment for Maladministration
Also tagged as: Treason, Necessary, Constitution, Offences, Bills, Power, Impeachment
Mason's Amendment for Presidential Impeachment for High Crimes and Misdemeanors
Also tagged as: Impeachment, Crimes, State
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 2 - VP Added to Impeachment Clause
It was moved and seconded to add the following clause after the words “United States” “The Vice President and other civil Officers of the United States shall be removed from Office on impeachment and conviction as aforesaid” which passed in the affirmative [“unanimous”]
Mr. Madison, objected to a trial of the President by the Senate, especially as he was to be impeached by the other branch of the Legislature, and for any act which might be called a misdemesnor. The President under these circumstances was made improperly dependent. He would prefer the supreme Court for the trial of impeachments, or rather a tribunal of which that should form a part. Mr Govr Morris thought no other tribunal than the Senate could be trusted. The Supreme Court were too few in numb
Also tagged as: Made, Supreme, Houses, Cases, Law, Crimes, Court, Executive, President, Trial, Act, Office, Appointed, Number, Years, Judges, Senate, Legislature
Amendment on Impeachment of Vice President and Other Government Officers
Also tagged as: President, Officers, Impeachment, States, United, Government, Office, Removed
It was moved and seconded to add the following clause after the words “United States” “The Vice President and other civil Officers of the United States shall be removed from Office on impeachment and conviction as aforesaid” which passed in the affirmative [“unanimous”]
Also tagged as: Removed, States, United, President, Officers, Office, Impeachment
Mr. McHenry observed that the President had not yet been any where authorized to convene the Senate, and moved to amend Art X. sect. 2. by striking out the words “He may convene them (the Legislature) on extraordinary occasions” & insert “He may convene both or either of the Houses on extraordinary occasions” — This he added would also provide for the case of the Senate being in Session at the time of convening the Legislature. Mr. Wilson said he should vote agst the motion because it implied
Mr. Sherman opposed it— he thought the provision on that subject amply sufficient. Col: Hamilton expressed himself with great earnestness and anxiety in favor of the motion. He avowed himself a friend to a vigorous Government, but would declare at the same time, that he held it essential that the popular branch of it should be on a broad foundation. He was seriously of opinion that the House of Representatives was on so narrow a scale as to be really dangerous, and to warrant a jealousy in th
McHenry's Amendment to Clarify President's Role in Convening Extraordinary Sessions of Congress
Also tagged as: Houses, Congress, Sect, President, Time, Provide, Case, Senate, Legislature
Mr. Sherman opposed it— he thought the provision on that subject amply sufficient. Col: Hamilton expressed himself with great earnestness and anxiety in favor of the motion. He avowed himself a friend to a vigorous Government, but would declare at the same time, that he held it essential that the popular branch of it should be on a broad foundation. He was seriously of opinion that the House of Representatives was on so narrow a scale as to be really dangerous, and to warrant a jealousy in the
Also tagged as: Necessary, President, Representatives, Government, Time, Subject, House, Senate, Legislature
Randolph's Amendment on Ratification of the Constitution
Also tagged as: States, Authority, Proper, Executive, Particular, Duties, Journal, Establish, Exports, Power, House, Laws, Representative, Case, Objections, Made, Removed, Lay, Constitution, Judgment, Number, Impeachment, Senate, Legislature, Necessary, Acts, According, Court, President, State, Act, Legislatures
Randolph's Resolution on Ratification
Draft Letter to Congress
Also tagged as: Congress, President, Places, New, Journal, Constitution, State
Mr. Williamson moved to reconsider the clause requiring three fourths of each House to overrule the negative of the President, in order to strike out ¾ and insert ⅔. He had he remarked himself proposed ¾ instead of ⅔, but he had since been convinced that the latter proportion was the best. The former puts too much in the power of the President. Mr. Sherman was of the same opinion; adding that the States would not like to see so small a minority and the President, prevailing over the general v
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Williamson for Two Thirds Consent to Override Presidential Veto
Reconsider Article VI: Section 13 (Presidential Approval)
Also tagged as: President, House, Power
Williamson's Amendment for a Two Thirds Majority to Overturn Presidential Veto
Also tagged as: President, House, Majority, Sect, Power
Mr. Sherman was of the same opinion; adding that the States would not like to see so small a minority and the President, prevailing over the general voice. In making laws regard should be had to the sense of the people. who are to be bound by them, and it was more probable that a single man should mistake or betray this sense than the Legislature Mr Govr Morris. Considering the difference between the two proportions numerically, it amounts in one House to two members only; and in the other to n
Also tagged as: States, Proper, Executive, Public, Years, Members, Term, Bound, Power, House, Office, Laws, Case, Vice-President, Cases, Senators, Take, Require, Legislature, Offices, Necessary, Given, According, Elected, President, Whole, Place, State, Consent, New, First
Report on Ratification and Enactment of Constitution
Also tagged as: States, President, Congress, Constitution, electors, United, Senators, Day, Time, Place, Representatives, Appointed, Votes, Chosen, Elected, Directed, Proceedings, Legislature, Vote, Appoint, State, Give, Senate, Laid
Williamson's Amendment for a Two Thirds Majority to Overturn Presidential Veto
Also tagged as: Places, Made, Majority, House, Journal
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 7 - Madison to Insert "The Day on Which"
Jackson writes in the Journal, 'It was moved and seconded to proceed to the comparing of the report, from the Committee of revision, with the articles which were agreed to by the House... and the same was read by paragraphs, compared, and in some places corrected and amended.' One of the differences found on comparison was in Article I: Section 7, regarding overruling a presidential veto. Williamson successfully made changes regarding the majorities needed in the Report of the Committee of Deta
Also tagged as: Places, Made, House, Journal
Madison's Amendment to Insert 'The Day on Which'
Also tagged as: Presented, Day, Sect, Bill, President, question, Days, Ten
Mason's Amendment on Choosing the Vice President
Also tagged as: United, States, Vice-President, President, Choosing, Directed, Chosen
In the beginning of the 4th clause of the 3rd section of the 1st Article, strike out the words — the vice-president of the United States, and instead of them insert — a vice-president of the United States shall be chosen in the manner hereinafter directed who Refused
Also tagged as: Chosen, United, States, Directed, Vice-President
Mr. Madison — The President is made too dependent already on the Legislature, by the power of one branch to try him in consequence of an impeachment by the other. This intermediate suspension, will put him in the power of one branch only — They can at any moment, in order to make way for the functions of another who will be more favorable to their views, vote a temporary removal of the existing magistrate — Mr. King concurred in the opposition to the amendment.
Mr. Madison — The President is made too dependent already on the Legislature, by the power of one branch to try him in consequence of an impeachment by the other. This intermediate suspension, will put him in the power of one branch only — They can at any moment, in order to make way for the functions of another who will be more favorable to their views, vote a temporary removal of the existing magistrate — Mr. King 〈concurred〉 in the opposition to the amendment
Also tagged as: Power, President, Legislature, Impeachment, Vote, Make, Made, Removal, Consequence
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 1 - Sixth Clause
Article II: Section 1 (President)
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 1 - Seventh Clause: Rutledge/Franklin Amendment
Mr. Rutlidge and Docr Franklin moved to annex to the end paragraph 7. sect. 1. art II— “and he (the President) shall not receive, within that period, any other emolument from the U. S. or any of them.” on which question N— H. ay— Mas. ay. Ct. no. N. J. no. Pa ay. Del. no. Md. ay— Va. ay. N. C. no. S— C. ay. Geo— ay. [Ayes — 7; noes — 4.]
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 2 - Randolph to Prohibit Pardon in Cases of Treason
Mr Govr Morris had rather there should be no pardon for treason, than let the power devolve on the Legislature. Mr Wilson. Pardon is necessary for cases of treason, and is best placed in the hands of the Executive. If he be himself a party to the guilt he can be impeached and prosecuted. Mr. King thought it would be inconsistent with the Constitutional separation of the Executive & Legislative powers to let the prerogative be exercised by the latter — A Legislative body is utterly unfit fo
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 2 - Second Clause: Morris/Sherman's Amendment
In the latter end of the 3rd clause of the 2nd Article — enquire of the committee about the senate chusing the vice president Editors' note: This excerpt from Mason's notes suggests that he either asked the Committee members to clarify their reasoning or attempted to pass a motion that they report their reasoning formally. Although, it is unclear which, if any, of these actions he took, as there are no corroborating sources.
Also tagged as: Members, President, Senate
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 1 - Third Clause: Journal Amendments
Amendment Lessening Periods of Acting Presidents
Also tagged as: Made, Day, Elected, Sect, President, Vote, Period
Art II. sect. 1. (paragraph 6) “or the period for chusing another president arrive” was changed into “or a President 〈shall〉 be elected” comformably to a vote of the ____ day of ____
Also tagged as: Day, Sect, Elected, President, Vote, Period
Amendment Redrafting Article II: Section 1 - Clause 7 (Presidential Compensation)
Also tagged as: Services, Receive, Journal, Amendments, Compensation, Several, Place, Made, Constitution
Report of the Committee of Style - Presidential Oath of Office: Journal Amendment
Mason's Amendment on Fixing Presidential Compensation
Also tagged as: Elected, Propose, Time, Compensation, Office, Period, Place, Person
Rutledge's Amendment Prohibiting Presidential Emoluments
Also tagged as: President, Period, Sect, Receive
Mr. Rutlidge and Docr Franklin moved to annex to the end paragraph 7. sect. 1. art II— “and he (the President) shall not receive, within that period, any other emolument from the U. S. or any of them.” on which question N— H. ay— Mas. ay. Ct. no. N. J. no. Pa ay. Del. no. Md. ay— Va. ay. N. C. no. S— C. ay. Geo— ay. [Ayes — 7; noes — 4.]
Also tagged as: President, Sect, Period, question, Receive
Amendment Removing Requirement for President's Name within Oath
Also tagged as: President, Made, Place, Journal, Amendments, Constitution
Amendment to Replace 'Judgement and Power' with 'Abilities'
Also tagged as: Constitution, Journal, Amendments, Power, President, Time, Several, Judgment, Place, Made
In the oath to be taken by the president, strike out the word “judgment,” and insert “abilities.” Editors' note: Farrand writes that Adams' 1819 version of the Journal includes several amendments 'which may have been taken from the interlineations of the Brearley copy or may have been supplied by Madison'. Though this event represents the changes made to the Report of the Committee of Style and Arrangement, the order in which these amendments took place is unknown. As a result, the editors have
Also tagged as: Made, Constitution, President, Power, Time, Place, Judgment, Vote, Journal, Amendments, Several
Article II: Section 2 (Presidential Powers)
Amendment Stipulating Presidential Command of the Militia Only When Called into Service
Also tagged as: Several, Militia, Service, Journal, Amendments, Second, Time, States, First, United, Place, Made, Constitution
Randolph's Amendment to Prohibit Presidential Pardon for Treason
Also tagged as: Treason, Cases, Congress, Sect, President, Offences, Power, Trust, Grant
Mr Govr Morris had rather there should be no pardon for treason, than let the power devolve on the Legislature. Mr Wilson. Pardon is necessary for cases of treason, and is best placed in the hands of the Executive. If he be himself a party to the guilt he can be impeached and prosecuted. Mr. King thought it would be inconsistent with the Constitutional separation of the Executive & Legislative powers to let the prerogative be exercised by the latter — A Legislative body is utterly unfit for th
Also tagged as: Treason, Cases, Houses, Necessary, Acts, Lay, Powers, Executive, President, Power, State, Require, Objections, Concurrence, Senate, Legislature, Party
Morris's Amendment Allowing Congress to Delegate Appointments
Also tagged as: Congress, Law, Appointments, Sect, Appointment, Think, Inferior, Proper, Officers, Courts, President
Article II: Section 3 (Presidential Responsibilities)
Also tagged as: Vote, Make, Amendments, Journal
Mr. Pinkney. These declarations from members so respectable at the close of this important scene, give a peculiar solemnity to the present moment. He descanted on the consequences of calling forth the deliberations & amendments of the different States on the subject of Government at large. Nothing but confusion & contrariety could spring from the experiment. The States will never agree in their plans— And the Deputies to a second Convention coming together under the discordant impressions of the
Mr. Pinkney. These declarations from members so respectable at the close of this important scene, give a peculiar solemnity to the present moment. He descanted on the consequences of calling forth the deliberations & amendments of the different States on the subject of Government at large. Nothing but confusion & contrariety could spring from the experiment. The States will never agree in their plans— And the Deputies to a second Convention coming together under the discordant impressions of the
Also tagged as: States, Proper, Executive, Representatives, Present, Give, Establish, Places, Members, Majority, Different, Power, Second, Subject, House, Laws, Amendments, Objections, Made, Cases, Constitution, Government, Stated, Senate, Legislature, Citizens, Necessary, Congress, Make, Money, President, Provide
Editors' note: Jacob Shallus was chosen for the task of engrossing the Constitution and was paid $30 for the work. Shallus was Assistant Clerk to the Pennsylvania General Assembly, which met at the Pennsylvania State House, the same building used by the Convention. Once Shallus had produced the document, he attended the next session to make any changes the Convention requested.
Also tagged as: Chosen, President, House, State, Constitution, Vote, Make, Present
There is no Declaration of Rights, and the laws of the general government being paramount to the laws and constitution of the several States, the Declaration of Rights in the separate States are no security. Nor are the people secured even in the enjoyment of the benefit of the common law. In the House of Representatives there is not the substance but the shadow only of representation; which can never produce proper information in the legislature, or inspire confidence in the people; the laws
Docr. Franklin rose with a speech in his hand, which he had reduced to writing for his own conveniency, and which Mr. Wilson read in the words following. Mr. President I confess that there are several parts of this constitution which I do not at present approve, but I am not sure I shall never approve them: For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged by better information or fuller consideration, to change opinions even on important subjects, which I once thou
Docr. Franklin rose with a speech in his hand, which he had reduced to writing for his own conveniency, and which Mr. Wilson read in the words following. “Mr. President I confess that there are several parts of this constitution which I do not at present approve, but I am not sure I shall never approve them: For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged by better information or fuller consideration, to change opinions even on important subjects, which I once thought
Also tagged as: States, Think, Public, Present, Years, Member, Objections, Become, Foreign, Sect, Constitution, Government, Judgment, Number, Necessary, Make, Congress, President, Whole, Act, Nations, Persons, Several
When the President rose, for the purpose of putting the question, he said that although his situation had hitherto restrained him from offering his sentiments on questions depending in the House, and it might be thought, ought now to impose silence on him, yet he could not forbear expressing his wish that the alteration proposed might take place. It was much to be desired that the objections to the plan recommended might be made as few as possible — The smallness of the proportion of Representat
When the President rose, for the purpose of putting the question, he said that although his situation had hitherto restrained him from offering his sentiments on questions depending in the House, and it might be thought, ought now to impose silence on him, yet he could not forbear expressing his wish that the alteration proposed might take place. It was much to be desired that the objections to the plan recommended might be made as few as possible — The smallness of the proportion of Representat
Also tagged as: Members, Made, Entered, President, Representatives, question, Place, Present, Consequence, Give, House, Take, Amendments, Objections
Motion to deposit the Journals and papers with the President.
A question was then put on depositing the Journals and other papers of the Convention in the hands of the President, On which, N— H— ay. Mtts ay. Ct. ay— N. J. ay. Pena. ay. Del. ay. Md. no. Va. ay. N. C. ay— S. C. ay. Geo. ay. [Ayes 10; noes — 1.] Editors' note: Madison notes that 'This negative of Maryland was occasioned by the language of the instructions to the Deputies of that State, which required them to report to the State, the proceedings of the Convention.'
Resolution that the President retain the Journal.
Editors' note: Scribe Jacob Shallus made a number of corrections to his engrossed copy of the Constitution. As the Convention granted him only Sunday to write out the Constitution, there are several omissions in the text due to the difficult and hurried nature of the task. He corrected these omissions by adding interlineations, most likely prior to delivering the document to the Convention. It seems that Shallus was present during the final session, as Gorham’s amendment and the subscription te
Also tagged as: Constitution, Second, Judgment, Several, Made, Given, President
Deposit the Journal and Papers with the President
Also tagged as: President, Made, Public, Time, Journal, question, Use, Second
A question was then put on depositing the Journals and other papers of the Convention in the hands of the President, On which, N— H— ay. Mtts ay. Ct. ay— N. J. ay. Pena. ay. Del. ay. Md.* no. Va. ay. N. C. ay— S. C. ay. Geo. ay. [Ayes 10; noes — 1.] * This negative of Maryland was occasioned by the language of the instructions to the Deputies of that State, which required them to report to the State, the proceedings of the Convention.
Also tagged as: President, question, Proceedings, State
President to Retain the Journal and Papers
Also tagged as: Members, Congress, Constitution, President, Subject, Journal
The President having asked what the Convention meant should be done with the Journals &c, whether copies were to be allowed to the members if applied for. It was Resolved nem: con: "that he retain the Journal and other papers, subject to the order of Congress, if ever formed under the Constitution."
Also tagged as: President, Congress, Members, Journal, Subject, Constitution
Whilst the last members were signing it Doctr. Franklin looking towards the Presidents Chair, at the back of which a rising sun happened to be painted, observed to a few members near him, that Painters had found it difficult to distinguish in their art a rising from a setting sun. I have, said he, often and often in the course of the Session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that behind the President without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting
Also tagged as: Members, President
Motion to Elect a President pro tempore
Also tagged as: Senate
'The Senate then proceeded by ballot to the choice of a President of their body, pro tempore.'
Also tagged as: Senate
'The Senate then proceeded by ballot to the choice of a President of their body, pro tempore. John Langdon, Esq. was duly elected.'
Also tagged as: Senate
Letter from the Senate - 16 April
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, Taken, Papers, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases, Respecting
'The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Honorable John Langdon, President pro tempore of the Senate, communicating the appointment of two committees of that House, agreeably to the report of the committee of both Houses, agreed to yesterday; which was read, and ordered to lie on the table.'
Also tagged as: Houses, House, Senate
'On motion, Resolved, That the following be subjoined to the standing orders of the Senate: XX. Before any petition or memorial, addressed to the Senate, shall be received and read at the table, whether the same shall be introduced by the President, or a member, a brief statement of the contents of the petition or memorial shall verbally be made by the introducer.'
Also tagged as: Following, Senate, Petition, Resolved
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: United, House, States
'Upon motion of Mr. White, referring to the arrival of the President, the House adjourned until to-tomorrow' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 25 April 1789, 14).
Also tagged as: United, House, States
Implied Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
'This being the day on which the President of the United States was inaugurated no other business, of course, was attended to' (Annals of Congress, 1st. Cong., 1st sess., 241).
Also tagged as: Congress, United, States
Implied Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Resolved, Rights, Following, Adopting
'The honorable Pierce Butler, from the state of South Carolina, appeared, produced his credentials, and took his seat in the Senate. The Vice President administered the oath to Mr. Butler.'
Also tagged as: Oath, State, Senate
Madison's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: Use, Prevent, State, Disparage, Exercise, Freedom, Representative, Confidence, Liberty, Respecting, Time, Proposed, Things, Violated, Fourth, Amendment, Others, States, Establishment, United, Public, Order, Favor, Arising, Abridging, Government, Ratified, Right, Rights, Articles, Number, Fifth, Senate, Taken, Take, Conventions, Value, America, Required, Houses, Persons, Danger, First, Answer, House, Case, Controversy, Certain, Make, Constitution, Amendments, People, Necessary, Ground, Representatives, Legislatures, Court, Subject, Secure, Suits, Thirty, Enumeration, Press, Defence, Criminal, Thousand, Delegated, Security, Compelled, Fact, Best, Common, Retained, Compensation, Place, Purposes, Jury, Trial, Nature, Proportion, Warrants, Obtaining, Cases, Added, Reserved, Law, Congress, Exceed, Effect, Powers, Service, Varying, Several, Part, Put
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
Motion to Appoint the Committee for Enrolled Bills
Also tagged as: Congress
Implied Motion to Appoint a Member to the Committee for Enrolled Bills
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Informed, Houses, Time
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation. Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do acquaint the Senate therewith.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Beckley, their Clerk: who informed the Senate that "the House of Representatives had appointed Mr. White and Mr. Partridge, with such as the Senate may join, a standing committee, to examine the enrollment of all hills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and, after being signed by the President of the Senate, and Speaker of the House of Representatives, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States;" [...] The Senate p
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Informed, Houses, Time
'The Senate proceeded to appoint Mr. Wingate a committee on their part, to examine and present to the President of the United States the enrolled bills that may pass the Senate and House of Representatives from time to time.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Time
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'The Senate proceeded to appoint Mr. Wingate a committee on their part, to examine and present to the President of the United States the enrolled bills that may pass the Senate and House of Representatives from time to time.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Time
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'Mr. LIVERMORE was clearly of opinion, that whatever amendments were made to the constitution, they ought to stand separate from the original instrument. We have no right, said he, to alter a clause, any otherwise than by a new proposition. We have well-established precedents for such a mode of procedure in the practice of the British Parliament and the State Legislatures throughout America. I do not mean, however, to assert that there has been no instance of a repeal of the whole law on enactin
Also tagged as: Defence, Senate, Others, Taken, States, Valid, Take, Conventions, Use, Fact, Best, Retained, Place, Original, Purposes, United, America, Public, Less, State, Order, Houses, Favor, Cases, Exercise, First, Assembled, Law, House, Government, Congress, Oath, Case, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Ratified, Constitution, Powers, Right, Amendments, Respecting, Necessary, People, Time, Ground, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Intents, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Consent, Secure, Subject, Addition, Desire, Preserved, Part, Put, Adopting, Number, Amendment, Fifth, Construed
Mr. TUCKER.—I presume these propositions are brought forward under the idea of being amendments to the constitution; but can this be esteemed an amendment of the constitution? If I understand what is meant by the introductory paragraph, it is the preamble to the constitution; but a preamble is no part of the constitution. It is, to say the best, a useless amendment. For my part, I should as soon think of amending the concluding part, consisting of General Washington's letter to the President of
Also tagged as: Others, Taken, States, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Fact, Best, Place, Original, United, America, State, Exercise, Added, House, Congress, Certain, Constitution, Right, Amendments, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Addition, Desire, Part, Amendment
'The question on the first paragraph of the report was put and carried in the affirmative, twenty-seven to twenty-three' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 746-47). *** 'Some progress was made in the discussion of the report of the select committee.—The question on the first paragraph, after a short debate, was put and carried in the affirmative' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 15 August 1789, 143). *** 'Mr. TUCKER observed, that the preamble is no part of the Const
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, Part, States, Put, Constitution, Right, People, Amendment, Amendments, Original, Necessary
‘Mr. AMES said, that inadequate regulations were equally injurious as having none, and that such an amendment as was now proposed would alter the constitution; it would vest the supreme authority in places where it was never contemplated. Mr. SHERMAN observed, that the Convention were very unanimous in passing this clause; that it was an important provision, and if it was resigned it would tend to subvert the Government. Mr. MADISON was willing to make very amendment that was required by t
Also tagged as: Others, States, Take, Prevent, Senators, United, America, Required, Public, Less, State, Prohibited, Order, Danger, First, Law, House, Government, Congress, Effect, Certain, Make, Powers, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Legislatures, Secure, Subject, Number, Amendment, Election
Additional Proposed Amendment
Also tagged as: United, Person, House, Representatives, Proposed, Following, States, Articles, Constitution, Amendment
'On motion to add the following clause to the articles of amendment to the constitution of the United States, proposed by the House of Representatives, to wit: "That no person shall be capable of being President of the United States for more than eight years in any term of sixteen years:" It passed in the negative.'
Also tagged as: United, Person, House, Representatives, Proposed, Following, States, Articles, Constitution, Amendment
Resolution that President Send Copies of Amendments to the States
Also tagged as: Assembled, Several, United, House, Senate, Congress, Proposed, Resolved, Representatives, States, Ratified, Constitution, Added, Amendments
Motion to Send Copies of Amendments to the States
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Senate, Congress, Proposed, Representatives, States, Informed, Ratified, Constitution, Added, Amendments
'The Senate proceeded to consider the resolve of the House of Representatives of the 24th instant, to wit: "In the House of Representatives, "Thursday, the 24th, September, 1789. "Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be requested to transmit to the executives of the United States, which have ratified the constitution copies of the amendments proposed by Congress, to be added the
Also tagged as: Assembled, United, House, Senate, Congress, Proposed, Resolved, Representatives, States, Ratified, Constitution, Added, Amendments
'Ordered, That the Secretary do carry a message to the House of Representatives accordingly' (U.S. Senate Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 26 September 1789). *** 'A message from the Senate, by Mr. Otis, their Secretary: Mr. Speaker: The Senate have agreed to the resolution desiring the President of the United States to recommend a day of general thanksgiving; also, to the resolution desiring the President of the United States to transmit to the Executives of the several States in the Un
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, States, Constitution, Amendments
[Editor's Note: William A. Wheeler was not included as a member who entered the Senate in the Congressional Journal, but served as Vice President of the United States from 1877 to 1881. He is included as a speaker throughout the record and is referred to as "The VICE-PRESIDENT."]
Appointment of Senators to the Committee to Wait Upon the President of the United States
The VICE-PRESIDENT To which the Chair hears no objection.
Resolution Requesting Advocacy Before the Senate
Mr. SARGENT. I should like to make a remark before it goes over. Mr. BURNSIDE. I hope the Senator from Vermont will yield to my motion. Mr. SARGENT. With the leave of the Senate I should like to make one remark. The ladies referred to in this resolution are here temporarily and leave soon. It seems to me Senators can make up their minds to-day whether they will give them this privilege or not. It is nota matter extremely abstruse. We can easily determine whether we will allow them to be heard be
Notice to Call the Resolution To-morrow
The VICE-PRESIDENT. The resolution is not before the Senate.
The VICE-PRESIDENT. The regular order is a resolution which comes over from the session of December last.
The VICE-PRESIDENT. The Chair will regard the motion to re- consider as entered by the Senator from Rhode Island to come up at the proper time.
Mr. EDMUNDS. We get the substance of the idea. I do not think it is necessary to have it present. The simple proposition is just what it was this morning; and that is that, contrary to the universal practice of the Senate, which has had no exception, I believe, and which stood in the rules until the present occupant of the chair left it out in his last report, as I have just discovered, by the old nineteenth rule which stood from 1792 or 1789 until 1877 it was declared that under no circumstance
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The joint resolution will be placed on the Calendar, with the adverse report of the Committee, which will be printed.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The resolution will be passed over.
Motion to Read Journal of the Previous Day
[William A. Wheeler served as the Vice President of the United States from 1877-1881.]
The VICE-PRESIDENT of the United States (Hon. WILLIAM A. WHEELER, of New York) took the char and called the Senate to order at twelve o'clock noon.
Appointment of Senators to the Committee to Wait Upon the President of the United States
Credentials of James Donald Cameron
Credentials of Benjamin Franklin Jones
The VICE-PRESIDENT. A quorum is now present. The Secretary will read the proceedings of the session of Saturday last. The Secretary resumed and concluded the reading of the Journal of the proceedings of Saturday last.
The VICE-PRESIDENT. To this the Chair bears no objection. The joint resolution will be passed over, and the Secretary will report the next case on the Calendar.
Motion to Delay the Reading of the Journal
Mr. EDMUNDS. Oh, no, Mr. President, I want to hear it through. I am very much interested in it.
The VICE-PRESIDENT. It requires unanimous consent to dispense with the reading.
Motion to Administer the Oath to Zachariah Chandler
The VICE-PRESIDENT. The Senator-elect will present himself at the desk and be sworn. Mr. CHANDLER advanced to the Vice-President's chair, escorted by Mr. FERRY, and the oath prescribed by law having been administered to Mr. CHANDLER he took his seat in the Senate.
Motion to Delay the Reading of the Journal
Mr. INGALLS, (at eleven o'clock and ten minutes a.m.) Mr. President, it appears to be past the hour to which the Senate adjourned yesterday, and I ask why the Journal is not read? The VICE-PRESIDENT. Simply because it is apparent there is no quorum present. Mr. INGALLS. Has the want of a quorum been ascertained in any definite manner? The VICE-PRESIDENT. It has been ascertained by view by the Chair. He regards it his duty under the first rule of the Senate not to permit the Journal to be read u
The VICE-PRESIDENT. That is an order. The Secretary will call the roll. The Secretary called the roll.
Motion to Delay the Reading of the Journal
The VICE-PRESIDENT. There is not a quorum present.
The VICE-PRESIDENT. The Secretary will call the roll of the Senate. The Secretary called the roll, and thirty-nine Senators answered to their names.
Mr. ANTHONY. Mr. President- Mr. EDMUNDS. There is not any quorum. Mr. COCKRELL. No quorum? The VICE-PRESIDENT. There is evidently no quorum present.
The VICE-PRESIDENT. It is not. There is no quorum present. It is a legislative act to give a notice.
The VICE-PRESIDENT. The roll of the Senate will be called. The Secretary called the roll, and 34 Senators answered to their names-less than a quorum.
The VICE-PRESIDENT, (at one o'clock and fifteen minutes· p.m.) There is a quorum present.
Resolution to Appoint Thomas W. Ferry President Pro Tempore of the Senate
Resolution to Appoint Thomas W. Ferry President Pro Tempore of the Senate: Mr. Bayard's Amendment
The SECRETARY. The resolution offered by the Senator from Rhode Island is as follows : Resolved, (the Vice-President being absent,) That Ron. THOMAS W. FERRY, one of the Senators from the State of Michigan, be, and he hereby is, appointed President pro tempore of the Senate. The Senator from Delaware proposes to amend by striking out "THOMAS W. FERRY, one of the Senators from the State of Michigan," and inserting "ALLEN G. THURMAN, of Ohio." The SECRETARY. The resolution offered by the Senator f
[Editor's Note: William A. Wheeler was the Vice President.]
Motion for Administration of the Oath
Motion for the Modified Oath of Office
Motion for the Senator from Pennsylvania to Withdraw the Motion
Mr. WALLACE. My motion is not open to debate. The VICE-PRESIDENT. It is not a debatable motion.
Mr. ROLLINS. I will occupy the attention of the Senate but a few moments. The VICE-PRESIDENT. The Senator from Pennsylvania assents. Mr. ROLLINS. Mr. President, before a vote is taken upon the pending question I desire to submit for the consideration of the Senate such precedents as I find which in my judgment are entitled to weight in the consideration of this case. After the most careful and diligent scrutiny of the records of the Senate, from the foundation of the Government down to the pre
Mr. WALLACE. I must insist on my motion as following the usual precedents in such cases. The VICE-PRESIDENT. The question is on the motion of the Senator from Pennsylvania that the credentials lie upon the table. Mr. BLAINE. Until to-morrow? Mr. WALLACE. Until to-morrow. The motion was agreed to.
By unanimous consent, the Vice-President was authorized to appoint the committee; and Messrs. BAYARD and ANTHONY were appointed as the committee on the part of the Senate.
By unanimous consent, the Vice-President was authorized to appoint the committee; and Messrs. BAYARD and ANTHONY were appointed as the committee on the part of the Senate.
Motion to Proceed with the Reading of Wednesday's Journal
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Chair is informed that the newly elected Senator from New Hampshire [Mr. Blair] is in the Chamber.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator-elect will please come forward and be sworn. Mr. BLAIR advanced to the desk, escorted by Mr. ROLLINS, and the oath prescribed by the act of July 2, 1862, having been administered to him, he took his seat in the Senate.
[Editor's Note: William A. Wheeler was serving as Vice President of the United States at this time.]
By unanimous consent, the Vice-President was authorized to appoint the committee on the part of the Senate; and Messrs. BAYARD and ANTHONY were appointed.
By unanimous consent, the Vice-President was authorized to appoint the committee on the part of the Senate; and Messrs. BAYARD and ANTHONY were appointed.
Death of Senator Zachariah Chandler
Administration of the Oath of office
Mr. BALDWIN advanced to the Vice-President's desk, escorted by Mr. FERRY, and the oath prescribed by the act of July 2, 1862, having been administered to Mr. BALDWIN, he took his seat in the Senate.
Mr. BALDWIN advanced to the Vice-President's desk, escorted by Mr. FERRY, and the oath prescribed by the act of July 2, 1862, having been administered to Mr. BALDWIN, he took his seat in the Senate.
Motion to Adopt: Death of Senator Houston
Motion to Proceed to the Election of a President pro tempore
Resolution for President pro tempore
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Rhode Island moves that the Senate do now adjourn. The motion was agreed to; there being on a division-ayes 22, noes 20; and (at five o'clock p. m.) the Senate adjourned.
Motion to Proceed to the Election of a President pro tempore
Resolution for President pro tempore
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from New York moves that the Senate adjourn. The motion was agreed to; and (at five o'clock and ten minutes p.m.) the Senate adjourned.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Georgia. has announced to the Senate that he has resigned, and that his resignation has been accepted.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. If there is no objection the Senator appointed by the Governor of Georgia will come forward and be sworn.
William A. Wheeler was serving as Vice President of the United States at this time.
By unanimous consent, the Vice-President was authorized to appoint the committee on the part of the Senate; and Messrs. BAYARD and ANTHONY were appointed.
By unanimous consent, the Vice-President was authorized to appoint the committee on the part of the Senate; and Messrs. BAYARD and ANTHONY were appointed.
Resolution for President Pro Tempore
Resolution for President Pro Tempore: Amendment
[Editor's Note: The Senate's adoption of the Resolution for President Pro Tempore was the election of John Sherman to the seat of President Pro Tempore.]
Motion to Escort the President Pro Tempore to the Chair
Mr. SHERMAN was escorted from his seat by Mr. EDMUNDS and Mr. VOORHEES, and, the oath prescribed by law having been administered to him by Mr. EDMUNDS, he took the chair as President pro tempore of the Senate and said: Senators, I return you my grateful thanks for the high honor you have conferred upon me. In common with all the people of the United States I share in profound sorrow for the death of the Vice-President, specially designated by the Constitution to act as President of the Senate. I
Mr. BLAIR and Mr. LOGAN advanced to the Vice-President's desk, escorted respectively by Mr. PIKE and Mr. CULLOM, and the oath prescribed by law having been administered to them, they took their seats in the Senate.
Resolution to the House of Representatives: President of the Senate Pro Tempore
Resolution to the President of the United States: President Pro Tempore
Resolution on the Late Thomas A. Hendricks
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The resolutions will lie on the table.
[The PRESIDENT pro tempore.] The question is on the motion of the Senator from Indiana [Mr. HARRISON] that the Senate do now adjourn. The motion was agreed to; and (at 2 o'clock and 42 minutes p.m.) the Senate adjourned.
Resolution to the House of Representatives: President of the Senate Pro Tempore
[Editor's Note: In the Resolution "Notification to the President" it is noted in the description that the creator of the Resolution, Mr. Blount, motioned for its adoption.] The resolution was adopted.
The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints as the committee to join the committee on the part of the Senate to wait upon the President, Mr. BLOUNT of Georgia, Mr. RANDALL of Pennsylvania, and Mr. REED of Maine.
The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints as the committee to join the committee on the part of the Senate to wait upon the President, Mr. BLOUNT of Georgia, Mr. RANDALL of Pennsylvania, and Mr. REED of Maine.
The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints as the committee to join the committee on the part of the Senate to wait upon the President, Mr. BLOUNT of Georgia, Mr. RANDALL of Pennsylvania, and Mr. REED of Maine.
Mr. RIDDLEBERGER. I do not want to occupy the floor; but I hope the Senator from Kansas will not compel me to do what the Presiding Officer of this body did on another occasion-simply decline to serve. I respectfully ask to be excused. I think the Senator from Kansas can afford to allow me to do that. The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Does the Senator from Kansas withdraw his motion? Mr. INGALLS. I did not understand that the Senator from Virginia desired immediate action on the suggestion he made. He
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Kansas moves that the Senate adjourn. The motion was agreed to; and (at 4 o'clock and 14 minutes p. m.) the Senate adjourned.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be placed upon the calendar.
Mr. HOAR. I approve of the purpose of this bill, and I approve the method by which the bill seeks to effect its purpose, with the exception of the seventh section. It seems to be that that is a violation of sounds legislative principle. It is an undertaking to put into the statutes of the United States a deprivation of a certain class of persons, described by a class, of a right of suffrage which they now enjoy, because of the assumption or presumption that persons belonging to that class will e
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Vermont asks the unanimous consent of the Senate to lay aside informally the pending business with a view to proceed with the consideration of of the bill taken up on his motion. Is there an objection? The Chair hears none.
[Mr. EDMUNDS.] I wish to say in reply to the Senator from Massachusetts that section 7 of this bill is proposed without regard to what his opinions or min may be on the propriety of extending the suffrage to women, and, so far as I am concerned, whenever the women of the United States or of any one of the States, a majority of them, desire to have the suffrage, they will get my vote to have it, either in the State of Vermont or wherever else I may be located. I think it depends, as it ought to d
Motion to Take up the Senator's Resolution
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill goes over under the rules.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Vermont moves that the Senate proceed to the consideration of Senate bill No. 10. The motion was agreed to; and the Senate, as in Committee of the Whole, resumed the consideration of the bill (S. 10) to amend an act entitled "An act to amend section 5352 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, in reference to bigamy, and for other purposes,'' approved March 22, 1882, the pending question being on the amendment proposed by Mr. HoAR, to strike out
Mr. BROWN. Mr. President, I am opposed to female suffrage, and in my own State if the question were up I would vote against it; but I believe it is a question of local self-government which ought to be left to the voters of each State or Territory to determine for themselves. The people of Utah having determined this question for themselves and adopted female suffrage, I shall vote for the motion of the Senator from Massachusetts to strike out the seventh section, believing that the people have
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on the adoption of the amendment of the Senator from Massachusetts [Mr. HOAR] on which the yeas and nays have been ordered. The Secretary proceeded to call the roll. Mr. ALLISON (when his name was called). I am paired with the Senator from North Carolina [Mr. RANSOM] on political questions. I reserve my vote for the present that I may see whether or not this is a political question. Mr. JACKSON (when his name was called). I am paired on this bill with
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report]: Mr. Edmund's Amendment
Mr. EDMUNDS. Mr. President, in all the study that the Committee on the Judiciary has given to the Territorial enactments of Utah we failed to discover or think of, because it is such an unnatural crime, the fact which now turns out to exist, that the criminal code of Utah makes no provision against that crime; and I have been informed since this bill was reported, by one of the judges of Utah, that he had recently a case of an aggravated character of that kind before and found that there was no
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on the amendment proposed by the Senator from Vermont. The amendment was agreed to.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The amendment will be read at the desk. The CHIEF CLERK. In section 24, after the word ''marriage,'' at the end of line 3, it is proposed to add Unless she shall have lawfully released her right thereto. The amendment was agreed to. Mr. HOAR. Before the Senator from Vermont passes from the last amendment-- The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The amendment has been agreed to.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Is there objection to the modification of the amendment? If there is no objection it will be considered as so modified. [Editor's Note: There was no objection recorded in the record, so we can conclude that the amendment was adopted.]
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report]: Mr. Edmund's Amendment
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. That change will be made unless there be objection. [Editor's Note: No objection was recorded, so we can conclude that the amendment was adopted.]
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report]: Mr. Van Wyck's Amendment
[Mr. VAN WYCK.] Mr. President, the existence of the so-called Utah Commission created by the act of 1882 has already been extended many years beyond the time proposed by the law when they were created. By the act itself they were to discharge the ordinary duties of registration and election officers, and nothing more. Three thousand dollars per annum were appropriated for that service to each commissioner; but President Arthur suggested to Congress that it would be impossible to obtain the grade
Mr. VANWYCK. The Senator says that this employment is merely exceptional; that when they need six or seven clerks and a janitor it is merely when they are required to do something in regard to registration. Let me call my friend's attention to the fact that in the same year, from January 1 to April 30, four months before the bill from which I read, I find, Paddock, Page, and Bynon, $400 each, as clerk. That is not an exception. Then the next report, as I stated, taking the dates up where they we
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on the adoption of the amendment of the Senator from Nebraska [Mr. VAN WYCK]. The amendment was rejected.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on agreeing to the amendment. The amendment was agreed to.
Mr. MORGAN. I desire to call the attention of the chairman of the Judiciary Committee to section 12 of the bill. I am not sure that I understand it. I will state what my understanding of it is, and I should be glad to be corrected in it if I am wrong. Section 12 provides for the annulling by this act of certain acts of the Territorial Legislature or of some legislative tribunal of the Territory of Utah "so far as the same may preclude the appointment by the United States of certain trustees of
Mr. MORGAN. I wish to inquire of the Senator from Vermont whether the ordinance from which he reads contains any provisions confining the duties and powers of the trustees? Mr. EDMUNDS. The trustees, as I read, are to hold, own, sell, buy, convey, and manage all the real and personal property of the concern. Mr. INGALLS. Is there any estimate of the amount of real and personal property? Mr. EDMUNDS. It would be purely guess-work. It is supposed to be enormous.. The very same statute of 1863,
Mr. EDMUNDS. Mr. President, I do not wish to delay the Senate, but I think I ought to spend a minute or two in reply to my friend from Colorado, whose sincerity I have the greatest respect for. Where is the persecution that the Mormons as I will call them at large, the polygamists, ever suffered in Utah? I say nothing about Nauvoo or any other place because that is too large a subject to go into. l I have heard of no anti-Mormon organization in that Territory that has ever committed any offenses
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report]: Mr. Morgan's Additional Amendments to Section 13
Mr. MORGAN. I think they had better be printed. The PRESIDENT pro tempore. That order will be made.
POLYGAMY AND AFFAIRS IN UTAH. The PRESIDENT pro tempore. It is the duty of the Chair to lay before the Senate the unfinished business.
A bill to amend an act entitled “An act to amend section 5352 of the Revised Statutes of the United States in reference to bigamy, and for other purposes,” approved March 22, 1882. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, &c., Than in any proceeding and examination before a grand jury, a judge, a justice, or a United States commissioner, or a court, in any prosecution for bigamy, polygamy, or unlawful cohabitation, under any statute of the United States, the lawful husband or w
Mr. MORGAN. Mr: President, the several amendments which I have proposed to sections 12 and 13 depend upon each other somewhat; that is, if the first amendment I propose is adopted, it makes the others necessary; and perhaps in -some cases the subsequent amendments I propose are necessary whether the first one be adopted or not. I believe, Mr. President, that the Senator from Vermont and myself agree that the effect of section 12, as it appears in this bill, if enacted, would be to put the Gover
Mr. MORGAN. It is not necessary for the purpose of trying to make the Senate comprehend the scope of my amendment that I should enter into that particular discussion now. Another act which I believe was originally an ordinance at all events it is an act of the Utah Legislature, approved January 12, 1856, incorporates what is called the Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company. That is a company which is under the control of the church. I shall not stop to read the act, but I think there can be no doubt
Mr. CALL. Mr. President, section 12 of the proposed statute which is now sought to be amended provides that fourteen trustees shall be appointed who shall take possession of the property of this corporation. The Constitution of the United States provides that private property shall not be taken for public use without compensation. Is this private property or not? Is the property of this corporation private or public property? It seems to me there can be no question in regard to that. This proper
The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. HAWLEY in the chair). The pending question is on the first amendment proposed by the Senator from Alabama [Mr. MORGAN]. The Secretary will report the amendment. The CHIEF CLERK. It is proposed to strike out all of section 12 after the word “annulled,” in line 7, and to insert: And the property of said corporation of every kind shall be disposed of according to the rules and principles of the common law as in case of the dissolution of a corporation. Mr. EDMUNDS. I th
Mr. TELLER. The act does not provide for paying them in. Mr. MORGAN. No, but I am assuming that the object of this whole transaction is to carry this fund into the common-school system of Utah Territory. I do not think the act does it; but we find a fund paid in by a voluntary tithe contribution amounting to millions of dollars to-day, I am informed and I have no doubt of it, the uses and purposes of which the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, as an incorporation, as a legal body, ha
Mr. TELLER. Mr. President, I expressed my idea yesterday of perhaps the folly of a man saying anything against this bill; first, because it comes from a committee of so high authority in this body; secondly, because it touches a question that I do not think the mass of the people are capable of coolly, carefully, dispassionately discussing, and no better illustration can be made of that than when a Senator on this floor who has read my remarks arises and attributes to me what I never said, eithe
Mr. CULLOM. Will the Senator allow me a word? Mr. TELLER. Certainly. Mr. CULLOM. I believe the Senator has announced that he was not in favor of the bill now before the Senate. Mr. TELLER. I have, most emphatically. Mr. CULLOM. I will inquire whether he would favor a substitute providing for a legislative commission to take the place of the Territorial Legislature? Mr. TELLER. When that question comes before the Senate I will examine it. I will state what I favor. I favor taking away from th
Mr. CULLOM. Does the Senator know also that there could not be writs served on persons inside the city limits of Nauvoo except by consent of Joseph Smith? Mr. TELLER. No, Mr. President, I do not. Mr. CULLOM. I do know it. Mr. TELLER. I know that was charged, but I know that the great State of Illinois, within whose borders I lived some years, has always since 1818 had the power to enforce its precepts. I know that the governor called out the militia and I know that the precepts of the State c
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The amendment will be received and printed if there be no objection. It is not now in order.
Mr. EDMUNDS. The question is the amendment of the Senator from Alabama [Mr. MORGAN.] I only wish to take a minute in stating for the committee that we hope this amendment will not be adopted. The policy of this bill has been to preserve the people of that Territory, and not to consolidate the different sects of the Mormon Church as they now exist there. His amendment strikes at the whole church and siestablishes every part of the Mormon Church, whether polygamous or anti-polygamous. The committe
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. It will be again read. The CHIEF CLERK. It is proposed to strike out all of section 12 after the word "annulled," in line 7, and insert in lieu thereof: And the property of said corporation, of every kind, shall be disposed of according to the rules and principles of the common law as in case of the dissolution of a corporation.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The section will be read as proposed to be amended. The Chief Clerk read as follows: SEC. 12. That the acts of the Legislative Assembly of Utah incorporating, continuing, or providing for the corporation known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the ordinance of the so-called General Assembly of the State of Deseret incorporating the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, so far as the same may now have legal force and validity, are hereby d
Motion for the Amendment of the Senator from Alabama to be Read.
Mr. EDMUNDS. I presume all these amendments depend on the one just voted on; do they not? Mr. MORGAN. Not every one. Mr. EDMUNDS. They all depend on that one, I believe. Mr. MORGAN. No sir; I have an amendment to section 13, line 16. The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Does not the Senator wish the question put on the amendments already printed? Mr. MORGAN. No, sir; except this. They depended upon the one which has been voted down...
Motion to Vote on the Amendment from the Senator from Alabama
The President ...The amendment was agreed to.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. If there be no objection the amendment will be considered as agreed to. It is agreed to.
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report] Mr. Vest's Amendment to Section 16
Mr. VEST. ...I have no disposition to continue the discussion of the bill. It seems to me, as a lawyer, that when the Senate enacts that this property shall be disposed of according to law, that accomplishes all that can be demand of the most extreme and inveterate enemy of polygamy or of any other institution in this Territory. That leaves the question to the courts, and I cannot, as a lawyer, give my assent to this extraordinary legislation which takes the property of any corporation that has
Mr. VEST. I want to settle one question. I have before me the act of incorporation. This is the amendatory act under which it is now operating, in the compiled laws of Utah. This act says: Be it ordained by the General Assembly of the State of Desert- Approved by the Territorial Legislature afterwards- That a general conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or a special conference of said church, to be called at such time and place as the first presidency of said church s
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report] Mr. Evart's Amendment to Mr. Vest's Amendment to Section 16
Motion to Vote on Agreeing to the Amendment from Mr. Evarts
Motion to Vote on Striking Out the Second Clause of Section 16
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report] Mr. Evart's Amendment
Motion to Read Mr. Brown's Amendment on Section 19 and 20
Motion to Vote on Mr. Brown's Amendment
Mr. EDMUNDS. That means to provide that neither shall testify against the other without the consent of the person accused. Mr. BROWN. No; without the consent of the person to be examined. Mr. EDMUNDS. The legal construction would be without the consent of the other party. But I will pass that. That is the way it would be if the amendment were adopted, but I will just say one word on the question of compulsory examination. At the common law the husband and wife were competent witnesses in cas
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Tennessee moves that the Senator do now adjourn. The motion was agreed to; and (at 6 o'clock and 17 minutes p.m.) the Senate adjourned.
Mr. EDMUNDS. Now, Mr. President, before the question is put, although there are hardly any of the friends of human liberty in the Senate, I will appeal to the logical-minded and reform men here and call their attention to this thing. As the amendment of the Senator from Georgia. now stands, I submit to him and to the Senate that it diminishes the present force of the common law and requires the consent of the accused person, instead of the willingness of the person who is called to testify; but
Mr. MORGAN. There is a feature in section 12 of the bill that I should like very much to have a better understanding of than I have now. I do not think I understand exactly what is the legal effect of section 12 if we enact it into a law, what its scope is, or what would result from it. Yesterday I called attention to some of the provisions of the statute of the Territory of Utah that this measure is intended to affect. Read in one way, the twelfth section re-enacts a portion of the statute of U
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report]: Mr. Morgan's Amendment
Mr. Morgan's Proposed Amendment to S. 10: An act to amend section 5352 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, in reference to bigamy and for other purposes
Motion to Read Mr. Morgan's Proposed Amendment
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The amendment will be read. The SECRETARY. After the words "assistant trustees," in line 13 of section 12, it is proposed to strike out the words: Provided for in the laws creating, amending, or continuing the said corporation. And to insert in lieu: To hold and manage and dispose of the property of said corporation according to law.
Mr. EDMUNDS. Mr. President, the Senator from Alabama said yesterday that he objected -to having this section stand in the bill, and now he objects to certain words in the section. I should expect from what he has said that he would object to having anything stand in the bill at all. But looked at in a practical point of view, the part of this bill that is disliked most by the first president of that political hierarchy, not in regard to doctrine or faith, but in regard to breaking up the politic
Motion to Read the Polygamic Revelation
[The PRESIDENT pro tempore.] The Chair hears none, and that order will be made.
Mr. EDMUNDS. Now, Mr. President, I wish to speak to the point of this twelfth section. My distinguished friend from Alabama says that it revives and continues a corporation that had been abolished by the act of 1862. Yesterday he spoke of this corporation as being continued and existing by authority of the Legislature of Utah, and he wished to abolish the whole corporation, and moved an amendment which got a much larger support than I should have expected it to get if Senators voting for it unde
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on the adoption of the amendment proposed by the Senator from Alabama. The amendment was rejected.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on the amendment proposed by the Senator from Florida.
S. 10 [Committee on the Judiciary Report]: Mr. Call's Second Amendment
[Mr. CALL.] Mr. President, I wish to say a few words in support of the amendment. I said yesterday that it was impossible for any one to give any reason on any ground of law or any plausible ground upon which it could be asserted that the Congress of the United States had the right to confiscate, to forfeit the property of this corporation or any other corporation. This act uses the term ''escheat.'' What is an escheat in the law? It is where there ceases to be any right of ownership, where an ·
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on the adoption of the first amendment proposed by the Senator from Florida [Mr. CALL]. The amendment was rejected.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question now is on the second amendment of the Senator from Florida, which will be read. The CHIEF CLERK. In section 13, line 12, it is proposed to strike out all after the word "States" down to and including the word ''God," in line 17, as follows: And all such property so forfeited and escheated to the United States shall be disposed of by the Secretary of the Interior, and the proceeds thereof applied to the use and benefit of the common schools in the Territo
Mr. EDMUNDS. It is simply sufficient to say in answer to that amendment that the thirteenth section provides for the forfeiture of any property that has been acquired in contravention of a positive statute of the United States. Mr. TELLER. I do not want to prolong this debate, but I do not understand the ru1e to be that property acquired by a corporation in violation of the provisions of the statute escheats to the Government. I have never known any such rule, all the authorities are different,
Motion for Secretary to Read the Proposed Amendment
Mr. BLAIR. Mr. President, as there seems to be so much doubt and difficulty in the application of the provisions of sever of the sections of this bill to the existing situation, it seems to be that the power of this Mormon hierarchy, which is concentrated in the hands of a very few individuals, could perhaps be best reached and destroyed without raising any legal uncertainties or controversies, by so contriving this bill that it shall subject them to a criminal prosecution where a grand jury wou
Mr. MORGAN. Mr. President, the friends of this measure seem determined to pass it in its present shape, yielding nothing to the opinions of others who have not had the opportunity to study it, which of course they have had. I have taken occasion since the bill has been under discussion to ask some question for information about its meaning, purpose, &c. Some of these questions have been answered by one member of the committee, the others not participating in the debate, but I shall take it for g
S. 10 [Third Reading]: Mr. Van Wyck's Proposal
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Chair will advise the Senator from Nebraska that the question is now upon the passage of. the bill, and it is not open to amendment. The bill was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading and has been read the third time. Mr. EDMUNDS. .Amendments are not in order.
Mr. VAN WYCK. Then I ask if the Senator from Vermont would object to an amendment of that kind? Mr. EDMUNDS. He most decidedly would, Mr. President.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is, Shall the title of the bill stand as reported?
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The title of the bill will stand as reported if there be no objection .
Mr. EDMUNDS. I have no objection, Mr. President.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from New Hampshire asks the unanimous consent of the Senate to have the bill printed in the RECORD as it passed the Senate. The Chair hears no objection, and it is so ordered. The bill is as follows: A bill to amend an act entitled “An act to amend section 5352 of the Revised Statutes of the United States in reference to bigamy, and for other purposes,” approved March 22, 1882. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, &c., Than in any proc
Hr. HEARST advanced to the chair of the President pro tempore, escorted by Mr. STANFORD, and the oath prescribed by law having been administered to him, he took his seat in the Senate.
Hr. HEARST advanced to the chair of the President pro tempore, escorted by Mr. STANFORD, and the oath prescribed by law having been administered to him, he took his seat in the Senate.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. If there be no objection the memorial will be inserted in the RECORD, and it will be referred, with the accompanying papers, to the Committee on Territories.
The first Monday of December being the day prescribed by the Constitution of the United States for the annual meeting of Congress, the second session of the Forty-ninth Congress convened this day. The Senators assembled in the Senate Chamber in the Capitol at Washington city. The PRESIDENT pro tempore (Mr. JOHN SHERMAN, a Senator from the State of Ohio) took the chair and called the Senate to order at 12 o'clock noon.
The first Monday of December being the day prescribed by the Constitution of the United States for the annual meeting of Congress, the second session of the Forty-ninth Congress convened this day. The Senators assembled in the Senate Chamber in the Capitol at Washington city. The PRESIDENT pro tempore (Mr. JOHN SHERMAN, a Senator from the State of Ohio) took the chair and called the Senate to order at 12 o'clock noon.
Rev. J. G. BUTLER, D. D., Chaplain to the Senate, offered the following prayer: Thou Giver of all good, inspire our hearts with true devotion that we may worship Thee acceptably. We adore Thee, the Mighty God, the Everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace. Amid these emblems of mourning teach us the right meaning of life. We thank Thee for the good hope through grace of the life that shall never end. In Thy kind providence, O Lord, Thou hast brought us again together, preserved during these month
Motion to Present the Credentials of A. P. Williams
Motion for A. P. Williams to Take the Oath of Office
Mr. WILLIAMS, escorted by Mr. STANFORD, advanced to the desk of the President pro tempore, and the oath prescribed by law having been administered to him, he took his seat in the Senate.
By unanimous consent, the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the committee on the part of the Senate; and Messrs. EDMUNDS and SAULSBURY were appointed.
By unanimous consent, the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the committee on the part of the Senate; and Messrs. EDMUNDS and SAULSBURY were appointed.
[Editor's Note: The committee to wait upon the president resolution was agreed to.]
Motion for the House to Take A Recess for Thirty Minutes
Motion to Move the House to Take a Further Recess until 2 o'clock
Report of committee to wait on the president
[Editor's Note: We can conclude from the record that the motion for the report was accepted, as the session proceeds with the president's message.]
President's Annual Message that is Referred to the Committee on Printing
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The credentials will be read. The credentials were read by the Chief Clerk.
Administration of the Oath of Office
Mr. CHENEY, escorted by Mr. BLAIR, advanced to the desk of the President pro tempore, and the oath prescribed by law having been administered to him, he took his seat in the Senate.
Mr. BENNETT. Lest my silence might be interpreted as consent to the division of time, which the chairman of the committee spoke of a while ago, I wish to say that I take this time because I can not get any more, and that I regard it as beggarly when a bill of such far-reaching provisions is to be considered by this House. In my opinion parts of the bill are simply atrocious. Mr. TUCKER rose. The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Virginia [Mr. TUCKER] is entitled to the floor. Mr. TUCKER. Mr. Speake
Mr. CAINE. Mr. Speaker, it is a work of supererogation to point out the enormities of this proposed legislation, which, while professing to be for the suppression of polygamy in the Territory of Utah, is actually a measure intended to suppress the Mormon Church and place its property in the hands of a receiver. Under ordinary circumstances I would content myself with entering a formal protest, serenely confident that enlightened mankind throughout the world will in due time condemn such legislat
Mr. CASWELL. The only point, Mr. Speaker, I desire to make is this, in order to show to the House that in 1862 the Congress of the United States exercised the right and did actually nullify the organization of this very church. What is the status, then, of this Mormon church? It has no legal existence; it has an existence merely de facto; and the only question is, what shall be done with the assets? This bill provides that the court may take charge and distribute the assets according to law and
Motion to Create a Conference Committee
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Vermont moves that the Senate disagree to the House amendment and ask a conference on the disagreeing votes. The motion was agreed to.
By unanimous consent the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the conferees on the part of the Senate, and Mr. EDMUNDS, Mr. INGALLS, and MR. PUGH were appointed.
By unanimous consent the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the conferees on the part of the Senate, and Mr. EDMUNDS, Mr. INGALLS, and MR. PUGH were appointed.
By unanimous consent the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the conferees on the part of the Senate, and Mr. EDMUNDS, Mr. INGALLS, and MR. PUGH were appointed.
By unanimous consent the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the conferees on the part of the Senate, and Mr. EDMUNDS, Mr. INGALLS, and MR. PUGH were appointed.
By unanimous consent the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the conferees on the part of the Senate, and Mr. EDMUNDS, Mr. INGALLS, and MR. PUGH were appointed.
By unanimous consent the President pro tempore was authorized to appoint the conferees on the part of the Senate, and Mr. EDMUNDS, Mr. INGALLS, and MR. PUGH were appointed.
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. ...The motion was agreed to; and (at 5 o'clock and 50 minutes p.m.) the Senate adjourned until to-morrow, Saturday, February 12, at 12 o'clock m.
S. 10 [Conference Committee Report]
Detailed Statement of the Conferees of the House
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Vermont asks the unanimous consent of the Senate that the bill (S. 10) to amend an act entitled "An act to amend section 5352 of the Revised Statutes of the United States in reference to bigamy, and for other purposes," be printed in bill form as agreed upon by the committee of conference. Mr. INGALLS. I suggest that it be printed so us to show the amendments made by the Senate and the bill as finally agreed upon by the committee of conference, so that
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. If there be no objection, the several bills will be printed as requested.
Mr. BENNETT. Mr. Speaker, it is hardly worth while for me to try to fasten the attention of this House upon the wrongful invasion made upon the individual consciences of the people of Utah by the provisions of the measure now under consideration. It may not be amiss to call the attention of this House to an instance of the intolerance of public clamor against the demands and rights of conscience. When Cromwell made his wicked invasion upon Ireland, during which he dispatched to John Bradshaw, p
Mr. HAMMOND. Mr. Speaker, since this bill passed by so overwhelming a majority that only eight stood up on the call for the yeas and nays, and since, in conference, it had been stripped of several of its harshest provisions, I supposed that it ought to be submitted to the House without debate. But, in deference to the gentleman from North Carolina [Mr. BENNETT] (who before occupied the floor by the grace of the House for nearly two hours in opposition to the bill), I determined to allow him thir
S. 10 [Conference Committee Report]
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The question is on agreeing to the report of the committee of conference. Mr. VEST. I should like to make an inquiry of the Senator from Vermont [Mr. EDMUNDS], who has the bill in charge. I see in the fourth section: If any person related to another person within and not including the fourth degree of consanguinity, computed according to the rules of the civil law, shall marry or cohabit with, or have sexual intercourse with such other so related person, knowing her or
Mr. EDMUNDS. It is due to my friend from Missouri that I should say a single word in answer to what he has stated. In the first place, he is mistaken as to what the bill as agreed upon by the managers of the conference and as it passed the Senate is in regard to property. As applied to the church there, the only provision is section 13 of the original Senate bill and section 13 of the rearranged bill reported by the managers in the same words, which provides for the forfeiture to the United Sta
The CHIEF CLERK. A bill (S. 2636) to incorporate the Maritime Canal Company of Nicaragua. Mr. EDMUNDS. It is my duty to insist upon the privileged question that is before the Senate. The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Chair having performed his duty, he is of opinion that the conference report is a privileged question. Mr. HARRIS. It clearly has the right of way, I should think. The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The unfinished business will be laid aside informally, with a view to proceed with the conf
(S. 10) to amend an act entitled "An act to amend section 5352 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, in reference to bigamy, and for other purposes," approved March 22, 1882
[Editor's Note: The President pro tempore signed the bill, and, as a result, it can be adopted in the platform.]
The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from South Carolina moves that the Senate adjourn. The motion was agreed to; and (at 6 o'clock p.m.) the Senate adjourned until Monday, February 21, at 12 o'clock m.
[Editor's Note: The record states that the bill was signed by the Speaker of the House. It is customary in the United States Congress that bills are signed by the Speaker and by the Vice President or President pro tempore of the Senate. We can conclude from the record of the Senate of this day that the bill was first signed by the Speaker of the House and sent to the Senate to be signed.]
Message from the President: Bills That Have Become Laws Without His Approval
Call to Order/Prayer: 1895-03-04
Also tagged as: Convention, Act
Mr. CRANE. What is the further pleasure of the Convention? Mr. CANNON. Mr. Chairman, I take pleasure in nominating as temporary president of this Convention, the Honorable James N. Kimball, of Weber County. Mr. Kimball was then unanimously elected as temporary president, and was greeted with applause as he ascended the platform.
Also tagged as: County, Elected, Convention
Mr. EICHNOR. Mr. President, for temporary secretary, I nominate Mr. Heber M. Wells, of Salt Lake. Mr. Wells was unanimously elected to the position.
Also tagged as: Salt, Elected, Secretary
Mr. SYMONS. Mr. President, I nominate J. F. Chidester, of Garfield County, for temporary sergeant-at-arms. Mr. Chidester was unanimously elected.
Also tagged as: County, Elected
Mr. VAN HORNE. Mr. President, I move you that the chair appoint a committee of five on privileges, elections, and qualifications of members. Mr. IVINS. Mr. President, does the gentlemen mean that this committee of five have control of all these different matters, or that a committee of five in each of these different departments be appointed? Mr. VAN HORNE. One committee, is the motion, Mr. President. Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, it seems to me that the usual and precedented order of business a
Also tagged as: Belonging, Business, Appoint, Matters, Elections, Control, Members, Second
Motion to Appoint a Committee of Five
Also tagged as: Second, Appoint
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Convention
Motion to Recess for an Hour
Also tagged as: Make, Taken
Motion to Adjourn Until Tomorrow
The motion was agreed to, and the Convention took an informal recess of one hour, after which it was called to order by the president pro tem.
Also tagged as: Convention
Announcement of delegates appointed to the Committee on Credentials
Also tagged as: Convention
Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. President, as a member of that committee, I would like to know the sense of the house as to what are the duties, and what is expected of them. I do not know whether I understand the extent of the power that is intended to be given to that committee. The PRESIDENT pro tem. I assume that it is to pass upon credentials. Mr. EVANS (Weber). I want to know whether it is expected that that committee will pass upon the contests or not? The PRESIDENT pro tem. I did not so unders
Also tagged as: Power, House, Law, Pass, Made, According, Duties, Member, Entitled
Call to Order 03-05-1895 10:30:00
Also tagged as: Convention
Mr. JOLLEY. Mr. President, before we proceed, I would like to say that J. L. Jolley and Mr. Peterson went down to the Chief Justice and took the oath. If it is necessary, we will take it again. The PRESIDENT pro tem. That is not necessary, I think, sir.
Also tagged as: Necessary, Justice
Mr. CHRISTIANSON. Mr. President, I, in connection with Mr. Jolley, took the oath yesterday. Mr. PIERCE. Mr. President, I would suggest that the records ought to be amended in such a way as to show that these two gentlemen took the oath, that our record would be complete; and they would prima facie be entitled to participate in the proceedings; otherwise, the record would not show that they had taken the oath. The PRESIDENT pro tem. That oath was taken privately, was it, before the Chief Justic
Also tagged as: Taken, Justice, Entitled, Office, Proceedings
Power to investigate
Also tagged as: Second, Third, Lake, City, Salt, Qualification, Power
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, before the vote is taken on this question, I desire to make some observations to the assembly in support of the points that I shall make; that you are absolutely without jurisdiction in the premises. It is true, a body of this kind has the physical power; a member may cast his vote through and because of his own volition to do an act which, joined with the votes of others, may result in the consummation of something; but he has not or may not have the legal right to do
Also tagged as: Election, Convention, Law, Evidence, Elected, Time, Legislative, Member, Determine, Case, Day, Territory, Made, People, Right, Act, Judge, Person, Persons, House, Members, Duty, First, Authority, Make, Vote, Seat, Sufficient, Proceedings, Votes, Jurisdiction, Subject, Government, United, Officer, Entitled, States, Cases, Laws, Qualification, Claims, Office, Congress, Place, Third, City, Legislature, Authorize, Proposition, Elections, Remain, Public, Terms, Taken, Rights, Effect, State, Number, Support, Second, Absence, Pass, Common, Trial, Admitted, District, Control, Purpose, Houses, Utah, Power
Mr. VAN HORNE. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention, as the mover of the motion, it becomes my duty to speak to the question of whether it shall prevail or not. You have heard an argument against the motion. With you will rest the question of whether it is right, whether it is just, whether it is equitable, and whether it is legal, that that motion shall prevail. To begin with, I will say that, so far as I, the mover of the motion, was actuated, I made that motion with a full adheren
Also tagged as: Convention, Elected, Act, Power, Right, Members, Election, Seat, People, Time, Purpose, Evidence, Law, Constitution, State, Lake, Salt, Day, Made, Third, Part, House, Determine, Vote, Utah, Territory, States, Cases, Elections, Authority, Make, Persons, Majority, Congress, Member, Entitled, Board, Number, City, Days, Business, Legislative, County, Case, Duties, First, Receive, Judgment, Duty, Votes, Proposition, Government, United, Appoint, Pass, According, Necessary, Proposed, Holding, Subject, Perform, Proper, Nothing, Secretary, Taken, Proceedings, Rights, Jurisdiction, Justice, Admission, Issue, Judge, Provided, Office, Laws, Court, Consist, Monday, Legislature, Least, Qualification
Motion to Amend Previous Motion
Also tagged as: Seat, Made, Purpose, Members, Third, First
The CHAIRMAN. I didn't understand that the gentleman from Kane County yielded his motion. Mr. ROBINSON (Kane). No, sir; I haven't yielded, on the ground that the other committee should make its report before we can proceed in a proper manner. Mr. EICHNOR. Mr. President, I would request the gentleman from Kane County to withhold his motion for a little while. I understand the committee on credentials is ready to report. Mr. ROBINSON (Kane.) I will withhold it on that ground. Mr. ELDREDGE. Mr.
Also tagged as: County, Appoint, Number, Member, Convention, Make, Necessary
Power to investigate
Also tagged as: Power, Salt, Entitled, Following, City, Adoption, Cases, Evidence, Convention, Right, Second, Third, Lake
Moved a permanent president be selected.
Nomination of Mr. Smith for President
Also tagged as: Place, City, Third, Lake, Convention, Second, Salt
Close Nominations for President
Declare President by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Declared, House, Number
The CHAIRMAN. It has been moved and seconded that the rules be suspended and that John Henry Smith be declared permanent president of this Convention by acclamation. Those in favor of the same will say aye; contrary no. The ayes seem to have it.
Also tagged as: Declared, Convention
The CHAIRMAN. Now, let me understand_is this on the absolute vote or is it on the_ Mr. IVINS. It is on my motion that John Henry Smith be declared by acclamation to be the permanent president of this assembly.
Also tagged as: Declared, Vote
The CHAIRMAN. You have heard the motion, gentlemen, those in favor of John Henry Smith for president will stand up. The secretary pro tem. announced an affirmative vote of ninety. The CHAIRMAN. There being ninety in the affirmative, I believe it is not necessary to call the noes. Mr. John Henry Smith is declared permanent president. Mr. Squires and Mr. Roberts, will you conduct Mr. Smith to the chair? The gentlemen mentioned conducted Mr. Smith to the chair.
Also tagged as: Vote, Declared, Necessary, Secretary
Mr. John Henry Smith is declared permanent president.
President SMITH. Gentlemen of the Convention: It will be impossible for me to find words to express to you the feelings that are within my breast. For many years it has been a dream of mine that the day would yet come when the people of the Territory of Utah, burying their past differences, would strike hands upon common ground, and as lovers of the same great commonwealth put their hands to the plow of statehood and endeavor to bring the people of that commonwealth into the enjoyment of every r
Also tagged as: Made, Powers, Act, Constitution, Judgment, Perform, Trust, Government, Power, Become, Purpose, Days, Receive, Fixed, Day, Justice, Common, Taxation, Times, Territory, Pass, People, Matters, Support, States, Convention, Labor, Mines, Representatives, Time, Years, Law, Duty, Entered, Place, Part, State, Exercise, United, Utah, Duties, Right, Rights
Mr. TATLOCK. Mr. President, and gentlemen of the Convention: I am proud to salute a man who was born in the Territory, whose motto was “Our liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain.”On my way to the building this morning I was accosted by a number of your friends and my friends, the friends of this Convention, who imposed upon me the very pleasant and delicate duty of asking you to accept from them an emblem of your authority during the continuance of this Convention. The article whic
Also tagged as: Years, War, Salt, Duty, Territory, City, People, Made, Authority, Number, Grand, Trust, Part, State, Rights, Day, Necessary, Taken, Convention, Least, Lake
Convention Permanent Officers [Resolution No. 7.D]: Amendment
Also tagged as: Officers, Convention
Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, I understand that this committee appointed by the Convention yesterday to fix upon the number of committees which we shall need, during the progress of the Convention, is about ready to report, and I should judge that before we ruled out the election of three committee clerks, it would be wise to get the report of that committee and ascertain how many committees we have got to handle. I do not consider that it is possible for this Convention to get along without commi
Also tagged as: Convention, Sufficient, Member, Legislative, Amount, Paid, Appoint, Vote, Purpose, Necessary, Respective, Support, Case, Second, Times, Least, Dollars, Several, Use, Judge, Adoption, Day, Secretary, Reasons, Proper, Rate, Nothing, Compensation, Money, Provide, Officers, Business, Election, Number, Duties, Members, Time, First
Convention Permanent Officers [Resolution No. 7.D]: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Second, Effect, Convention, Officers, Official, Purpose
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, and gentlemen of the Convention, I think that that would not be necessary. The same object would be attained if the gentleman would wait until this is adopted, and in naming an official stenographer, if he so desire it could be referred to a committee of five. We certainly want an official stenographer. Mr. ROBERTS. It seems to me that if the gentleman offering the resolution contemplates the reference of the matter of the official stenographer to a committee, if he c
Also tagged as: Official, Convention, Receive, Necessary, Name, Fill, Officer, Subject, Fixed, Provided, Office, Provide, Power, House, State, Compensation, Officers
Convention Permanent Officers [Resolution No. 7.D]: Third Amendment
Also tagged as: Third, Convention, Officers, Providing
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, with the consent of my second I will accept that amendment.
Also tagged as: Second, Consent
Mr. THATCHER. Will you gentlemen kindly insert the words, “lady typewriters?” Mr. SQUIRES. I should be very glad Mr. President, when we come to select those clerks if there are lady candidates to give my vote for them.
Also tagged as: Vote
Election of Officers
Also tagged as: Election, Officers
Nomination of Mr. Christensen
Also tagged as: County, Second, Convention
Election by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Election
Appointments to Bring Mr. Christensen Forward
Also tagged as: Seat, Appoint
Mr. PIERCE. Mr. President, wouldn't it save time to elect all that we are to elect and have them sworn in at the same time?
Also tagged as: Time
The PRESIDENT. Yes; we will let the temporary secretary then retain his seat.
Also tagged as: Seat, Secretary
All Naming and Voting be Done at Once
Also tagged as: Offices, Taken, Voting, Make, Vote, Respective
Nomination for Minute Clerk
Also tagged as: County, Name
Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, in order to put them in a way that we can get them all at once, I respectfully request that Mr. Cannon rise and read the names of those candidates that were elected. [Laughter.] If we are going to save time, Mr. President, that is the best way to save time.
Also tagged as: Time, Elected
Not Consider the Committee Clerks at Present
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, that motion has already been passed upon.
Also tagged as: Passed
The PRESIDENT. That motion has been passed upon.
Also tagged as: Passed
Mr. VARIAN. If the gentleman voted in the affirmative, he is not entitled to reconsider, because that motion was lost on a negative vote. Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, as a matter of fact there are no candidates before this Convention this morning for those three places, consequently the motion would not be necessary. [Laughter.]
Also tagged as: Vote, Places, Entitled, Necessary, Convention
Point of Order: Mr. Eldredge Out of Order
Move to Reconsider the Motion
Also tagged as: House, Adoption
Mr. THURMAN. Mr. President, there are some of us here who for some reason did not have notice of a caucus yesterday afternoon. If some gentleman who was there will state what they did there we can probably adopt it as a whole. [Laughter.] The PRESIDENT. As I understand the situation at the present time, it is, Mr. Eldredge moved to reconsider the question of passing upon this at once, having voted in favor of it. Mr. WILLIAMS. Mr. President, may I ask a question? Mr. THATCHER. I move as an am
Also tagged as: Name, State, Provide, Following, Time
Ignore Appointment of Committee Clerks.
Also tagged as: Time, Consent, Convention
Mr. BUTTON. Mr. President, I would like to have Mr. Varian, as mover of that motion, leave out the stenographer too. Mr. VARIAN. No; that has been decided. I don't care to do that. I am in favor of a stenographer. I think it is useless to dwell on that subject. Mr. BOWDLE. Mr. President, I move you to amend the resolution offered by the gentleman from Salt Lake by striking out the word “stenographer.” Mr. ROBERTS. I second the amendment.
Also tagged as: Subject, Salt, Second, Lake
Point of Order: Mr. Eldredge's Motion Out of Order
Also tagged as: Consent, House, Made, Elected, Effect, Officers, Vote
Reconsideration of Vote
Also tagged as: Vote, Officers
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, I arise for information. Is the resolution which you desire to reconsider the one offered by Mr. Varian? Mr. VAN HORNE. Yes, sir. Mr. ROBERTS. Mr. President, for information, I would like to know if the question before the house is upon the unanimous consent for the consideration of Mr. Varian's resolution to eliminate the three committee clerks? Mr. VAN HORNE. Mr. President, I understood that was adopted. Mr. President, I will say for the benefit of the gentleman,
Also tagged as: Time, Convention, Made, Business, Vote, Consent, Connected, Regular, Purpose, Place, Make, House, Offices, Fixed, Officers
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, in view of the fact that a motion was made to reconsider I will withdraw mine.
Also tagged as: Made
Proceed with Singular Elections
Also tagged as: Officers, Time, Elections
Nomination of Engrossing Clerk
Also tagged as: Name
Point of Order: Not the Order of Business
Also tagged as: Business
Election by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Election
Nomination of Sergeant-at-Arms
Also tagged as: Convention
Nomination of Watchman and Janitor
Election by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Election
Suspension of Rules for Duration
Also tagged as: Case
Mr. IVINS. Mr. President, if the president will permit me to suggest, I regard it as unnecessary to put this question, whether the rules will be suspended unless there is some objection. If there is a motion to suspend the rules, the chair might say, unless there is an objection, the rules are suspended and go right on and elect these officers.
Also tagged as: Right, Officers
Nomination for Messenger
Also tagged as: Name
Renomination for Engrossment Clerk
Also tagged as: Places, Territory, Amount
Nomination for Engrossing and Enrolling Clerk
Also tagged as: County, Name, Second, Place
Mr. KIESEL. Mr. President, I desire to know for information which of these is on the slate. Mr. EICHNOR. Smith. The PRESIDENT. I am not prepared myself to say. Mr. NEBEKER. Mr. President, I arise in support of the nomination of Mr. Pratt. As the Convention has proceeded as a sort of a ratification meeting, at this point I shall try and break the monotony by voting for Mr. Pratt.
Also tagged as: Voting, Convention, Support
Motion Seconded
Also tagged as: Nothing, Second, Days, Business
Mr. ANDERSON. Mr. President, I can say in behalf of Joseph A. Smith, that he is well qualified and a good, competent man and will fill the place with honor and ability if elected.
Also tagged as: Fill, Elected, Qualified, Place
Nomination for Engrossing and Enrolling Clerk
Also tagged as: Place, County
Mr. LOW (Cache). I have this to say, Mr. President, in favor of the nominee from Cache County; he is the slated member for this position, he is the gentleman from Cache and should be supported by this Convention. Mr. THURMAN. Mr. President, I regret to say that we have come to the dividing roads, and I will have to part company with the caucus on this question. I have stood by the caucus faithfully, manfully I trust, although they omitted by an oversight yesterday to notify me that the caucus w
Also tagged as: Part, Support, Convention, County, Member, Trust
Mr. CORAY. Mr. President, I understand we suspended the rules here to apply to each nomination. The PRESIDENT. Until objection was made, Mr. Coray. Mr. MALONEY. Mr. President, the proper thing to do is to call the roll, when there are three candidates. The PRESIDENT. The question is, shall the nominations close?
Also tagged as: Proper, Made
The PRESIDENT. The nominees before this Convention are Milando Pratt, Joseph A. Smith and Newton Farr. Mr. CRANE. Mr. President, I move that as the roll is called each man names the candidate he desires for this position. Mr. PIERCE. That is correct. The following was the vote on the roll call: Mr. GOODWIN. Mr. President, may I be permitted to explain my vote? The PRESIDENT. Yes, sir. Mr. GOODWIN. It was represented to a few of us that Cache County had set its heart on Mr. Smith; that i
Also tagged as: Vote, Change, Lake, Name, Salt, Votes, County, Cast, Time, Secretary, Made, Place, Authorized, Remain, Following, Pardon, Second, Reasons, Elected, Officer, Convention, Voting, Evidence, Objections
Request of Leave
Also tagged as: Voting, Election, Place, Following
The PRESIDENT. If there is no objection the gentleman will be granted his leave of absence. [As with the motion it decides, this decision took place during the voting for the election of the engrossing and enrolling clerk.]
Also tagged as: Place, Voting, Absence, Election, Granted
Mr. BOYER. Mr. President, in my sympathy with the man who is bereft of a dear friend, in behalf of myself and others, I would like to know his name and county. Mr. CHRISTIANSON. My name is Parley Christianson, of Mayfield, Sanpete County. [As with the motion it links to, this dialogue took place during the voting for the election of the engrossing and enrolling clerk.]
Also tagged as: Name, County, Voting, Election, Place
The PRESIDENT. Mr. Smith is elected.
Also tagged as: Elected
Suspension of Rules and Extension of Condolence
Also tagged as: County, Convention
Mr. EICHNOR. No, no, let us finish. Mr. JOLLEY. I suppose it is understood that Mr. Christianson is excused, is it not? The PRESIDENT. Yes, sir. Mr. EVANS (Weber). Has the chairman declared the vote? The CHAIRMAN. There is a motion for adjournment, has there been a second to it?
Also tagged as: Vote, Second, Declared
Vote be Made Unanimous
Also tagged as: Made, Election, Vote
The PRESIDENT. The next order of business is the election of one official stenographer and typewriter.