Search Results (2908)

It was moved by the honorable Robert Morris Esquire, One of the Deputies from Pennsylvania, that a President be elected by ballot, which was agreed to.
Motion that a President be elected by ballot
Additional rules and standing orders for the Convention
Also tagged as: Committee of Rules, President
Mr President left the chair. Mr Gorham, chosen by ballot, took the chair of the Committee.
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
There being 5. ays, 4 noes, 1 divd. a question was asked whether a majority had voted in the affirmative? The President decided that it was an affirmative vote. Editors note: The answer is that the previous vote should not be voided, and for this reason a Drop Proposal vote has been used.
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee
Also tagged as: Virginia Plan
The Virginia Plan as reported by the Committee
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
Mr. Hamilton, had been hitherto silent on the business before the Convention, partly from respect to others whose superior abilities age & experience rendered him unwilling to bring forward ideas dissimilar to theirs, and partly from his delicate situation with respect to his own State, to whose sentiments as expressed by his Colleagues, he could by no means accede. The crisis however which now marked our affairs, was too serious to permit any scruples whatever to prevail over the duty imposed o
Also tagged as: Articles of Confederation, Virginia Plan, New Jersey Plan, Democracy, Corruption, Tyranny, National Executive, National Legislature, National Judiciary, Federalism, Monarchy, Term Limits, Negative, Veto, Executive Pardon, Mode of Appointment, Lifetime Appointment, Good Behavior, The States, Tribunal, Lower Courts, Compensation
Motion that the Committee of the Whole have leave to sit again tomorrow
Mr President left the Chair Mr Gorham took the Chair of the Committee
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee
Also tagged as: National Government, Virginia Plan, Three-Fifths Compromise, Bicameral Legislature, Supreme Executive, Supreme Legislative, Supreme Judiciary, New Jersey Plan, Republican, Guarantee, Indians, Amendment, State Legislatures, The People, Single Executive, National Executive, National Treasury, National Legislature, National Judiciary, Committee of the Whole, Admission of States, Compensation, First Branch of National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Suffrage, Union, United States, Harmony, Congress, Term of Office, Impeachment, Separation of Powers, Inferior Tribunals, Revenue
Proposed rules and standing orders for the Convention - Franklin's Proposal for Prayers
Also tagged as: Ancient World, Religion, Republic
Motion to write to New Hampshire
The discussion of yesterday resumed. Mr. Wilson. The question now before us is of so much consequence, that I cannot give it a silent vote — Gentlemen have said, that if this amendment is not agreed to, a separation to the north of Pennsylvania may be the consequence. — This neither staggers me in my sentiments or my duty. If a minority should refuse their assent to the new plan of a general government, and if they will have their own will, and without it, separate the union, let it be done;
Also tagged as: The Revolutionary War, Aristocracy, Articles of Confederation, Federalism, First Branch of National Legislature, Interests, Large State, Legislative Branch, Monarchy, Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Slavery, Small State, Suffrage, The People, The States, Virginia Plan
Mr. Governr. Morris was opposed to a restriction of this right in either branch, considered merely in itself and as unconnected with the point of representation in the 2d. branch. It will disable the 2d. branch from proposing its own money plans, and giving the people an opportunity of judging by comparison of the merits of those proposed by the 1st. branch. Mr. Wilson could see nothing like a concession here on the part of the smaller States. If both branches were to say yes or no, it was of
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Congress, Democracy, Divided sovereignty, Excess of Democracy, Executive, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Lords, House of Representatives, Large State, National Treasury, Negative, Originating Money Bills, Parliament, Power of the Purse, Proportional Representation, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Separation of Powers, Small State, The People, Veto
Letter from the Secretary to the Library Company of Philadelphia
Mr. Governeur Morris. It is necessary to take into one view all that relates to the establishment of the Executive; on the due formation of which must depend the efficacy & utility of the Union among the present and future States. It has been a maxim in political Science that Republican Government is not adapted to a large extent of Country, because the energy of the Executive Magistracy can not reach the extreme parts of it. Our Country is an extensive one. We must either then renounce the bles
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Executive, Executive Appointment, Executive Branch, Executive Corruption, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, Impeachment, Legislative Appointment, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Length of Term, Lifetime Appointment, Mode of Election, National Legislature, Northern States, Republican, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate, Separation of Powers, Slavery, Southern States, Term Limits, Union
Mr. Pinkney & Mr Govr. Morris moved to strike out this part of the Resolution. Mr P. observd. he ought not to be impeachable whilst in office Mr. Davie. If he be not impeachable whilst in office, he will spare no efforts or means whatever to get himself re-elected. He considered this as an essential security for the good behaviour of the Executive. Mr Wilson concurred in the necessity of making the Executive impeachable whilst in office. Mr. Govr. Morris. He can do no criminal act witho
Also tagged as: Check on Power, Checks on Power, Corruption, Crime, Electors, Good Behavior, Impeachment, Judicial Branch, Length of Term, Lifetime Appointment, Magistracy, Military, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, National Treasury, Parties, President, Second Branch of National Legislature, Second Term, Senate, Separation of Powers, Term Limits, Tyranny, Treason, War, War Powers
Mr. Gerry. We seem to be entirely at a loss on this head. He would suggest whether it would not be advisable to refer the clause relating to the Executive to the Committee of detail to be appointed. Perhaps they will be able to hit on something that may unite the various opinions which have been thrown out. Mr. Wilson. As the great difficulty seems to spring from the mode of election, he wd. suggest a mode which had not been mentioned. It was that the Executive be elected for 6 years by a sma
The Virginia Plan as amended in Committee [Resolutions] - Ninth Resolution (Working Version): Gerry for Appointment by the State Executives
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Legislative Appointment, Mode of Election, National Executive, National Legislature, Separation of Powers, State Legislatures
Mr. Elseworth. By this means a deserving Magistrate may be reelected without making him dependent on the Legislature. Mr. Gerry repeated his remark that an election at all by the Natl. Legislature was radically and incurably wrong; and moved that the Executive be appointed by the Governours & Presidents of the States, with advice of their Councils, and when there are no Councils by Electors chosen by the Legislatures. The executives to vote in the following proportions: viz -- Mr. Madison.
Also tagged as: Electoral College, Electors, Large State, Legislative Appointment, Magistracy, Mode of Election, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Separation of Powers, State Constitutions, State Executive, State Legislature
Mr. Sherman. This will restrain the operation of the clause too much. It will particularly exclude a mutual negative in the case of ballots, which he hoped would take place. Mr. Ghorum contended that elections ought to be made by joint ballot. If separate ballots should be made for the President, and the two branches should be each attached to a favorite, great delay, contention & confusion may ensue. These inconveniences have been felt in Masts. in the election of officers of little importan
Also tagged as: Negative, President, Senate
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 2 - Pinckney's Proposal on Property Qualifications
Also tagged as: First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Property, Qualifications for Office, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Mr. Pinkney — The Committee as he had conceived were instructed to report the proper qualifications of property for the members of the Natl. Legislature; instead of which they have referred the task to the Natl. Legislature itself. Should it be left on this footing, the first Legislature will meet without any particular qualifications of property; and if it should happen to consist of rich men they might fix such such qualifications as may be too favorable to the rich; if of poor men, an opposit
Also tagged as: Aristocracy, Eastern States, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Executive, National Judiciary, National Legislature, Northern States, Propertied, Property, Qualifications for Office, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Southern States
Mr. Elseworth was opposed to it. It would be a pleasing ground of confidence to the people that no law or burden could be imposed on them, by a few men. He reminded the movers that the Constitution proposed to give such a discretion with regard to the number of Representatives that a very inconvenient number was not to be apprehended. The inconveniency of secessions may be guarded agst by giving to each House an authority to require the attendance of absent members. Mr. Wilson concurred in th
Mr. Randolph would not repeat his reasons, but barely remind the members from the smaller States of the compromise by which the larger States were entitled to this privilege. Col. Mason. This amendment removes all the objections urged agst. the section as it stood at first. By specifying purposes of revenue, it obviated the objection that the Section extended to all bills under which money might incidentally arise. By authorizing amendments in the Senate it got rid of the objections that the
Also tagged as: British Constitution, British Model, Commerce, Executive, General Government, House of Commons, House of Lords, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Money Bills, National Government, National Legislature, National Treasury, Negative, Parliament, Qualifications for Office, Representation, Republic, Republican, Revenue, Senate, Small State, Taxation, War
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Madison's Amendment
Also tagged as: Congress, Judicial Branch, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, Supreme Court, Veto
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following amendmt of the 13th sect. of the 6 article, “Every bill which shall have passed the two Houses, shall, before it become a law, be severally presented to the President of the United States and to the Judges of the supreme court, for the revision of each — If, upon such revision, they shall approve of it, they shall respectively signify their approbation by signing it — But, if upon such revision, it shall appear improper to either or both to
Mr. Govr. Morris regretted that something like the proposed check could not be agreed to. He dwelt on the importance of public Credit, and the difficulty of supporting it without some strong barrier against the instability of legislative Assemblies. He suggested the idea of requiring three fourths of each house to repeal laws where the President should not concur. He had no great reliance on the revisionary power as the Executive was now to be constituted (elected by the Congress). The legislatu
Also tagged as: Credit, Executive, Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, Legislative Branch, National Judiciary, National Legislature, President, Veto, War
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Williamson for Three Quarters, Not Two Thirds
Also tagged as: Executive, Judicial Branch, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, National Legislature, President, Veto
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Madison to Insert "Or Resolve"
Also tagged as: House of Representatives, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, President, Senate
It was moved and seconded to amend the first clause of the 13 sect. of the 6 article as follows, “No Bill or resolve of the Senate and House of representatives shall become a Law, or have force until it shall have been presented to the President of the United States for his revision” which passed in the negative. [Ayes — 3; noes — 8.] Editors' note: Madison writes curtly, "After a short and rather confused conversation on the subject, the question was put & rejected."
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - "Ten (Sundays Excepted)"
Also tagged as: Executive Branch, Legislative Authority, Legislative Branch, Legislative Power, President
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 14 (Newly Created)
Also tagged as: Adjournment, Executive, Executive Authority, First Branch of National Legislature, House of Representatives, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Veto
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following as the 14 section of the 6. article. “every order, resolution or vote, to which the concurrence of the Senate and House of representatives may be necessary (except on a question of adjournment, and in the cases hereinafter mentioned) shall be presented to the President for his revision; and before the same shall have force, shall be approved by him, or, being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by the Senate and House of representatives, a
Mr Pinkney opposed the vesting this power in the Legislature. Its proceedings were too slow. It wd. meet but once a year. The Hs. of Reps. would be too numerous for such deliberations. The Senate would be the best depositary, being more acquainted with foreign affairs, and most capable of proper resolutions. If the States are equally represented in Senate, so as to give no advantage to large States, the power will notwithstanding be safe, as the small have their all at stake in such cases as wel
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive, Executive Power, First Branch of National Legislature, Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Large State, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Power of War, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Proposed rules and standing orders for the Convention - Rutledge's August/September Timetable
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following resolution, namely, Resolved That this Convention will meet punctually at 10 o’clock every morning (Sundays excepted) and sit till four o’clock in the afternoon, at which time the President shall adjourn the Convention and that no motion for adjournment be allowed. which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 9; noes — 2.]
Further Propositions for the Committee of Detail - Gerry on Qualifications for the President and Impeachment of Supreme Court Justices
Mr. Madison observed that the Senate represented the States alone, and that for this as well as other obvious reasons it was proper that the President should be an agent in Treaties. Mr. Govr. Morris did not know that he should agree to refer the making of Treaties to the Senate at all, but for the present wd. move to add as an amendment to the section, after “Treaties” — “but no Treaty shall be binding on the U. S. which is not ratified by a law.”
Also tagged as: Diplomacy, Executive, Executive Power, Foreign Affairs, Legislative Power, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate, Treaties
Mr. Madison hinted for consideration, whether a distinction might not be made between different sorts of Treaties — Allowing the President & Senate to make Treaties eventual and of Alliance for limited terms — and requiring the concurrence of the whole Legislature in other Treaties.
Also tagged as: Congress, Executive, Executive Power, Legislative Power, National Legislature, Second Branch of National Legislature, Senate
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 1
Mr. Sherman objected to it as depriving the States represented in the Senate of the negative intended them in that house, Mr. Ghorum said it was wrong to be considering, at every turn whom the Senate would represent. The public good was the true object to be kept in view— Great delay and confusion would ensue if the two Houses shd vote separately, each having a negative on the choice of the other. Mr. Dayton. It might be well for those not to consider how the Senate was constituted, whose
Mr Brearly was opposed to the motion for inserting the word “joint”. The argument that the small States should not put their hands into the pockets of the large ones did not apply in this case. Mr. Wilson urged the reasonableness of giving the larger States a larger share of the appointment, and the danger of delay from a disagreement of the two Houses. He remarked also that the Senate had peculiar powers balancing the advantage given by a joint balot in this case to the other branch of the L
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 1 - Final Two Clauses: Read on the Casting Vote
On the question to agree to the following clause “and in case the numbers for the two highest in votes should be equal, then the President of the Senate shall have an additional casting voice” it passed in the negative. Editors' note: Madison writes that the motion "was disagreed to by a general negative."
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 1 - Final Two Clauses: Morris for Electors Chosen by People
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 2 - Morris's Amendment
It was moved and seconded to postpone the consideration of the following clause. 2 section. 10 article “He shall be removed from his office on impeachment by the House of representatives, and conviction in the supreme Court, of treason, bribery, or corruption” which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes, "The clause for removing the President on impeachment by the House of Reps and conviction in the supreme Court, of Treason, Bribery or corruption, was postponed nem:
Mr. Govr. Morris objected also to the President of the Senate being provisional successor to the President, and suggested a designation of the Chief Justice. Mr. Madison added as a ground of objection that the Senate might retard the appointment of a President in order to carry points whilst the revisionary power was in the President of their own body, but suggested that the Executive powers during a vacancy, be administered by the persons composing the Council to the President.
It was moved and seconded to postpone the last clause of the 2 section, 10 article. which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes, "Mr Williamson suggested that the Legislature ought to have power to provide for occasional successors. & moved that the last clause (of 2 sect. X art:) relating to a provisional successor to the President be postponed. "Mr Dickinson 2ded. the postponement. remarking that it was too vague. What is the extent of the term “disability” & who is
Mr. Pinkney...remarked that there were five distinct commercial interests— 1. the fisheries & W. India trade, which belonged to the N. England States. 2. the interest of N. York lay in a free trade. 3. Wheat & flour the Staples of the two Middle States, (N. J. & Penna.)— 4 Tobo. the staple of Maryd. & Virginia & partly of N. Carolina. 5. Rice & Indigo, the staples of S. Carolina & Georgia. These different interests would be a source of oppressive regulations if no check to a bare majority should
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article XXIII: Remaining Part - Morris to Strike Out "Choose the President"
It was moved and seconded to strike the words “choose the President of the United States and” out of the 23rd article which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 8; noes — 2; divided — 1.]
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause
Mr. Gorham disapproved of making the next highest after the President, the vice-President, without referring the decision to the Senate in case the next highest should have less than a majority of votes. as the regulation stands a very obscure man with very few votes may arrive at that appointment Mr Sherman said the object of this clause of the report of the Committee was to get rid of the ineligibility, which was attached to the mode of election by the Legislature, & to render the Executive
The Report made yesterday as to the appointment of the Executive being then taken up. Mr. Pinkney renewed his opposition to the mode, arguing 1. that the electors will not have sufficient knowledge of the fittest men, & will be swayed by an attachment to the eminent men of their respective States — Hence 2dly the dispersion of the votes would leave the appointment with the Senate, and as the President’s reappointment will thus depend on the Senate he will be the mere creature of that body. 3. He
Col. Mason admitted that there were objections to an appointment by the Legislature as originally planned. He had not yet made up his mind; but would state his objections to the mode proposed by the Committee. 1. It puts the appointment in fact into the hands of the Senate, as it will rarely happen that a majority of the whole votes will fall on any one candidate: and as the Existing President will always be one of the 5 highest, his re-appointment will of course depend on the Senate. 2. Conside
Mr Madison considered it as a primary object to render an eventual resort to any part of the Legislature improbable. He was apprehensive that the proposed alteration would turn the attention of the large States too much to the appointment of candidates, instead of aiming at an effectual appointment of the officer, as the large States would predominate in the Legislature which would have the final choice out of the Candidates. Whereas if the Senate in which the small States predominate should hav
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - King/Gerry to Insert Federal Qualifications of Electors
Mr. Gerry proposed, as the President was to be elected by the Senate out of the five highest candidates, that if he should not at the end of his term be re-elected by a majority of the Electors, and no other candidate should have a majority, the eventual election should be made by the Legislature — This he said would relieve the President from his particular dependence on the Senate for his continuance in office. Mr. King liked the idea, as calculated to satisfy particular members & promote u
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Spaight/Williamson for Seven Year Presidential Term
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Question on Vice President
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause Referring the Eventual Appointment of the President to the Senate Removed
From Madison's Notes: "Question on the clause referring the eventual appointment of the President to the Senate." Editors' note: Since this clause is already part of the text of the Remaining Parts amendment, the vote to approve it will be represented by an amendment to remove the text, a vote to approve its being removed, an amendment to reinsert the text, and a vote to approve the reinsertion.
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause Referring the Eventual Appointment of the President to the Senate Reinserted
On a question on the clause referring the eventual appointment of the President to the Senate N— H— ay. Mas. ay. Ct. ay. N. J. ay. Pa ay. Del— ay— Va ay. N. C. no Here the call ceased. Editors' note: Farrand suspects that this stand-alone vote in the Journal, "[ Ayes — 10; noes — 1]", belongs to this question. Therefore, this account of the vote will be followed here.
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Madison/Pinckney for Two-Thirds of Senators Present
Mr. Gorham thought it a wrong principle to require more than a majority in any case. In the present case it might prevent for a long time any choice of a President.
Mr. Williamson suggested as better than an eventual choice by the Senate, that this choice should be made by the Legislature, voting by States and not per capita. Mr. Sherman suggested the House of Reps. as preferable to “the Legislature”, and moved, accordingly, To strike out the words “The Senate shall immediately choose &c.” and insert “The House of Representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President, the members from each State having one vote.”
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Sherman to Replace Senate with House of Representatives
It was moved and seconded to strike out the words “The Senate shall immediately choose by ballot” &ca and to insert the words “The House of representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President, the Members from each State having one vote” which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 10; noes — 1.] Editors' note: Massachusetts has returned, bringing the number of voting delegations to eleven.
Mr. Govr Morris suggested the idea of providing that in all cases, the President in office, should not be one of the five Candidates; but be only re-eligible in case a majority of the electors should vote for him— (This was another expedient for rendering the President independent of the Legislative body for his continuance in office) Mr. Madison remarked that as a majority of members wd. make a quorum in the H— of Reps. it would follow from the amendment of Mr Sherman giving the election to
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause on Vice President Removed
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Remaining Parts: Clause on Vice President Reinserted
The several amendments being agreed to, on separate questions, The first sect. of the report is as follows. “He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and together with the Vice President, chosen for the same term, be elected in the following manner. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as it’s legislature may direct, a number of Electors equal to the whole number of Senators and Members of the House of representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Legislat
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Randolph on Acting Presidents
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Randolph on Acting Presidents: Madison's Amendment
Mr. Madison observed that this, as worded, would prevent a supply of the vacancy by an intermediate election of the President, and moved to substitute — “until such disability be removed, or a President shall be elected —” Mr. Governr. Morris 2ded. the motion, which was agreed to. Editors' note: No vote count is provided.
It was moved and seconded to insert the following clause after the words “throughout the United States” in the first sect. of the report. “The Legislature may declare by law what officer of the United States shall act as President in case of the death, resignation, or disability of the President and Vice President; and such Officer shall act accordingly, until such disability be removed, or a President shall be elected” which passed in the affirmative [Ayes — 6; noes — 4; divided — 1.]
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Fourth Clause - Gerry's Amendment on Attendance for Election by the House
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Qualifications of President
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Vice President to be President of Senate
Mr. Gerry opposed this regulation. We might as well put the President himself at the head of the Legislature. The close intimacy that must subsist between the President & vice-president makes it absolutely improper. He was agst. having any vice President. Mr Govr Morris. The vice president then will be the first heir apparent that ever loved his father — If there should be no vice president, the President of the Senate would be temporary successor, which would amount to the same thing. Mr
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Role of the Vice President
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Treaties
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Treaties - Wilson for Advice and Consent of House
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Ambassadors and Public Ministers
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Ambassadors and Foreign Ministers
Mr. Wilson objected to the mode of appointing, as blending a branch of the Legislature with the Executive. Good laws are of no effect without a good Executive; and there can be no good Executive without a responsible appointment of officers to execute. Responsibility is in a manner destroyed by such an agency of the Senate — He would prefer the Council proposed by Col: Mason, provided its advice should not be made obligatory on the President Mr. Pinkney was against joining the Senate in these
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Ambassadors and Public Ministers
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Supreme Court Judges
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Other Officers
Col: Mason said that in rejecting a Council to the President we were about to try an experiment on which the most despotic Governments had never ventured— The Grand Signor himself had his Divan. He moved to postpone the consideration of the clause in order to take up the following “That it be an instruction to the Committee of the States to prepare a clause or clauses for establishing an Executive Council, as a Council of State for the President of the U. States, to consist of six members, tw
Motion to postpone in order to create an executive council.
Mr. Govr. Morris. The question of a Council was considered in the Committee, where it was judged that the Presidt. by persuading his Council— to concur in his wrong measures, would acquire their protection for them— Mr. Wilson approved of a Council, in preference to making the Senate a party to appointmts. Mr. Dickinson was for a Council. It wd. be a singular thing if the measures of the Executive were not to undergo some previous discussion before the President Mr Madison was in favor
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Spaight's Motion on Vacancies
It was moved and seconded to agree to the following clause That the President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of the next session of the Senate. which passed in the affirmative. Editors' note: Madison writes "nem. con.".
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Madison to Insert "Except Treaties of Peace"
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Madison on Peace Treaties
Mr Gorham thought the precaution unnecessary as the means of carrying on the war would not be in the hands of the President, but of the Legislature. Mr. Govr Morris thought the power of the President in this case harmless; and that no peace ought to be made without the concurrence of the President, who was the general Guardian of the National interests. Mr. Butler was strenuous for the motion, as a necessary security against ambitious & corrupt Presidents. He mentioned the late perfidious
To agree to the last question Ayes — 11; noes — 0. Editors' note: Madison writes, "On the question, “authorizing the President to call for the opinions of the Heads of Departments, in writing:” it passed in the affirmative, N. H. only being no. The clause was then unanimously agreed to." New Hampshire's vote will be recorded as uncertain, it being unclear whether two votes were taken.
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Williamson/Spaight on Territorial Rights
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Williamson/Spaight on Territorial Rights: King's Amendment
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - King's Motion to Strike Out "Except Treaties of Peace"
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Rutledge and Gerry's Amendment
Mr. Ghorum. There is a difference in the case, as the President’s consent will also be necessary in the new Govt.
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Sherman for Majority of Senate
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties - Madison's Amendment
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Section on Powers of the President: Two Thirds Consent to Treaties: Gerry/Williamson Amendment
Second Report of the Grand Committee on Postponed Questions: Article X - Second Amendment to Section 2
Mr. Madison, objected to a trial of the President by the Senate, especially as he was to be impeached by the other branch of the Legislature, and for any act which might be called a misdemesnor. The President under these circumstances was made improperly dependent. He would prefer the supreme Court for the trial of impeachments, or rather a tribunal of which that should form a part. Mr Govr Morris thought no other tribunal than the Senate could be trusted. The Supreme Court were too few in nu
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article X: Section 2 - VP Added to Impeachment Clause
It was moved and seconded to add the following clause after the words “United States” “The Vice President and other civil Officers of the United States shall be removed from Office on impeachment and conviction as aforesaid” which passed in the affirmative [“unanimous”]
Mr. McHenry observed that the President had not yet been any where authorized to convene the Senate, and moved to amend Art X. sect. 2. by striking out the words “He may convene them (the Legislature) on extraordinary occasions” & insert “He may convene both or either of the Houses on extraordinary occasions” — This he added would also provide for the case of the Senate being in Session at the time of convening the Legislature. Mr. Wilson said he should vote agst the motion because it implied
Mr. Sherman opposed it— he thought the provision on that subject amply sufficient. Col: Hamilton expressed himself with great earnestness and anxiety in favor of the motion. He avowed himself a friend to a vigorous Government, but would declare at the same time, that he held it essential that the popular branch of it should be on a broad foundation. He was seriously of opinion that the House of Representatives was on so narrow a scale as to be really dangerous, and to warrant a jealousy in th
Randolph's Resolution on Ratification
Mr. Williamson moved to reconsider the clause requiring three fourths of each House to overrule the negative of the President, in order to strike out ¾ and insert ⅔. He had he remarked himself proposed ¾ instead of ⅔, but he had since been convinced that the latter proportion was the best. The former puts too much in the power of the President. Mr. Sherman was of the same opinion; adding that the States would not like to see so small a minority and the President, prevailing over the general v
Report of the Committee of Detail [Resolutions] - Article VI: Section 13 - Williamson for Two Thirds Consent to Override Presidential Veto
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 1: Section 7 - Madison to Insert "The Day on Which"
Mr. Madison — The President is made too dependent already on the Legislature, by the power of one branch to try him in consequence of an impeachment by the other. This intermediate suspension, will put him in the power of one branch only — They can at any moment, in order to make way for the functions of another who will be more favorable to their views, vote a temporary removal of the existing magistrate — Mr. King concurred in the opposition to the amendment.
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 1 - Sixth Clause
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 1 - Seventh Clause: Rutledge/Franklin Amendment
Mr. Rutlidge and Docr Franklin moved to annex to the end paragraph 7. sect. 1. art II— “and he (the President) shall not receive, within that period, any other emolument from the U. S. or any of them.” on which question N— H. ay— Mas. ay. Ct. no. N. J. no. Pa ay. Del. no. Md. ay— Va. ay. N. C. no. S— C. ay. Geo— ay. [Ayes — 7; noes — 4.]
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 2 - Randolph to Prohibit Pardon in Cases of Treason
Mr Govr Morris had rather there should be no pardon for treason, than let the power devolve on the Legislature. Mr Wilson. Pardon is necessary for cases of treason, and is best placed in the hands of the Executive. If he be himself a party to the guilt he can be impeached and prosecuted. Mr. King thought it would be inconsistent with the Constitutional separation of the Executive & Legislative powers to let the prerogative be exercised by the latter — A Legislative body is utterly unfit fo
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 2 - Second Clause: Morris/Sherman's Amendment
Report of the Committee of Style - Article 2: Section 1 - Third Clause: Journal Amendments
Report of the Committee of Style - Presidential Oath of Office: Journal Amendment
Mr. Pinkney. These declarations from members so respectable at the close of this important scene, give a peculiar solemnity to the present moment. He descanted on the consequences of calling forth the deliberations & amendments of the different States on the subject of Government at large. Nothing but confusion & contrariety could spring from the experiment. The States will never agree in their plans— And the Deputies to a second Convention coming together under the discordant impressions of the
There is no Declaration of Rights, and the laws of the general government being paramount to the laws and constitution of the several States, the Declaration of Rights in the separate States are no security. Nor are the people secured even in the enjoyment of the benefit of the common law. In the House of Representatives there is not the substance but the shadow only of representation; which can never produce proper information in the legislature, or inspire confidence in the people; the laws
Docr. Franklin rose with a speech in his hand, which he had reduced to writing for his own conveniency, and which Mr. Wilson read in the words following. Mr. President I confess that there are several parts of this constitution which I do not at present approve, but I am not sure I shall never approve them: For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged by better information or fuller consideration, to change opinions even on important subjects, which I once thou
When the President rose, for the purpose of putting the question, he said that although his situation had hitherto restrained him from offering his sentiments on questions depending in the House, and it might be thought, ought now to impose silence on him, yet he could not forbear expressing his wish that the alteration proposed might take place. It was much to be desired that the objections to the plan recommended might be made as few as possible — The smallness of the proportion of Representat
Motion to deposit the Journals and papers with the President.
A question was then put on depositing the Journals and other papers of the Convention in the hands of the President, On which, N— H— ay. Mtts ay. Ct. ay— N. J. ay. Pena. ay. Del. ay. Md. no. Va. ay. N. C. ay— S. C. ay. Geo. ay. [Ayes 10; noes — 1.] Editors' note: Madison notes that 'This negative of Maryland was occasioned by the language of the instructions to the Deputies of that State, which required them to report to the State, the proceedings of the Convention.'
Resolution that the President retain the Journal.
Motion to Elect a President pro tempore
Also tagged as: Senate
'The Senate then proceeded by ballot to the choice of a President of their body, pro tempore.'
Also tagged as: Senate
'The Senate then proceeded by ballot to the choice of a President of their body, pro tempore. John Langdon, Esq. was duly elected.'
Also tagged as: Senate
Letter from the Senate - 16 April
Also tagged as: House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, Taken, Papers, Take, Houses, Rules, Cases, Respecting
'The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Honorable John Langdon, President pro tempore of the Senate, communicating the appointment of two committees of that House, agreeably to the report of the committee of both Houses, agreed to yesterday; which was read, and ordered to lie on the table.'
Also tagged as: Houses, House, Senate
'On motion, Resolved, That the following be subjoined to the standing orders of the Senate: XX. Before any petition or memorial, addressed to the Senate, shall be received and read at the table, whether the same shall be introduced by the President, or a member, a brief statement of the contents of the petition or memorial shall verbally be made by the introducer.'
Also tagged as: Following, Senate, Petition, Resolved
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: United, House, States
'Upon motion of Mr. White, referring to the arrival of the President, the House adjourned until to-tomorrow' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 25 April 1789, 14).
Also tagged as: United, House, States
Implied Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: United, Congress, States
'This being the day on which the President of the United States was inaugurated no other business, of course, was attended to' (Annals of Congress, 1st. Cong., 1st sess., 241).
Also tagged as: Congress, United, States
Implied Motion to Rise and Report Progress
Also tagged as: House, Congress, Resolved, Rights, Following, Adopting
'The honorable Pierce Butler, from the state of South Carolina, appeared, produced his credentials, and took his seat in the Senate. The Vice President administered the oath to Mr. Butler.'
Also tagged as: Oath, State, Senate
Madison's Proposed Amendments
Also tagged as: Use, Prevent, State, Disparage, Exercise, Freedom, Representative, Confidence, Liberty, Respecting, Time, Proposed, Things, Violated, Fourth, Amendment, Others, States, Establishment, United, Public, Order, Favor, Arising, Abridging, Government, Ratified, Right, Rights, Articles, Number, Fifth, Senate, Taken, Take, Conventions, Value, America, Required, Houses, Persons, Danger, First, Answer, House, Case, Controversy, Certain, Make, Constitution, Amendments, People, Necessary, Ground, Representatives, Legislatures, Court, Subject, Secure, Suits, Thirty, Enumeration, Press, Defence, Criminal, Thousand, Delegated, Security, Compelled, Fact, Best, Common, Retained, Compensation, Place, Purposes, Jury, Trial, Nature, Proportion, Warrants, Obtaining, Cases, Added, Reserved, Law, Congress, Exceed, Effect, Powers, Service, Varying, Several, Part, Put
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
Motion to Appoint the Committee for Enrolled Bills
Also tagged as: Congress
Implied Motion to Appoint a Member to the Committee for Enrolled Bills
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Informed, Houses, Time
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation. Ordered, That the Clerk of this House do acquaint the Senate therewith.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Beckley, their Clerk: who informed the Senate that "the House of Representatives had appointed Mr. White and Mr. Partridge, with such as the Senate may join, a standing committee, to examine the enrollment of all hills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and, after being signed by the President of the Senate, and Speaker of the House of Representatives, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States;" [...] The Senate p
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Informed, Houses, Time
'The Senate proceeded to appoint Mr. Wingate a committee on their part, to examine and present to the President of the United States the enrolled bills that may pass the Senate and House of Representatives from time to time.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Time
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'The Senate proceeded to appoint Mr. Wingate a committee on their part, to examine and present to the President of the United States the enrolled bills that may pass the Senate and House of Representatives from time to time.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Representatives, Part, States, Time
'Ordered, That Mr. White and Mr. Partridge be appointed a standing committee on the part of this House, jointly, with any committee of the Senate, to examine the enrolments of all bills, as the same shall pass the two Houses, and after being signed by the Speaker of this House, and the President of the Senate, to present them forthwith to the President of the United States, for his approbation.'
Also tagged as: United, House, Senate, Part, States, Houses
'Mr. LIVERMORE was clearly of opinion, that whatever amendments were made to the constitution, they ought to stand separate from the original instrument. We have no right, said he, to alter a clause, any otherwise than by a new proposition. We have well-established precedents for such a mode of procedure in the practice of the British Parliament and the State Legislatures throughout America. I do not mean, however, to assert that there has been no instance of a repeal of the whole law on enactin
Also tagged as: Defence, Senate, Others, Taken, States, Valid, Take, Conventions, Use, Fact, Best, Retained, Place, Original, Purposes, United, America, Public, Less, State, Order, Houses, Favor, Cases, Exercise, First, Assembled, Law, House, Government, Congress, Oath, Case, Effect, Liberty, Certain, Make, Ratified, Constitution, Powers, Right, Amendments, Respecting, Necessary, People, Time, Ground, Several, Proposed, Representatives, Intents, Rights, Things, Legislatures, Consent, Secure, Subject, Addition, Desire, Preserved, Part, Put, Adopting, Number, Amendment, Fifth, Construed
Mr. TUCKER.—I presume these propositions are brought forward under the idea of being amendments to the constitution; but can this be esteemed an amendment of the constitution? If I understand what is meant by the introductory paragraph, it is the preamble to the constitution; but a preamble is no part of the constitution. It is, to say the best, a useless amendment. For my part, I should as soon think of amending the concluding part, consisting of General Washington's letter to the President of
Also tagged as: Others, Taken, States, Conventions, Establishment, Expressed, Fact, Best, Place, Original, United, America, State, Exercise, Added, House, Congress, Certain, Constitution, Right, Amendments, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Addition, Desire, Part, Amendment
'The question on the first paragraph of the report was put and carried in the affirmative, twenty-seven to twenty-three' (Annals of Congress, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 746-47). *** 'Some progress was made in the discussion of the report of the select committee.—The question on the first paragraph, after a short debate, was put and carried in the affirmative' (Gazette of the United States, edition of 15 August 1789, 143). *** 'Mr. TUCKER observed, that the preamble is no part of the Const
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Congress, Proposed, Part, States, Put, Constitution, Right, People, Amendment, Amendments, Original, Necessary
‘Mr. AMES said, that inadequate regulations were equally injurious as having none, and that such an amendment as was now proposed would alter the constitution; it would vest the supreme authority in places where it was never contemplated. Mr. SHERMAN observed, that the Convention were very unanimous in passing this clause; that it was an important provision, and if it was resigned it would tend to subvert the Government. Mr. MADISON was willing to make very amendment that was required by t
Also tagged as: Others, States, Take, Prevent, Senators, United, America, Required, Public, Less, State, Prohibited, Order, Danger, First, Law, House, Government, Congress, Effect, Certain, Make, Powers, Constitution, Right, Amendments, Time, People, Necessary, Proposed, Rights, Legislatures, Secure, Subject, Number, Amendment, Election
Additional Proposed Amendment
Also tagged as: United, Person, House, Representatives, Proposed, Following, States, Articles, Constitution, Amendment
'On motion to add the following clause to the articles of amendment to the constitution of the United States, proposed by the House of Representatives, to wit: "That no person shall be capable of being President of the United States for more than eight years in any term of sixteen years:" It passed in the negative.'
Also tagged as: United, Person, House, Representatives, Proposed, Following, States, Articles, Constitution, Amendment
Resolution that President Send Copies of Amendments to the States
Also tagged as: Assembled, Several, United, House, Senate, Congress, Proposed, Resolved, Representatives, States, Ratified, Constitution, Added, Amendments
Motion to Send Copies of Amendments to the States
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Senate, Congress, Proposed, Representatives, States, Informed, Ratified, Constitution, Added, Amendments
'The Senate proceeded to consider the resolve of the House of Representatives of the 24th instant, to wit: "In the House of Representatives, "Thursday, the 24th, September, 1789. "Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be requested to transmit to the executives of the United States, which have ratified the constitution copies of the amendments proposed by Congress, to be added the
Also tagged as: Assembled, United, House, Senate, Congress, Proposed, Resolved, Representatives, States, Ratified, Constitution, Added, Amendments
'Ordered, That the Secretary do carry a message to the House of Representatives accordingly' (U.S. Senate Journal, 1st Cong., 1st sess., 26 September 1789). *** 'A message from the Senate, by Mr. Otis, their Secretary: Mr. Speaker: The Senate have agreed to the resolution desiring the President of the United States to recommend a day of general thanksgiving; also, to the resolution desiring the President of the United States to transmit to the Executives of the several States in the Un
Also tagged as: Several, United, House, Senate, Congress, Representatives, States, Constitution, Amendments
Call to Order/Prayer: 1895-03-04
Also tagged as: Convention, Act
Mr. CRANE. What is the further pleasure of the Convention? Mr. CANNON. Mr. Chairman, I take pleasure in nominating as temporary president of this Convention, the Honorable James N. Kimball, of Weber County. Mr. Kimball was then unanimously elected as temporary president, and was greeted with applause as he ascended the platform.
Also tagged as: County, Elected, Convention
Mr. EICHNOR. Mr. President, for temporary secretary, I nominate Mr. Heber M. Wells, of Salt Lake. Mr. Wells was unanimously elected to the position.
Also tagged as: Salt, Elected, Secretary
Mr. SYMONS. Mr. President, I nominate J. F. Chidester, of Garfield County, for temporary sergeant-at-arms. Mr. Chidester was unanimously elected.
Also tagged as: County, Elected
Mr. VAN HORNE. Mr. President, I move you that the chair appoint a committee of five on privileges, elections, and qualifications of members. Mr. IVINS. Mr. President, does the gentlemen mean that this committee of five have control of all these different matters, or that a committee of five in each of these different departments be appointed? Mr. VAN HORNE. One committee, is the motion, Mr. President. Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, it seems to me that the usual and precedented order of business a
Also tagged as: Belonging, Business, Appoint, Matters, Elections, Control, Members, Second
Motion to Appoint a Committee of Five
Also tagged as: Second, Appoint
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Convention
Motion to Recess for an Hour
Also tagged as: Make, Taken
Motion to Adjourn Until Tomorrow
The motion was agreed to, and the Convention took an informal recess of one hour, after which it was called to order by the president pro tem.
Also tagged as: Convention
Announcement of delegates appointed to the Committee on Credentials
Also tagged as: Convention
Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. President, as a member of that committee, I would like to know the sense of the house as to what are the duties, and what is expected of them. I do not know whether I understand the extent of the power that is intended to be given to that committee. The PRESIDENT pro tem. I assume that it is to pass upon credentials. Mr. EVANS (Weber). I want to know whether it is expected that that committee will pass upon the contests or not? The PRESIDENT pro tem. I did not so unders
Also tagged as: Power, House, Law, Pass, Made, According, Duties, Member, Entitled
Call to Order 03-05-1895 10:30:00
Also tagged as: Convention
Mr. JOLLEY. Mr. President, before we proceed, I would like to say that J. L. Jolley and Mr. Peterson went down to the Chief Justice and took the oath. If it is necessary, we will take it again. The PRESIDENT pro tem. That is not necessary, I think, sir.
Also tagged as: Necessary, Justice
Mr. CHRISTIANSON. Mr. President, I, in connection with Mr. Jolley, took the oath yesterday. Mr. PIERCE. Mr. President, I would suggest that the records ought to be amended in such a way as to show that these two gentlemen took the oath, that our record would be complete; and they would prima facie be entitled to participate in the proceedings; otherwise, the record would not show that they had taken the oath. The PRESIDENT pro tem. That oath was taken privately, was it, before the Chief Justic
Also tagged as: Taken, Justice, Entitled, Office, Proceedings
Power to investigate
Also tagged as: Second, Third, Lake, City, Salt, Qualification, Power
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, before the vote is taken on this question, I desire to make some observations to the assembly in support of the points that I shall make; that you are absolutely without jurisdiction in the premises. It is true, a body of this kind has the physical power; a member may cast his vote through and because of his own volition to do an act which, joined with the votes of others, may result in the consummation of something; but he has not or may not have the legal right to do
Also tagged as: Election, Convention, Law, Evidence, Elected, Time, Legislative, Member, Determine, Case, Day, Territory, Made, People, Right, Act, Judge, Person, Persons, House, Members, Duty, First, Authority, Make, Vote, Seat, Sufficient, Proceedings, Votes, Jurisdiction, Subject, Government, United, Officer, Entitled, States, Cases, Laws, Qualification, Claims, Office, Congress, Place, Third, City, Legislature, Authorize, Proposition, Elections, Remain, Public, Terms, Taken, Rights, Effect, State, Number, Support, Second, Absence, Pass, Common, Trial, Admitted, District, Control, Purpose, Houses, Utah, Power
Mr. VAN HORNE. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention, as the mover of the motion, it becomes my duty to speak to the question of whether it shall prevail or not. You have heard an argument against the motion. With you will rest the question of whether it is right, whether it is just, whether it is equitable, and whether it is legal, that that motion shall prevail. To begin with, I will say that, so far as I, the mover of the motion, was actuated, I made that motion with a full adheren
Also tagged as: Convention, Elected, Act, Power, Right, Members, Election, Seat, People, Time, Purpose, Evidence, Law, Constitution, State, Lake, Salt, Day, Made, Third, Part, House, Determine, Vote, Utah, Territory, States, Cases, Elections, Authority, Make, Persons, Majority, Congress, Member, Entitled, Board, Number, City, Days, Business, Legislative, County, Case, Duties, First, Receive, Judgment, Duty, Votes, Proposition, Government, United, Appoint, Pass, According, Necessary, Proposed, Holding, Subject, Perform, Proper, Nothing, Secretary, Taken, Proceedings, Rights, Jurisdiction, Justice, Admission, Issue, Judge, Provided, Office, Laws, Court, Consist, Monday, Legislature, Least, Qualification
Motion to Amend Previous Motion
Also tagged as: Seat, Made, Purpose, Members, Third, First
The CHAIRMAN. I didn't understand that the gentleman from Kane County yielded his motion. Mr. ROBINSON (Kane). No, sir; I haven't yielded, on the ground that the other committee should make its report before we can proceed in a proper manner. Mr. EICHNOR. Mr. President, I would request the gentleman from Kane County to withhold his motion for a little while. I understand the committee on credentials is ready to report. Mr. ROBINSON (Kane.) I will withhold it on that ground. Mr. ELDREDGE. Mr.
Also tagged as: County, Appoint, Number, Member, Convention, Make, Necessary
Power to investigate
Also tagged as: Power, Salt, Entitled, Following, City, Adoption, Cases, Evidence, Convention, Right, Second, Third, Lake
Moved a permanent president be selected.
Nomination of Mr. Smith for President
Also tagged as: Place, City, Third, Lake, Convention, Second, Salt
Close Nominations for President
Declare President by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Declared, House, Number
The CHAIRMAN. It has been moved and seconded that the rules be suspended and that John Henry Smith be declared permanent president of this Convention by acclamation. Those in favor of the same will say aye; contrary no. The ayes seem to have it.
Also tagged as: Declared, Convention
The CHAIRMAN. Now, let me understand_is this on the absolute vote or is it on the_ Mr. IVINS. It is on my motion that John Henry Smith be declared by acclamation to be the permanent president of this assembly.
Also tagged as: Declared, Vote
The CHAIRMAN. You have heard the motion, gentlemen, those in favor of John Henry Smith for president will stand up. The secretary pro tem. announced an affirmative vote of ninety. The CHAIRMAN. There being ninety in the affirmative, I believe it is not necessary to call the noes. Mr. John Henry Smith is declared permanent president. Mr. Squires and Mr. Roberts, will you conduct Mr. Smith to the chair? The gentlemen mentioned conducted Mr. Smith to the chair.
Also tagged as: Vote, Declared, Necessary, Secretary
Mr. John Henry Smith is declared permanent president.
President SMITH. Gentlemen of the Convention: It will be impossible for me to find words to express to you the feelings that are within my breast. For many years it has been a dream of mine that the day would yet come when the people of the Territory of Utah, burying their past differences, would strike hands upon common ground, and as lovers of the same great commonwealth put their hands to the plow of statehood and endeavor to bring the people of that commonwealth into the enjoyment of every r
Also tagged as: Made, Powers, Act, Constitution, Judgment, Perform, Trust, Government, Power, Become, Purpose, Days, Receive, Fixed, Day, Justice, Common, Taxation, Times, Territory, Pass, People, Matters, Support, States, Convention, Labor, Mines, Representatives, Time, Years, Law, Duty, Entered, Place, Part, State, Exercise, United, Utah, Duties, Right, Rights
Mr. TATLOCK. Mr. President, and gentlemen of the Convention: I am proud to salute a man who was born in the Territory, whose motto was “Our liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain.”On my way to the building this morning I was accosted by a number of your friends and my friends, the friends of this Convention, who imposed upon me the very pleasant and delicate duty of asking you to accept from them an emblem of your authority during the continuance of this Convention. The article whic
Also tagged as: Years, War, Salt, Duty, Territory, City, People, Made, Authority, Number, Grand, Trust, Part, State, Rights, Day, Necessary, Taken, Convention, Least, Lake
Convention Permanent Officers [Resolution No. 7.D]: Amendment
Also tagged as: Officers, Convention
Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, I understand that this committee appointed by the Convention yesterday to fix upon the number of committees which we shall need, during the progress of the Convention, is about ready to report, and I should judge that before we ruled out the election of three committee clerks, it would be wise to get the report of that committee and ascertain how many committees we have got to handle. I do not consider that it is possible for this Convention to get along without commi
Also tagged as: Convention, Sufficient, Member, Legislative, Amount, Paid, Appoint, Vote, Purpose, Necessary, Respective, Support, Case, Second, Times, Least, Dollars, Several, Use, Judge, Adoption, Day, Secretary, Reasons, Proper, Rate, Nothing, Compensation, Money, Provide, Officers, Business, Election, Number, Duties, Members, Time, First
Convention Permanent Officers [Resolution No. 7.D]: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Second, Effect, Convention, Officers, Official, Purpose
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, and gentlemen of the Convention, I think that that would not be necessary. The same object would be attained if the gentleman would wait until this is adopted, and in naming an official stenographer, if he so desire it could be referred to a committee of five. We certainly want an official stenographer. Mr. ROBERTS. It seems to me that if the gentleman offering the resolution contemplates the reference of the matter of the official stenographer to a committee, if he c
Also tagged as: Official, Convention, Receive, Necessary, Name, Fill, Officer, Subject, Fixed, Provided, Office, Provide, Power, House, State, Compensation, Officers
Convention Permanent Officers [Resolution No. 7.D]: Third Amendment
Also tagged as: Third, Convention, Officers, Providing
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, with the consent of my second I will accept that amendment.
Also tagged as: Second, Consent
Mr. THATCHER. Will you gentlemen kindly insert the words, “lady typewriters?” Mr. SQUIRES. I should be very glad Mr. President, when we come to select those clerks if there are lady candidates to give my vote for them.
Also tagged as: Vote
Election of Officers
Also tagged as: Election, Officers
Nomination of Mr. Christensen
Also tagged as: County, Second, Convention
Election by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Election
Appointments to Bring Mr. Christensen Forward
Also tagged as: Seat, Appoint
Mr. PIERCE. Mr. President, wouldn't it save time to elect all that we are to elect and have them sworn in at the same time?
Also tagged as: Time
The PRESIDENT. Yes; we will let the temporary secretary then retain his seat.
Also tagged as: Seat, Secretary
All Naming and Voting be Done at Once
Also tagged as: Offices, Taken, Voting, Make, Vote, Respective
Nomination for Minute Clerk
Also tagged as: County, Name
Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, in order to put them in a way that we can get them all at once, I respectfully request that Mr. Cannon rise and read the names of those candidates that were elected. [Laughter.] If we are going to save time, Mr. President, that is the best way to save time.
Also tagged as: Time, Elected
Not Consider the Committee Clerks at Present
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, that motion has already been passed upon.
Also tagged as: Passed
The PRESIDENT. That motion has been passed upon.
Also tagged as: Passed
Mr. VARIAN. If the gentleman voted in the affirmative, he is not entitled to reconsider, because that motion was lost on a negative vote. Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, as a matter of fact there are no candidates before this Convention this morning for those three places, consequently the motion would not be necessary. [Laughter.]
Also tagged as: Vote, Places, Entitled, Necessary, Convention
Point of Order: Mr. Eldredge Out of Order
Move to Reconsider the Motion
Also tagged as: House, Adoption
Mr. THURMAN. Mr. President, there are some of us here who for some reason did not have notice of a caucus yesterday afternoon. If some gentleman who was there will state what they did there we can probably adopt it as a whole. [Laughter.] The PRESIDENT. As I understand the situation at the present time, it is, Mr. Eldredge moved to reconsider the question of passing upon this at once, having voted in favor of it. Mr. WILLIAMS. Mr. President, may I ask a question? Mr. THATCHER. I move as an am
Also tagged as: Name, State, Provide, Following, Time
Ignore Appointment of Committee Clerks.
Also tagged as: Time, Consent, Convention
Mr. BUTTON. Mr. President, I would like to have Mr. Varian, as mover of that motion, leave out the stenographer too. Mr. VARIAN. No; that has been decided. I don't care to do that. I am in favor of a stenographer. I think it is useless to dwell on that subject. Mr. BOWDLE. Mr. President, I move you to amend the resolution offered by the gentleman from Salt Lake by striking out the word “stenographer.” Mr. ROBERTS. I second the amendment.
Also tagged as: Subject, Salt, Second, Lake
Point of Order: Mr. Eldredge's Motion Out of Order
Also tagged as: Consent, House, Made, Elected, Effect, Officers, Vote
Reconsideration of Vote
Also tagged as: Vote, Officers
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, I arise for information. Is the resolution which you desire to reconsider the one offered by Mr. Varian? Mr. VAN HORNE. Yes, sir. Mr. ROBERTS. Mr. President, for information, I would like to know if the question before the house is upon the unanimous consent for the consideration of Mr. Varian's resolution to eliminate the three committee clerks? Mr. VAN HORNE. Mr. President, I understood that was adopted. Mr. President, I will say for the benefit of the gentleman,
Also tagged as: Time, Convention, Made, Business, Vote, Consent, Connected, Regular, Purpose, Place, Make, House, Offices, Fixed, Officers
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, in view of the fact that a motion was made to reconsider I will withdraw mine.
Also tagged as: Made
Proceed with Singular Elections
Also tagged as: Officers, Time, Elections
Nomination of Engrossing Clerk
Also tagged as: Name
Point of Order: Not the Order of Business
Also tagged as: Business
Election by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Election
Nomination of Sergeant-at-Arms
Also tagged as: Convention
Nomination of Watchman and Janitor
Election by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Election
Suspension of Rules for Duration
Also tagged as: Case
Mr. IVINS. Mr. President, if the president will permit me to suggest, I regard it as unnecessary to put this question, whether the rules will be suspended unless there is some objection. If there is a motion to suspend the rules, the chair might say, unless there is an objection, the rules are suspended and go right on and elect these officers.
Also tagged as: Right, Officers
Nomination for Messenger
Also tagged as: Name
Renomination for Engrossment Clerk
Also tagged as: Places, Territory, Amount
Nomination for Engrossing and Enrolling Clerk
Also tagged as: County, Name, Second, Place
Mr. KIESEL. Mr. President, I desire to know for information which of these is on the slate. Mr. EICHNOR. Smith. The PRESIDENT. I am not prepared myself to say. Mr. NEBEKER. Mr. President, I arise in support of the nomination of Mr. Pratt. As the Convention has proceeded as a sort of a ratification meeting, at this point I shall try and break the monotony by voting for Mr. Pratt.
Also tagged as: Voting, Convention, Support
Motion Seconded
Also tagged as: Nothing, Second, Days, Business
Mr. ANDERSON. Mr. President, I can say in behalf of Joseph A. Smith, that he is well qualified and a good, competent man and will fill the place with honor and ability if elected.
Also tagged as: Fill, Elected, Qualified, Place
Nomination for Engrossing and Enrolling Clerk
Also tagged as: Place, County
Mr. LOW (Cache). I have this to say, Mr. President, in favor of the nominee from Cache County; he is the slated member for this position, he is the gentleman from Cache and should be supported by this Convention. Mr. THURMAN. Mr. President, I regret to say that we have come to the dividing roads, and I will have to part company with the caucus on this question. I have stood by the caucus faithfully, manfully I trust, although they omitted by an oversight yesterday to notify me that the caucus w
Also tagged as: Part, Support, Convention, County, Member, Trust
Mr. CORAY. Mr. President, I understand we suspended the rules here to apply to each nomination. The PRESIDENT. Until objection was made, Mr. Coray. Mr. MALONEY. Mr. President, the proper thing to do is to call the roll, when there are three candidates. The PRESIDENT. The question is, shall the nominations close?
Also tagged as: Proper, Made
The PRESIDENT. The nominees before this Convention are Milando Pratt, Joseph A. Smith and Newton Farr. Mr. CRANE. Mr. President, I move that as the roll is called each man names the candidate he desires for this position. Mr. PIERCE. That is correct. The following was the vote on the roll call: Mr. GOODWIN. Mr. President, may I be permitted to explain my vote? The PRESIDENT. Yes, sir. Mr. GOODWIN. It was represented to a few of us that Cache County had set its heart on Mr. Smith; that i
Also tagged as: Vote, Change, Lake, Name, Salt, Votes, County, Cast, Time, Secretary, Made, Place, Authorized, Remain, Following, Pardon, Second, Reasons, Elected, Officer, Convention, Voting, Evidence, Objections
Request of Leave
Also tagged as: Voting, Election, Place, Following
The PRESIDENT. If there is no objection the gentleman will be granted his leave of absence. [As with the motion it decides, this decision took place during the voting for the election of the engrossing and enrolling clerk.]
Also tagged as: Place, Voting, Absence, Election, Granted
Mr. BOYER. Mr. President, in my sympathy with the man who is bereft of a dear friend, in behalf of myself and others, I would like to know his name and county. Mr. CHRISTIANSON. My name is Parley Christianson, of Mayfield, Sanpete County. [As with the motion it links to, this dialogue took place during the voting for the election of the engrossing and enrolling clerk.]
Also tagged as: Name, County, Voting, Election, Place
The PRESIDENT. Mr. Smith is elected.
Also tagged as: Elected
Suspension of Rules and Extension of Condolence
Also tagged as: County, Convention
Mr. EICHNOR. No, no, let us finish. Mr. JOLLEY. I suppose it is understood that Mr. Christianson is excused, is it not? The PRESIDENT. Yes, sir. Mr. EVANS (Weber). Has the chairman declared the vote? The CHAIRMAN. There is a motion for adjournment, has there been a second to it?
Also tagged as: Vote, Second, Declared
Vote be Made Unanimous
Also tagged as: Made, Election, Vote
The PRESIDENT. The next order of business is the election of one official stenographer and typewriter.
Also tagged as: Official, Election, Business
Creation of Committee on Stenographer
Also tagged as: Official, Convention, Right, Time, Admitted
Mr. ROBERTS. I would have it understood, Mr. President, that that includes the consideration of compensation for the stenographer. Mr. BOWDLE. Does that contemplate the employment of the stenographer by this committee of five? Mr. ROBERTS. No, sir. The PRESIDENT. Just a report upon it_the compensation and all things attendant upon it. Mr. BOWDLE. And make a report to this body? The PRESIDENT. Yes, sir. Mr. SQUIRES. I understand that this Convention has once voted against the motion made by
Also tagged as: Time, Make, House, Election, Business, Made, Compensation, Convention, Vote
Pass the Question
Also tagged as: Pass
The PRESIDENT. There is no second to that.
Also tagged as: Second
Mr. VARIAN. I hope this motion of Mr. Roberts will not prevail; the question of the compensation as was suggested in answer to my inquiry in relation to these offices can be settled hereafter. This Convention has now determined that it will have a stenographer. Let us name him and the Convention can fix the compensation afterwards. If there is any thought underlying in the Convention that we do not need a stenographer, it seems to me that the sooner we disabuse our minds of that impression the b
Also tagged as: Convention, House, Compensation, Business, Least, Vote, Name, Officer, Day, Money, Receive, Age, Made, Proceedings, Use, Proper, Place, Absence, Entitled, Reasons, Times, Equal, Legislative, Officers, Hereafter, State, Act, Third, Person, Due, Proposition, Days, Submitted, Justice, Offices, Subject, Paid, Salt, Matters
Point of Order: Not the Order of Business
Also tagged as: Business
Appointment of Committee on Stenographer
Also tagged as: Appoint
Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. President, I will ask to be excused from that on account of business I have out of the Convention. Otherwise I should be pleased to act. Mr. GOODWIN. Mr. President, Mr. Evans is not in the house, he was excused this morning.
Also tagged as: Act, House, Convention, Business
Replacement Appointment for Committee on Stenographer
Also tagged as: Appoint, Place
Nomination for Page
Also tagged as: Place
Nomination for Page
Also tagged as: Lake, Elected, Salt
Election of Pages by Acclamation
Also tagged as: Election, Lake, Elected, Salt
Nomination for Page
Also tagged as: City, Lake, Salt
Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, I withdraw my motion.
Motion to be Excused
Also tagged as: House, Consent
Election of Pages by Rising Vote
Also tagged as: Vote, Declared, Votes, Election, Number, Elected
Roll Call Vote for Election of Pages
Also tagged as: Vote, Time, Election
Seconding the Motion
Also tagged as: Second
Swear in Officers-Elect
Also tagged as: House
Carried. Minute clerk, Rapp, sergeant-at-arms, Clawson, watchman, Johnson, messenger, Watson, and pages, Thorne and Camp, were thereupon sworn in by the president.
Resolution on Adopting U.S. Constitution [Resolution No. 4A]
Also tagged as: Territory, Following, United, Constitution, States, Utah, Convention
Resolution No. 4A: Amendment
Also tagged as: Hereby, Following, People, Purpose, State, United, Constitution, States, Utah, Convention, Proposed
Mr. CRANE. I accept the amendment, Mr. President.
Resolution No. 4A: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Second, Amendments, United, States
Mr. EICHNOR. It is not necessary. The PRESIDENT. That covers the ground.
Also tagged as: Necessary
The PRESIDENT. That covers the ground.
Mr. GOODWIN. Mr. President, if the gentleman will withhold for a moment, I wish to explain that there was a committee sent out yesterday to investigate and suggest upon site and furniture for this house. If they might report then we might adjourn until to-morrow morning. Mr. PIERCE. Mr. President, that committee is ready to report. Mr. GOODWIN. There is one little matter; we haven't fixed about the chaplain.
Also tagged as: House, Fixed
President Choose a Chaplain Daily
Also tagged as: Authorized, Convention, Act
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, perhaps the gentleman wiil take a suggestion and add, “of the different denominations.” Mr. VAN HORNE. That was the purpose of the resolution, but I think we can safely leave that to our presiding officer.
Also tagged as: Officer, Purpose
Resolution No. 5B: Amendment
Also tagged as: Adoption
Adoption of Report with Minority Amendment
Also tagged as: Adoption
Mr. EICHNOR. Mr. President, I ask that they explain when they state a committee on compilation and arrangements, whether they mean a committee on revision. Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, I suggest there is a question before the house; I don't care to have this interjected in this manner.
Also tagged as: House, State
Mr. VARIAN. Now, Mr. President, the majority report offers a committee of twenty-six on apportionment and boundaries. A committee of twenty-six would be unnecessarily large and unwieldy. Fifteen is certainly large enough. if we expect to have executive work done and for that reason, it seems to me that the suggestion of the minority of the committee is a very proper one. And there is another reason, the counties differ in population, and material wealth. The proposition of the majority would all
Also tagged as: County, Lake, Salt, Majority, Counties, Convention, Territory, Member, Members, Proper, People, Power, Support, Least, Fifteen, Right, Representative, Amount, Nothing, Districts, Washington, Government, Number, Constitute, Legislature, Executive, Change, Made, Third, Proposition, Taken, Justice, San, House, Constitution
Adoption of the Majority Report
Also tagged as: Majority, Adoption, Effect
Mr. MURDOCK (Beaver). Mr. President, I object to the outside counties being called cow counties.
Also tagged as: Counties
Call to Order 03-07-1895
Also tagged as: Convention
The PRESIDENT. I will say that Mr. Thatcher asked to be excused on account of sickness in his family and was sent for.
Prayer: 03-07-1895
Also tagged as: State, Perform, Convention, County, San, Duty
The oath was then administered to Messrs. Preston and Robertson by the President.
The oath was then administered to Messrs. Preston and Robertson by the President.
Report on Site [Resolution No. 7A]
Also tagged as: Following, Secretary
Mr. RALEIGH. I second the motion. The PRESIDENT. Has there been a second to that motion? Mr. RICKS. Second the motion. Mr. GOODWIN. I hate to make my speech for fear no one will second it. There will not be a great many social entertainments in that house and we might just as well do penance there as to do it in this hall. I speak particularly on account of the outside public that they may have a place to see and hear. Mr. JAMES. Mr. President, I arise to second that motion. I have a furthe
Also tagged as: Subject, Made, Instruction, Taken, Judgment, County, Proper, Make, House, Sufficient, Day, Civil, Continue, Number, Convention, Members, Least, Second, Time, Salt, Court, Place, Part, Use, State, Public, Vote, Receive, Lake
Motion to Delay List of Committees
Also tagged as: Made, Part, State, Consist, Convention, Members, Government
Mr. PETERS. Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask the president how long a time he would desire to have in order that he can make out this report. The PRESIDENT. Well that is impossible for me to say. I have been working at it night and day nearly since we started. It is a big list of names and it is rather difficult to adjust them and get them properly and fairly distributed among the members, but I think by to-morrow, without any trouble, I can finish it. Mr. PIERCE. What time to-morrow? The P
Also tagged as: Time, Make, Day, Members
The convention accepted that the president would submit the list of committees late.
Also tagged as: Convention
Motion to Adjourn Until the Following Day at 2:00 PM
Also tagged as: Day, Following
Mr. NEBEKER. Before the adjournment is taken as a member of the committee on site and furniture The PRESIDENT. With the permission of the gentleman.
Also tagged as: Member, Taken
Mr. NEBEKER. The report does not carry any suggestions with it and I think that it would be well on the part of the Convention to decide to-day whether or not it will be necessary to have these desks, so that we can have them made and have the members seated as soon as possible. One day would be lost unless we took action to-day on that subject. The PRESIDENT. Are there any instructions to be given to this committee in regard to desks? Mr. C. P. LARSEN. Mr. President, I think that would be pre
Also tagged as: Convention, Day, Subject, Members, Necessary, Part, Remain, Made
Motion to Authorize Committee to Provide Accommodations
Also tagged as: Authorized, Authorize, Convention, Second, Members
Mr. JAMES. Mr. Chairman, before that motion is put, I want to say this, that if the motion is carried, it may somewhat interfere with our final location, and may provide us with some things that we do not want, and I hope that the motion will go over and the matter be referred back to the committee until to-morrow. Mr. IVINS. Mr. President, as the mover of that motion, it seems to me that there is no reason why it should not carry. It does not matter whether we meet here or somewhere else. We h
Also tagged as: Provide, Place, Final, Provided, Use, Members, Necessary
Adopt Resolution No. 8B
Also tagged as: Adoption
The PRESIDENT. The motion to fix a time takes precedence.
Also tagged as: Time
Mr. PIERCE. Mr. President, this is a motion to fix the time of holding our sessions for all the Convention, and mine is a motion simply to adjourn. If we want to fix the time to adjourn until to-morrow, whether it be ten or half past ten or eleven or two o'clock, it might be in order, but the motion of the gentleman from Cache County is wider and contemplates much more than a motion to adjourn to some particular time. The PRESIDENT. You make an amendment to that motion, do you? Mr. PIERCE. No
Also tagged as: Time, Vote, Make, Change, Part, Business, County, Regular, Holding, Passed, Submitted, Convention, Right, Matters, Secretary
The PRESIDENT. The question is now on the motion on the resolution of Mr. Hart.
Motion to Refer Proposal to Committee on Rules and Method Procedures.
Mr. VAN HORNE. I would ask for information, having been away at the beginning of the session. Has the committee on rules been appointed? The PRESIDENT. Yes, sir. Mr. VAN HORNE. I second the motion, Mr. President.
Also tagged as: Second
Read: Resolution No. 4A
Also tagged as: Convention, Subject, Part, Proceedings, Following, Day
Resolution to Adopt Constitution [Resolution No. 9C]
Also tagged as: Convention, Second, Adoption, Make, Following, Declared, Part, Territory, State, Act, Constitution, Utah, Government
Mr. ROBERTS. Mr. President, it seems to me that we ought to be careful in making up the record of the Convention's proceedings, and in so important a matter as the adoption of the Constitution on behalf of our constituents, that we ought to round out the record, and make it complete, by a declaration that it was done. The third section of the Enabling Act reads: "That in case a Constitution and State government shall be formed in compliance with the provisions of this act, the Convention form
Also tagged as: Proposed, Provisions, Cast, Convention, Votes, Adoption, Made, Third, Part, Congress, Issue, Union, Qualified, Monday, Proceedings, Duty, Thereon, Make, Submitted, Equal, People, Majority, Admitted, Subject, Preceding, Provide, Act, Constitution, County, Government, Election, States, Case, State, United, Utah, Vote
Postpone: Resolution No. 9C
Also tagged as: House
The PRESIDENT. If there is no objection, the gentleman may withdraw it for a few moments to do so. This was a decision by the Chair.
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, there is a law on the statute governing the powers and duties of the territorial librarian, and under that law, the library and he are under the control of the judges of the supreme court. That law, with the rules under it, prohibit the taking of books from the library or pamphlets, except upon an order of some justice of the court. While I apprehend that this order would not have the force of a law, still it might serve to place the librarian in an embarrassing positi
Also tagged as: Private, Rate, Nothing, Law, Court, Territory, Judges, Place, Powers, Property, Supreme, Connected, Control, Justices, Justice, Duties, Proper, Territorial
Resolution No. 9C: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Declared, Authorized, Adoption, Lake, Convention, Salt, Proposed, Second, People, Part, Following, State, Act, United, Constitution, States, Utah, Government
Call to Order 1895-03-08
Also tagged as: Convention
The Convention was called to order by President Smith.
Also tagged as: Convention
Motion to be Excused
Also tagged as: San
The PRESIDENT. The gentleman will be excused.
By the rules of the Convention, the President of the Convention becomes the Chairman of the Committee on Rules and Method of Procedures.
Also tagged as: Convention
Engrossing and enrolling clerk, Joseph A. Smith, was sworn in by the president.
List of Standing Committees [Resolution No. 11A]
Also tagged as: Convention, Secretary
Mr. GOODWIN. Mr. President, in what I am going to say I hope the President will not think for one moment that I lack appreciation of the very high honor he has conferred upon me in making me chairman of the judiciary committee, but in my little experience, I have never seen people reach places which they did not deserve and have any comfort in them; and then there is a principle of justice connected with this matter. While I earned all my legal titles honestly, it is more than twenty years sinc
Also tagged as: Years, House, Business, Make, Time, Place, People, Made, Mining, Due, Places, Connected, Judgment, Justice
Mr. ELDREDGE. Mr. President, I would be pleased as a member to vote to sustain Judge Goodwin as chairman of that committee, but inasmuch as he has expressed himself in the way that he has, I am somewhat in favor of allowing a man to enjoy his own wishes in regard to a position before he serves in that capacity.
Also tagged as: Vote, Member, Judge
Amended Motion for Mr. Goodwin to Stay as the Chairman of the Committee
Also tagged as: Judge
Point of Order: Not the Order of Business
Also tagged as: Legislative, Remain, Convention, Judge, Least, Right
The PRESIDENT. I sustain the point of order. I will say that the first named on these lists are chairmen of the committees.
Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. President, are there two reports there? The PRESIDENT. They seem to be combined.
Mr. BUTTON. Mr. President, I want to ask a question before that is put. I want to ask if that motion carries with it the hiring of Mr. Scott, the janitor of this building, to take care of the room? Mr. EVANS (Weber). As I understand it, Mr. President, it simply settles the question as to where we will hold this Convention_that is, that we will hold it in this room.
Mr. ROBERTS. Mr. President, I certainly would raise an objection to the striking out of that part of the report relating to the janitor of the county part of this building. The county court, as I understand it, has generously proffered the use of this hall, practically free of rental, and for this Convention now to push aside the county janitor, it seems to me, sirs, is a piece of ingratitude that I sincerely hope will not be resorted to by the gentlemen of this Convention. I, of course, don't k
Also tagged as: Business, Court, Place, Made, Part, Use, Convention, Free, County
Mr. EICHNOR. Mr. President, I arise for information. If we adopt that report, is that to displace our watchman and janitor that we elected the other day_that is just what I want to know? The PRESIDENT. The committee may be enabled to answer that question. Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, I should suppose that we needed the services of a watchman and doorkeeper; that I understood to be the motion under which Mr. Johnson was elected, but I found later that he was elected watchman and janitor; certain
Also tagged as: Elected, County, Place, Part, Officer, Convention
Report on Site: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Second
Mr. BUTTON. Mr. President, I am going to support the amendment of Mr. Van Horne's and the reason is if we have got any more jobs for janitors, we have got any amount of men walking the streets that want them and I do not believe in giving a man a job who has already got one. If we have a job, I want to support a man that hasn't got a job. Mr. EVANS (Weber.) I desire to support the original motion, that the report of the committee be adopted. It does seem to me that we ought to be grateful eno
Also tagged as: Made, County, Court, Officer, Convention, Support, Property, Elected, Time, House, Compensation, Paid, Amount, Part, Day, Keep, Person, Taken, First, Holding, Least, Office, Officers, Proposed, Offices
Mr. FARR. Mr. President, does this report contain the recommendation that forty new desks be made? The PRESIDENT. No, sir. Mr. FARR. Mr. President, if it does I object to spending the money. [Laughter.] Mr. RICKS. Mr. President, I want to ask a question. Does this motion contemplate this janitor employing all of his time in behalf of this Convention, or does he have charge of the rest of the building? If so, he ought to be paid proportionately.
Also tagged as: Made, Time, Paid, Convention, Money
Report on Furniture
Also tagged as: Salt, Territory, Made, Dollars, Use, Convention, Secretary, Members, Lake
Bid for Desks
Also tagged as: Following, Secretary
Mr. MORITZ. Mr. President, I would state that we have been offered thirty desks for a nominal sum, as rent, but since the gentleman who owns the desks found out that we were not in favor of renting his hall, he has refused either to rent them or sell them to us. All we can get is the territorial desks of 36 in number and to get new desks made for five dollars sufficient for our use it will cost $355. Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, in a conversation with Mr. Moritz yesterday, he assured me that fig
Also tagged as: Make, Business, Territory, Made, Subject, Number, Dollars, Use, State, Governor, Sufficient, Convention, Secretary, Territorial
Motion to Use Current Furniture
Also tagged as: Use
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, I would like to ask whether it is possible to have drawers made in the desks that we now have and whether that would be permissible or if it would be objected to by the county court? Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, the committee can confer with the county court and find out whether they object to our improving their furniture by putting drawers in. I don't believe they would. Mr. BUTTON. Mr. President, if the Convention desire, there can be made something that will set o
Also tagged as: Nothing, Court, Made, State, Keep, Secretary, Convention, County, Members, Least
Resolution on Seating Members [Resolution No. 13C]
Also tagged as: Years, First, Following, Adoption, Seat, Age, Members, Name, Member
Resolution No. 13C: Amendment
Also tagged as: Number
Resolution No. 13C: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Second, Age, Years, Counties
Resolution No. 13C: Second Amendment: Amendment
Also tagged as: Seat, Second, Lake, Salt, Members
Mr. SQUIRES. Mr. President, that will be practically the effect of the motion, as Salt Lake is pretty low down on the list. Mr. EVANS (Weber). I am not at all captious about that amendment, but my idea, I would say, in offering the resolution as it was drawn, was to thoroughly mix up the city and country members and also the Democrats and Republicans, that we might be mixed up and consult with each other and perhaps a more harmonious feeling might result from it. If we get to concentration as c
Also tagged as: Lake, Salt, Seat, Effect, City, Counties, Members
Resolution No. 13C: Third Amendment
Also tagged as: Third, Keep
Mr. GOODWIN. Mr. President, I arise for information; suppose these seats are decided upon to- day, how will any one distinguish his seat when he comes here to-morrow? There are no numbers on them. The tables are not designated. The PRESIDENT. He will have to put his mark on it, I guess. Mr. GOODWIN. There are a great many here that will never make their mark. [Laughter.]
Also tagged as: Receive, Make, Day, Second, Seat
Point of Order: The Motion Lacked a Second
The PRESIDENT. No; Mr. Coray's amendment did not receive a second.
Resolution No. 13C: Third Amendment: Amendment
Also tagged as: Third, Counties, Members
Drop: Resolution No. 13C and All Amendments
Also tagged as: Amendments, Second, Years
Mr. RICHARDS. Mr. President, I realize this is not debatable, but I would like to enter a protest if I may be permitted; I think the members of this Convention ought to be permitted to have the satisfaction of knowing that they will have a seat somewhere on the floor, and I for one would like to know where my seat is. I am not so particular about the location of it, but I should like to realize that when I come into this chamber I may find a seat unoccupied and the same seat each day. I think th
Also tagged as: Seat, Convention, Members, Day
Point of Order: Order of Business
Also tagged as: Second, Third
The PRESIDENT. It is out of order. This was a decision by the Chair.
Mr. CANNON. Mr. President, and gentlemen of the Convention, I favor the original motion for the reason that I believe as stated by the mover thereof a better feeling will prevail if the members will take their seats without regard to county or political party. I believe that it will be more satisfactory all around and for that reason I favor the original motion as put by Mr. Evans. Mr. EVANS (Weber.) Mr. President, I would like to know just what we are voting on. I am free to admit I do not ex
Also tagged as: Age, Providing, Make, Convention, Voting, Years, House, County, Counties, Members, Free
Mr. FARR. Mr. President, I voted a little while ago on the motion that all the other motions be dropped, he called the question on the motion; I supposed that was the motion. That is for every one to keep their seats that they have got now. They have got them about as they want them, and he made a motion that all others should be dropped and that was seconded, and that every one should keep their seats; that is what I voted on. Now, I would like to know what we are voting on. The PRESIDENT. You
Also tagged as: Made, Voting, Keep
Mr. ROBERTS. Mr. President, I look at these two gentlemen right in front of me and I never can vote for that kind of a proposition. Mr. IVINS. Mr. President, for information, I would wish to ask, if this motion should prevail, if it is understood that as the list of counties is called the delegates from those counties are to choose their seats, is that the idea? The PRESIDENT. That they draw by lot, is the understanding I have. Mr. IVINS. That is what I want to know, whether they draw by lot
Also tagged as: Name, Proposition, Counties, Members, Vote, County
The PRESIDENT. The matter now recurs upon the original motion of Mr. Evans. Mr. JAMES. I would like to make an inquiry, I would like to ask the gentlemen of sixty years of age in the room if they wish to change their seats from where they are now sitting. Mr. CREER. They may do as they please. Mr. JAMES. I would like to give them the privilege of remaining right where they are if they want to stay there. Mr. IVINS. Mr. President, I am opposed to this motion, for this reason, that there are d
Also tagged as: Years, Make, House, County, Washington, Seat, Number, Age, Counties, Change, Right, Representative
Motion to Refer [Resolution No. 14D] to Committee on Rules.
Also tagged as: Subject
Resolution on Sustaining Committee Appointments [Resolution No. 15E]
Also tagged as: Convention, Appoint, Made, Adoption, Special, Authority, Make, Hereby, Power
Motion to Refer [Resolution No. 15E] to Committee on Rules
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, I will state that the probabilities are that that will be the first rule under the usual precedent, that will be reported by the committee on rules and be a standing rule of the Convention. It is simply encumbering the record with unnecessary resolutions. Mr. HART. I do not object to sending it to the committee on rules, if there is any question about the propriety of adopting it, but it seems to me that it is a matter that we might as well settle and determine now as
Also tagged as: State, Convention, Time, Subject, Determine
Motion to Instruct the Committee on Printing
Also tagged as: Business, Matters, Make, Members, Convention
Mr. EICHNOR. Mr. President, what we absolutely need is the report of the committee on rules. I suppose that committee will report as soon as possible; all these matters that have been referred to at the present time will be covered, no doubt, by the rules that this Convention will adopt. Mr. HART. If there are no objections, Mr. President, I would like to have it understood that the committee on printing may have the minutes of the Convention printed without any further instructions.
Also tagged as: Convention, Time, Matters, Objections
The PRESIDENT. If there are no objections, the committee on printing will have the minutes that we have made heretofore printed.
Also tagged as: Made, Objections
Motion to Adopt.
Also tagged as: Adoption
Mr. THURMAN. Mr. President, I do not see any reason for referring this to the committee on rules. It is a matter, I think, that does not particularly belong to the committee on rules. The committee on rules are going to have enough work that will legitimately belong to them to keep them about the busiest committee of this Convention. Now, the purpose of this resolution should be patent to every member of this Convention. If the provision reported by any committee as a part of their work is drawn
Also tagged as: Convention, Constitution, Part, Member, Construed, Time, Name, Become, Keep, Courts, Provisions, Purpose, Members, Number, Consent, Make, Effect, Incorporated, State
Resolution on Printing Slips [Resolution No. 18H]
Also tagged as: Number, Authorized, Use, Sufficient, Convention, Members
Motion to Include Enabling Act and Standing Committees
Also tagged as: Members, Act
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, I would like to inquire whether we have an authenticated certified copy of the Enabling Act from the governmental department? The PRESIDENT. We have not, to my knowledge.
Resolution on Enabling Act [Resolution No. 19I]
Also tagged as: Territory, Authority, Secretary, Authorized, Act, United, Department, States, Convention, Published
Mr. MALONEY. Mr. President, yes, it has. Mr. VARIAN. But at all events, this Convention ought to have in its possession the duly authenticated authority for its convening and acting and I believe the usual course will be to procure from the interior department an authenticated copy of the act. Mr. ROBERTS. I wish to ask them over of that motion if he contemplates that if the secretary of the Territory does not have such certified copy, that the Convention is to await the reception of one from
Also tagged as: Convention, Department, Third, Authority, Made, Published, Charter, District, Office, Territory, Congress, Act, Secretary, Case
Motion to Procure a Telephone
Also tagged as: Place, Members, Use
Motion to Adjourn
Also tagged as: Time
Motion to Discharge the Committee on Sites and Furniture
Also tagged as: Nothing, House
The PRESIDENT. There is the question of fixing the time for adjournment before the house.
Also tagged as: House, Time
Mr. CHIDESTER. Mr. President, I move we adjourn. Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. President, I believe the committee on rules will be ready to report at 2 o'clock to-morrow. If so, that report can be disposed of and we will save one day. The PRESIDENT. I doubt their ability to do it. Mr. EVANS (Weber). I appreciate the fact that we cannot be here very long without exhausting the appropriation and I believe we ought to work every day in the week, Sundays excepted. As a member of that committee on rules,
Also tagged as: Day, Member, Members, Appropriation, Monday
Mr. VARIAN. If we are going to adjourn until to-morrow, I hope the motion will be to adjourn to 2 o'clock. 12 o'clock is certainly an inconvenient hour to be here and have dinner or lunch, as the case may be, but I want to suggest to the Convention that nothing will be accomplished by simply coining here, sitting down, and going away again. These committees have got to be organized and after their organization there will be some time consumed in preparing work for the Convention in committee of
Also tagged as: Monday, Convention, Right, First, Nothing, Case, Time
The PRESIDENT. The question is on the amendment to the original motion to adjourn until 2 o'clock tomorrow.
The PRESIDENT. The question recurs on the original motion that we adjourn until next Monday at 2 o'clock p. m.
Call to Order
Also tagged as: Regular, Convention
Mr. Haynes was excused on account of sickness. Mr. ROBINSON (Kane). Mr. President, I will state that I was snowed under and could not come the direct route, so that I had to go around and I traveled 428 miles to get here. The roll was then called and the following named members answered to their names: Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. President, Mr. Spencer requested me to ask an excuse for him; he could not be here today, his distance of travel was 38 miles. Mr. KIMBALL (Weber). Mr. President, I was
Also tagged as: State, Convention, Journal, Place, Following, Members, Days
Motion to Excuse Recent Absences
The PRESIDENT. My remembrance is, Mr. Kimball, that you were excused. It is so marked on the journal.
Motion to Not Record Mr. Kimball's Mileage
Motion to Present a Report of the Committee on Rules
Mr. KIMBALL (Weber.) Mr. Varian, the minutes have not been read yet. Mr. VARIAN. I beg pardon, there was no rule requiring it. The PRESIDENT. The minutes have not been read yet, gentlemen. We will have the minutes read.
Also tagged as: Pardon
Motion to Name 'Chief Clerk' the 'Secretary'
Also tagged as: Name, Secretary
The PRESIDENT. The report of the committee on rules will fix that. Mr. EVANS (Weber). The report of the committee on rules will name him that officer all the way through, but an action has been taken, as I understand it, naming him the chief clerk, and as we find, it is very unusual in other conventions, and it is an office that is unusually attached to that of speaker. Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, I second the motion.
Also tagged as: Name, Office, Second, Officer, Taken
Motion to know the 'Minute Clerk' as 'Assistant Secretary'.
Also tagged as: Second, Secretary
Mr. CHIDESTER. Mr. President, I think the law provides that it shall be chief clerk. The PRESIDENT. The Enabling Act I think provides it. Mr. KIMBALL (Weber). It makes no difference as to what he shall be called.
Motion to Read Report on Committee on Rules
Convention Considers Rules Committee's Report
Also tagged as: Convention
Motion to Read Sections
Also tagged as: Time, Passed
Motion to Read on the Next Meeting of the Convention
Also tagged as: Convention, Member, Second
Motion to Allow Stenographer
Also tagged as: Time, Make
Mr. THURMAN. Mr. President, I do not think this motion should prevail. Before the rules are printed I believe they ought to be read by sections. There may be some slight amendments proposed here and adopted by this Convention, and if that be true, they can then be printed as amended and we have not got so much to do this afternoon but what we can just as well consider these rules as anything else. Hence, I am opposed to the amendment. I am not opposed to that part which appropriates the amount
Also tagged as: Provide, Made, Judge, Proper, Member, Determine, Business, Make, House, Amount, Necessary, Secretary, Members, Convention, Proposed, Least, Time, Amendments, Part, Dollars, State, Public
Mr. KIMBALL (Weber). Mr. President, with the consent of my second I will withdraw my motion until the rules are read. The PRESIDENT. If there is no objection, the motion may be withdrawn. Did you intend to withdraw that part of the motion which referred to allowing $14.00 for the work? Mr. KIMBALL (Weber). I withdraw the whole motion until the rules are read.
Also tagged as: Part, Second, Consent
Standing Rules of the Constitutional Convention of the Territory of Utah
Also tagged as: Convention, Utah, Territory, Secretary
Standing Rules of the Constitutional Convention of the Territory of Utah: Amendment
Also tagged as: Second, Convention, First, Following, Territory, Utah
Mr. VARIAN. Mr. President, on behalf of the committee on rules, I desire to present to the Convention the reason that moved the committee to fix that hour. It was considered that if the Convention met at ten o'clock, all the members, or at least a large number of them would be present, and it would be easy to gather them all into the committee rooms. For some time, possibly a week or more, there will be little work for the Convention, as such, to perform. It is very necessary that the several co
Also tagged as: Convention, Members, Perform, Least, Several, Part, Day, Purpose, Necessary, Number, Legislature, Times, Right, Legislative, Change, Made, Holding, Case, Make, Effect, Persons, Time
Motion to Adopt For One Day
Also tagged as: Time, Second, Day
Motion to Pass Rules Seperately
Also tagged as: Passed, Pass, Judge
Motion for Automatic Adoption
Also tagged as: Adoption, Made
The PRESIDENT. There has been a request to have rule 22 read. If the gentlemen will give attention it will be read. The secretary then read rule 22.
Also tagged as: Secretary
Standing Rules of the Constitutional Convention of the Territory of Utah: Second Amendment
Also tagged as: Power, Provided, Make, Territory, Made, Utah, Convention, Second
The PRESIDENT. There is a motion before the house. The motion is out of order.
Also tagged as: House
Mr. RICHARDS. Mr. President, I am in favor of the motion made by the gentleman from Salt Lake, to adopt these rules for one day. There are several things in the rules that seem to me need a little change. If I understand them right as they were read, they are not altogether harmonious one with the other. It is impossible to offer an intelligent amendment at the present time, and if the gentleman will include in his motion the printing of the rules that we may have them before the next meeting, I
Also tagged as: Time, Make, House, Salt, Continue, Made, Amendments, Days, Several, Day, Lake, Members, Convention, Change, Member, Right
Motion to Extend
Also tagged as: Time, Days
The PRESIDENT. There was an amendment, if I recollect correctly, to Judge Goodwin's motion. Mr. GOODWIN. It wasn't seconded. The PRESIDENT. It wasn't seconded, all right. Gentlemen, you have heard the motion that the rules be adopted for two days, and that they be printed.
Also tagged as: Right, Days, Judge
Mr. JAMES. I only want to say, Mr. President, that I hope that the motion will prevail.
Mr. WELLS. Mr. President, are reports of committees in order? The PRESIDENT. Yes, if there are any committee reports, they should be sent to the table. Mr. WELLS. I have a report of the committee on official stenographer. Mr. EVANS (Weber). Mr. President, these rules are now in force; I would suggest that the chair take up the order announced by the rules. Mr. RALEIGH. Mr. President, I noticed in the rules as read a rule in relation to precluding members from speaking twice on a question unt
Also tagged as: Number, Part, State, Members, Secretary, Right, Member, Official
Presentation of Memorials to Be in Order
Report from the Committee of Printing [Resolution No. 21B]
Also tagged as: Following, Secretary
Motion to Forgo Reading Bids
Also tagged as: Necessary, Time, Houses
The PRESIDENT. Does anybody desire to hear these bids read?
Report on the Committee on Stenographer [Resolution No. 22C]
Also tagged as: Official, Secretary
Motion to Adopt
Also tagged as: Second, Adoption
Mr. HART. Mr. President, I would like to inquire of the committee if they have received any terms from any stenographers except Mr. McGurrin. It would seem to me that the charges for the gentleman for transcribing are rather high_15 cents per folio, as I remember the report to be. I think perhaps we could get this work done for five cents per folio. In fact, I am informed that we can get the minutes transcribed at that rate. Ten cents, Mr. President, is the rate fixed by law for the transcribing
Also tagged as: Convention, Make, Dollars, Made, Fifteen, Day, States, Proceedings, Utah, Part, Secretary, Official, Pay, Persons, Power, Case, Member, Territory, Judgment, Taken, Contract, Equal, Labor, State, Rate, Powers, City, Compensation, Qualified, Terms, Members, Respective, Law, Proper, Entitled, Several, Courts, Time, Proposition, Appropriation,